Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Rug

Rug

,
Noun.
[Cf. Sw.
rugg
entanglend hair,
ruggig
rugged, shaggy, probably akin to E.
rough
. See
Rough
,
Adj.
]
1.
A kind of coarse, heavy frieze, formerly used for garments.
They spin the choicest
rug
in Ireland. A friend of mine . . . repaired to Paris Garden clad in one of these Waterford
rugs
. The mastiffs, . . . deeming he had been a bear, would fain have baited him.
Holinshed.
2.
A piece of thick, nappy fabric, commonly made of wool, – used for various purposes, as for covering and ornamenting part of a bare floor, for hanging in a doorway as a potière, for protecting a portion of carpet, for a wrap to protect the legs from cold, etc.
3.
A rough, woolly, or shaggy dog.
Rug gown
,
a gown made of rug, of or coarse, shaggy cloth.
B. Johnson.

Rug

,
Verb.
T.
To pull roughly or hastily; to plunder; to spoil; to tear.
[Scot.]
Sir W. Scott.

Webster 1828 Edition


Rug

RUG

,
Noun.
[This belongs to the great family of rough, L. ruga, raucus.]
1.
A coarse nappy woolen cloth used for a bed cover, and in modern times particularly, for covering the carpet before a fire-place. This name was formerly given to a coarse kind of frieze used for winter garments, and it may be that the poor in some countries still wear it. But in America, I believe the name is applied only to a bed cover for ordinary beds, and to a covering before a fire-place.
2.
A rough, woolly or shaggy dog.

Definition 2022


rug

rug

See also: rúg and rüg

English

Noun

rug (plural rugs)

  1. A partial covering for a floor. [1624]
  2. (Britain, Australia) A (usually thick) piece of fabric used for warmth (especially on a bed); a blanket. [1591]
    • 1855, William Howitt, A Boy′s Adventures in the Wilds of Australia: or, Herbert′s Note-Book, page 254,
      They then cut down a quantity of gum-tree leaves for a bed, and threw their rugs upon them ready for bed-time.
    • 1906 July 27, Government Gazette of Western Australia, page 2297,
      Furnish every sleeping apartment with a sufficient number of toilet utensils and bedsteads, and sufficient bedding so that each bed shall be provided with a mattress, two sheets, a rug, and, in winter time, not less than one additional rug.
    • 1950 April, Dental Journal of Australia, Volume 22, page 181,
      My own son had a bunny rug of which he was very fond and on being put to bed he would always demand his “bunny rug to suck his finger with.″
    • 1958, Arthur Hailey, John Castle. Runway Zero-Eight. Bantham Books
      She tucked in a rug round the woman. “How’s that?” The woman nodded gratefully.
    • 1997, Alan Sharpe, Vivien Encel, Murder!: 25 True Australian Crimes, page 22,
      He brought with him a rug and a sheet, and lay down by the fire.
  3. (historical, now rare) A kind of coarse, heavy frieze, formerly used for clothing. [1547]
    • Holinshed
      They spin the choicest rug in Ireland. A friend of mine [] repaired to Paris Garden clad in one of these Waterford rugs.
  4. (historical, now rare) A cloak or mantle made of such a frieze. [1577]
  5. (obsolete, rare) A person wearing a rug. [1627]
  6. A cloth covering for a horse. [1790]
  7. (obsolete, rare) A dense layer of natural vegetation that precludes the growth of crops. [1792]
  8. (slang) The female pubic hair. [1893]
  9. A rough, woolly, or shaggy dog.
  10. (slang) A wig; a hairpiece. [1940]
  11. (colloquial) A dense growth of chest hair. [1954]

Usage notes

  • (partial floor covering): The terms rug and carpet are not precise synonyms: a rug covers part of the floor; a carpet covers most or a large area of the floor; a fitted carpet runs wall-to-wall.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

rug (third-person singular simple present rugs, present participle rugging, simple past and past participle rugged)

  1. (Scotland) To pull roughly or hastily; to plunder; to spoil; to tear.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Derived terms

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch rug.

Noun

rug (plural rûe or rûens, diminutive ruggie)

  1. (plural chiefly rûe) back (rear of the body)
  2. (plural chiefly rûens) hill; ridge

Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish rugh, from Old Norse rugr, from Proto-Germanic *rugiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wrugʰyo-. Compare Norwegian rug, Swedish råg, Icelandic rúgur, Dutch rogge, Low German Rogg, German Roggen, English rye.

Noun

rug c (singular definite rugen, not used in plural form)

  1. rye (Secale cereale)

Verb

rug

  1. imperative of ruge

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʏx
  • IPA(key): /rʏx/

Etymology

From Old Dutch *ruggi, from Proto-Germanic *hrugjaz. More at ridge.

Noun

rug m (plural ruggen, diminutive ruggetje n or rugje n)

  1. (anatomy) back
  2. (geology) ridge

Derived terms


Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish ·ruc, prototonic form of ro·ucc, perfect tense of beirid.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɾˠʊɡ]

Verb

rug

  1. past analytic of beir

Manx

Verb

rug (verbal noun ruggal, past participle ruggit)

  1. to bear (give birth to)

Synonyms


Norwegian Bokmål

rug

Etymology

From Old Norse rugr, from Proto-Germanic *rugiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wrugʰyo-. Compare Danish rug, Swedish råg, Icelandic rúgur, Dutch rogge, German Roggen, English rye.

Noun

rug m (definite singular rugen)

  1. rye (the grass Secale cereale or its grains as food)

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse rugr, from Proto-Germanic *rugiz, from Proto-Indo-European *wrugʰyo-. Compare Danish rug, Swedish råg, Icelandic rúgur, Dutch rogge, German Roggen, English rye.

Noun

rug m (definite singular rugen)

  1. rye (as above)

References


Romanian

Etymology 1

From Latin rogus.

Noun

rug n (plural ruguri)

  1. pyre
Declension

Etymology 2

From Latin rubus (bramble, briar).

Noun

rug m (plural rugi)

  1. bramble
Declension

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ᵲuɡ̊]

Verb

rug

  1. past tense of beir