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Webster 1828 Edition


Did

DID

, pret of do, contracted from doed. I did, thou didst, he did; we did, you or ye did, they did.
Have ye not read what David did when he was hungry? Matthew 12.
The proper signification is, made, executed, performed; but it is used also to express the state of health.
And Mordecai walked every day before the court of the womens house, to know how Esther did. Esther 2.
Did is used as the sign of the past tense of verbs, particularly in interrogative and negative sentences; as, did he command you to go? He did not command me. It is also used to express emphasis; as, I did love him beyond measure.

Definition 2022


Did

Did

See also: did and DID

Scottish Gaelic

Proper noun

Did

  1. Sun (Sunday)

did

did

See also: Did and DID

Translingual

Alternative forms

  • (roman numeral): DID, CMXCIX, cmxcix

Number

did

  1. (informal) A Roman numeral representing nine hundred and ninety-nine (999).

See also


English

Verb

did

  1. simple past tense of do
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vi:
      she with liquors strong his eyes did steepe, / That nothing should him hastily awake [...].
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.v:
      The wearie Traueiler, wandring that way, / Therein did often quench his thristy heat, / And then by it his wearie limbes display, / Whiles creeping slomber made him to forget / His former paine [...].
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.v:
      He made him stoup perforce vnto his knee, / And do vnwilling worship to the Saint, / That on his shield depainted he did see [...].

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: should · can · made · #83: did · such · great · must

Anagrams


Molise Croatian

Etymology

From Serbo-Croatian did.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dîd/

Noun

did m

  1. grandfather

Declension

References

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale).

Novial

Etymology

From English.

Verb

did

  1. (auxiliary) added to the front of a verb, it causes that verb to be in the past tense

Usage notes

  • An equivalent effect can be obtained by adding the ending -d to the verb.

Old Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *dīyos (day) (compare Old Irish día), from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws, *dyew-.

Noun

did m

  1. day

Descendants


Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dîd/

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dědъ.

Noun

dȉd m

  1. (Ikavian) grandfather

Declension