Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Bubo

Bu′bo

(bū′bō̍)
,
Noun.
;
pl.
Buboes
(-bō̍z)
.
[LL.
bubo
the groin, a swelling in the groin, Gr.
βουβών
.]
(Med.)
An inflammation, with enlargement, of a lymphatic gland, esp. in the groin, as in syphilis.

Webster 1828 Edition


Bubo

BU'BO

,
Noun.
[L. bubo, a swelling.] A tumor or abscess with inflammation, which rises in certain glandular parts of the body, as in the groin, or armpit.

Definition 2021


Bubo

Bubo

See also: bubo, bubó, and boo-boo

Translingual

Proper noun

Bubo m

  1. A taxonomic genus within the family Strigidae horned owls, eagle owls and fish owls.

Hypernyms

Hyponyms

References

  • Gill, F. and Wright, M. (2006) Birds of the World: Recommended English Names, Princeton University Press, ISBN 978-0691128276

bubo

bubo

See also: Bubo, bubó, and boo-boo

English

Buboes on the leg of a patient with bubonic plague.

Noun

bubo (plural buboes)

  1. (pathology) An inflamed swelling of a lymph node, especially in the armpit or the groin, due to an infection such as bubonic plague, gonorrhea, tuberculosis or syphilis.
    • 1661, Johann Jacob Wecker, Eighteen books of the secrets of art and nature: being the summe and substance of naturall philisophy ..., page 42:
      If a Bubo or Carbuncle appear, set on Leeches not far from it, if it be in an ignoble part; ...

Derived terms

Translations


Esperanto

Etymology

From German Bube (boy, knave).

Noun

bubo (accusative singular bubon, plural buboj, accusative plural bubojn)

  1. wicked boy
  2. (card games) jack

See also

Playing cards in Esperanto · ludkartoj (layout · text)
aso duo trio kvaro kvino seso sepo
oko naŭo deko fanto, bubo damo reĝo ĵokero

Ido

Etymology

Borrowing from German Bube.

Noun

bubo (plural bubi)

  1. urchin, waif, street Arab, kid (living on street), gamin

Derived terms

  • bubacho (rascal, rogue)

Latin

būbō (horned owl)

Etymology 1

From Proto-Indo-European *b(e)u (owl), see also Ancient Greek βύας (búas), Bulgarian буч (buč), Old Armenian բուէճ (buēč), and North Persian بوم (bum). The Indo-European root is onomatopoeic and was borrowed into Semitic languages such as Arabic بُوم (būm) and Classical Syriac ܒܐܘܐ (baʾwāʾ) and Caucasian languages such as Old Georgian ბუვი (buvi), Chechen бухӏа (buha), and Aghul бу́гьу.[1]

Alternative forms

  • *būfo (Vulgar Latin)

Pronunciation

Noun

būbō m (genitive būbōnis); third declension

  1. an owl, especially the Eurasian eagle owl, Bubo bubo.
Usage notes

Nearly always masculine, but used once as a feminine noun by Virgil in Aeneis IV:462:

hinc exaudiri voces et verba vocantis
visa viri, nox cum terras obscura teneret,
solaque culminibus ferali carmine bubo
saepe queri et longas in fletum ducere voces;
Inflection

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative būbō būbōnēs
genitive būbōnis būbōnum
dative būbōnī būbōnibus
accusative būbōnem būbōnēs
ablative būbōne būbōnibus
vocative būbō būbōnēs
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Romanian: buhă
  • Spanish: búho
  • Translingual: Bubo

References

  1. Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, Mallory, Adams

Etymology 2

Medieval Latin; from Ancient Greek βουβών (boubṓn, groin, swelling).

Pronunciation

Noun

būbō m (genitive būbōnis); third declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) Alternative form of būbōnēs

Etymology 3

From būtiō (bittern)

Pronunciation

Verb

bubō (present infinitive bubere); third conjugation, no perfect or supine forms

  1. I cry like a bittern.

References