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Webster 1913 Edition


Absence

Ab′sence

,
Noun.
[F., fr. L.
absentia
. See
Absent
.]
1.
A state of being absent or withdrawn from a place or from companionship; – opposed to
presence
.
Not as in my presence only, but now much more in my
absence
.
Phil. ii. 12.
2.
Want; destitution; withdrawal.
“In the absence of conventional law.”
Kent.
3.
Inattention to things present; abstraction (of mind);
as,
absence
of mind
.
“Reflecting on the little absences and distractions of mankind.”
Addison.
To conquer that abstraction which is called
absence
.
Landor.

Webster 1828 Edition


Absence

AB'SENCE

,
Noun.
[L. absens, from absum, abesse, to be away; ab and sum.]
1.
A state of being at a distance in place, or not in company. It is used to denote any distance indefinitely, either in the same town, or country, or in a foreign country; and primarily supposes a prior presence. 'Speak well of one in his absence.'
2.
Want; destitution; implying no previous presence. 'In the absence of conventional law.'
3.
In law, non-appearance; a not being in court to answer.
4.
Heedlessness; inattention to things present. Absence of mind is the attention of the mind to a subject which does not occupy the rest of the company, and which draws the mind from things or objects which are present, to others distant or foreign.

Definition 2022


absence

absence

English

Alternative forms

Noun

absence (usually uncountable, plural absences)

  1. A state of being away or withdrawn from a place or from companionship; the period of being away. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
    Absence makes the heart grow fonder.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Phillipians 2:12
      Not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence.
  2. Failure to be present where one is expected, wanted, or needed; nonattendance; deficiency. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
  3. Lack; deficiency; nonexistence. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.][1]
    He had an absence of enthusiasm.
    • (Can we date this quote?) - Kent
      In the absence of conventional law.
  4. Inattention to things present; abstraction (of mind). [First attested in the early 18th century.][1]
    absence of mind
  5. (medicine) Temporary loss or disruption of consciousness, with sudden onset and recovery, and common in epilepsy. [First attested in the mid 20th century.][1]
  6. (fencing) Lack of contact between blades.

Derived terms

Related terms

Antonyms

Translations

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Brown, Lesley, editor (1933) The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7, published 2003, page 8

Czech

Etymology

From French absence, from Latin absentia, from absēns (absent), present active participle of absum (I am away or absent), from ab (of, by, from) + sum (I am)

Noun

absence f

  1. absence

Declension


Danish

Etymology

From French absence.

Noun

absence c (singular definite absencen, plural indefinite absencer)

  1. (medicine) petit mal

Inflection

Synonyms

References


French

Etymology

From Latin absentia, from absēns (absent), present active participle of absum (I am away or absent), from ab (of, by, from) + sum (I am).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ap.sɑ̃s/

Noun

absence f (plural absences)

  1. absence (state of being absent or withdrawn)

Middle English

Etymology

From Old French absent, from Latin absentia, from absēns (absent), present active participle of absum (I am away or absent), from ab (of, by, from) + sum (I am).

Noun

absence (plural absences)

  1. absent

Related terms

References

  • Stratmann, Francis Henry; Henry Bradley (First published 1891) A Dictionary of Middle English, London: Oxford University Press, published 1954, page 3