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Webster 1913 Edition


Gale

Gale

(gāl)
,
Noun.
[Prob. of Scand. origin; cf. Dan.
gal
furious, Icel.
galinn
, cf. Icel.
gala
to sing, AS.
galan
to sing, Icel.
galdr
song, witchcraft, AS.
galdor
charm, sorcery, E. nightin
gale
; also, Icel.
gjōla
gust of wind,
gola
breeze. Cf.
Yell
.]
1.
A strong current of air; a wind between a stiff breeze and a hurricane. The most violent gales are called
tempests
.
Gales have a velocity of from about eighteen (“moderate”) to about eighty (“very heavy”) miles an our.
Sir. W. S. Harris.
2.
A moderate current of air; a breeze.
A little
gale
will soon disperse that cloud.
Shakespeare
And winds of gentlest
gale
Arabian odors fanned
From their soft wings.
Milton.
3.
A state of excitement, passion, or hilarity.
The ladies, laughing heartily, were fast getting into what, in New England, is sometimes called a
gale
.
Brooke (Eastford).
Topgallant gale
(Naut.)
,
one in which a ship may carry her topgallant sails.

Gale

,
Verb.
I.
(Naut.)
To sale, or sail fast.

Gale

,
Noun.
[OE.
gal
. See
Gale
wind.]
A song or story.
[Obs.]
Toone.

Gale

,
Verb.
I.
[AS.
galan
. See 1st
Gale
.]
To sing.
[Obs.]
“Can he cry and gale.”
Court of Love.

Gale

,
Noun.
[AS.
gagel
, akin to D.
gagel
.]
(Bot.)
A plant of the genus
Myrica
, growing in wet places, and strongly resembling the bayberry. The sweet gale (
Myrica Gale
) is found both in Europe and in America.

Gale

,
Noun.
[Cf.
Gabel
.]
The payment of a rent or annuity.
[Eng.]
Mozley & W.
Gale day
,
the day on which rent or interest is due.

Webster 1828 Edition


Gale

GALE

,
Noun.
A current of air; a strong wind. The sense of this word is very indefinite. The poets use it in the sense of a moderate breeze of current of air, as a gentle gale. A stronger wind is called a fresh gale.
In the language of seamen, the word gale,unaccompanied by an epithet, signifies a vehement wind, a storm or tempest. They say, the ship carried away her top-mast in a gale, or gale of wind; the ship rode out the gale. But the word is often qualified, as a hard or strong gale, a violent gale. A current of wind somewhat less violent is denominated a stiff gale. A less vehement wind is called a fresh gale, which is a wind not too strong for a ship to carry single reefed top-sails, when close hauled. When the wind is not so violent but that a ship will carry her top-sails a-trip or full spread, it is called a loom-gale.

GALE

,
Verb.
I.
In seamen's language, to sail, or sail fast.

Definition 2022


Gale

Gale

See also: gale, galé, and galè

English

Proper noun

Gale

  1. A surname.

gale

gale

See also: Gale, galé, and galè

English

Verb

gale (third-person singular simple present gales, present participle galing, simple past galed or gole, past participle galed or galen)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To sing; charm; enchant.
    • Court of Love
      Can he cry and gale.
  2. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To cry; groan; croak.
  3. (intransitive, of a person, now chiefly dialectal) To talk.
  4. (intransitive, of a bird, Scotland) To call.
  5. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To sing; utter with musical modulations.

Etymology 2

From Middle English gale (a wind, breeze), probably of North Germanic origin, related to Icelandic gola (a breeze), Danish gal (furious, mad),[1] both from Old Norse gala (to sing).

Noun

gale (plural gales)

  1. (meteorology) A very strong wind, more than a breeze, less than a storm; number 7 through 9 winds on the 12-step Beaufort scale.
  2. An outburst, especially of laughter.
    a gale of laughter
  3. (archaic) A light breeze.
    • Shakespeare
      A little gale will soon disperse that cloud.
    • Milton
      And winds of gentlest gale Arabian odours fanned / From their soft wings.
  4. (obsolete) A song or story.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Toone to this entry?)
Coordinate terms
Translations

See also

Verb

gale (third-person singular simple present gales, present participle galing, simple past and past participle galed)

  1. (nautical) To sail, or sail fast.

Etymology 3

Middle English gail, from Old English gagel

Noun

gale

  1. A shrub, also sweet gale or bog myrtle (Myrica gale) growing on moors and fens.
Translations

Etymology 4

Middle English gavel (rent", "tribute), from Old English gafol

Noun

gale

  1. (archaic) A periodic payment, such as is made of a rent or annuity.
    Gale day - the day on which rent or interest is due.
References
  1. Etymology of gale

Anagrams


Basque

Noun

gale

  1. eagerness

French

Etymology

Variant of galle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡal/

Noun

gale f (plural gales)

  1. scabies; mange

Anagrams


Italian

Noun

gale f

  1. plural of gala

Anagrams


Norwegian

Etymology

From Old Norse gala

Verb

gale

  1. to make a sound characteristic of a rooster; to crow
Conjugation

Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

gale

  1. definite singular of gal
  2. plural form of gal

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

Adjective

gale

  1. neuter singular of galen