Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


-ism

-ism

.
[F.
-isme
, or L.
-ismus
, Gr. [GREEK].]
A suffix indicating an act, a process, the result of an act or a process, a state; also, a characteristic (as a theory, doctrine, idiom, etc.);
as, bapt
ism
, galvan
ism
, organ
ism
, hypnot
ism
, social
ism
, sensual
ism
, Anglic
ism
.

Definition 2021


-ism

-ism

See also: ism, ISM, -ism-, and ism.

English

Suffix

-ism

  1. Used to form nouns of action or process or result based on the accompanying verb in -ize.
    baptism (1300), aphorism (1528), criticism (1607), magnetism (1616)
  2. Used to form the name of a system, school of thought or theory based on the name of its subject or object or alternatively on the name of its founder ((when de-capitalized, these overlap with the generic "doctrines" sense below, e.g. Liberalism vs. liberalism):).
    Lutheranism (1560), Calvinism (1570), Protestantism (1606), Congregationalism (1716), Mohammedanism (1815),: Palamism (1949)
  3. Used to form names of a tendency of behaviour, action, state, condition or opinion belonging to a class or group of persons, or the result of a doctrine, ideology or principle or lack thereof.
    atheism (1587), ruffianism (1589), giantism (1639), fanaticism (1652), theism (1678), religionism (1706), patriotism (1716), heroism (1717), despotism (1728), old-maidism (1776), capitalism (1792), nationism (1798), romanticism (1803), conservatism (1832), sexualism (1842), vegetarianism (1848), externalism (1856), young-ladyism (1869), opportunism (1870), blackguardism (1875), jingoism (1878), feminism (1895), dwarfism (1895)
  4. Used to form nouns indicating a peculiarity or characteristic of language
    Atticism (1612), Gallicism (1656), archaism (1709), Americanism (1781), colloquialism (1834), newspaperism (1838), Shakespearianism (1886),
  5. Used to form names of ideologies expressing belief in the superiority of a certain class within the concept expressed by the root word, or a pattern of behavior or a social norm that benefits members of the group indicated by the root word. ((based on a late 20th-century narrowing of the "terms for a doctrine" sense):)
    racism (1932), sexism (1936), classism (1971), speciesism (1975), heterosexism (1979), ableism (1981)
  6. (medicine) Used to form names of conditions or syndromes
    crotalism, daturism, latrodectism, loxoscelism, cocainism, rheumatism

Derived terms

<a class='CategoryTreeLabel CategoryTreeLabelNs14 CategoryTreeLabelCategory' href='/wiki/Category:English_words_suffixed_with_-ism'>English words suffixed with -ism</a>

Related terms

Translations

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, s.v. "-ism, suffix".

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin -ismus, French -isme, ultimately from Ancient Greek -ισμός (-ismós).

Suffix

-ism n (plural -isme)

  1. -ism (indicates a belief or principle)
    creștin (Christian) + -ismcreștinism (Christianity)
    anarhie (anarchy) + -ismanarhism (anarchism)

Declension

Derived terms

<a class='CategoryTreeLabel CategoryTreeLabelNs14 CategoryTreeLabelCategory' href='/wiki/Category:Romanian_words_suffixed_with_-ism'>Romanian words suffixed with -ism</a>

Related terms