Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Prolong

Pro-long′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Prolonged
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Prolonging
.]
[F.
prolonger
, L.
prolongare
;
pro
before, forth +
longus
long. See
Long
,
Adj.
, and cf.
Prolongate
,
Purloin
. ]
1.
To extend in space or length;
as, to
prolong
a line
.
2.
To lengthen in time; to extend the duration of; to draw out; to continue;
as, to
prolong
one’s days
.
Prolong
awhile the traitor's life.
Shakespeare
The unhappy queen with talk
prolonged
the night.
Dryden.
3.
To put off to a distant time; to postpone.
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Prolong

PROLONG'

,
Verb.
T.
[L.pro and longus. See Long.]
1.
To lengthen in time; to extend the duration of. Temperate habits tend to prolong life.
2.
To lengthen; to draw out in time by delay; to continue.
Th' unhappy queen with talk prolong'd the night.
3.
To put off to a distant time.
For I myself am not so well provided
As else I would be, were the day prolong'd.
4.
To extend in space or length.

Definition 2022


prolong

prolong

English

Verb

prolong (third-person singular simple present prolongs, present participle prolonging, simple past and past participle prolonged)

  1. (transitive) To extend in space or length.
  2. (transitive) To lengthen in time; to extend the duration of; to draw out; to continue.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 5, in A Cuckoo in the Nest:
      The departure was not unduly prolonged. In the road Mr. Love and the driver favoured the company with a brief chanty running. “Got it?—No, I ain't, 'old on,—Got it? Got it?—No, 'old on sir.”
  3. (transitive) To lengthen temporally; to put off to a distant time; to postpone.
    The government shouldn't prolong deciding on this issue any further.

Translations

Derived terms

References

  • prolong in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • prolong in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913