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Webster 1913 Edition


Canal

Ca-nal′

,
Noun.
[F.
canal
, from L.
canalis
canal, channel; prob. from a root signifying “to cut”; cf. D.
kanaal
, fr. the French. Cf.
Channel
,
Kennel
gutter.]
1.
An artificial channel filled with water and designed for navigation, or for irrigating land, etc.
2.
(Anat.)
A tube or duct;
as, the alimentary
canal
; the semicircular
canals
of the ear
.
Canal boat
,
a boat for use on a canal; esp. one of peculiar shape, carrying freight, and drawn by horses walking on the towpath beside the canal.
Canal lock
.
See
Lock
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Canal

CANAL

, n.
1.
A passage for water; a water course; properly, a long trench or excavation in the earth for conducting water, and confining it to narrow limits; but the term may be applied to other water courses. It is chiefly applied to artificial cuts or passages for water, used for transportation; whereas channel is applicable to a natural water course.
The canal from the Hudson to Lake Erie is one of the noblest works of art.
2.
In anatomy, a duct or passage in the body of an animal, through which any of the juices flow, or other substances pass; as the neck of the bladder, and the alimentary canal.
3.
A surgical instrument; a splint.

Definition 2022


canal

canal

See also: canàl

English

A canal.

Noun

canal (plural canals)

  1. An artificial waterway or artificially improved river used for travel, shipping, or irrigation.
  2. (anatomy) A tubular channel within the body.
  3. (astronomy) One of the faint, hazy markings resembling straight lines on early telescopic images of the surface of Mars.

Related terms

Translations

Verb

canal (third-person singular simple present canals, present participle canaling or canalling, simple past and past participle canaled or canalled)

  1. To dig an artificial waterway in or to (a place), especially for drainage
    • 1968, Louisiana State University, Proceedings, page 165:
      In the mangrove-type salt marsh, the entire marsh must be canaled or impounded.
  2. To travel along a canal by boat
    • 1905, William Yoast Morgan, A Journey of a Jayhawker, page 211:
      Near Rotterdam we canalled by Delfthaven.

Asturian

Noun

canal m (plural canales)

  1. canal (artificial waterway)

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin canālis (channel; canal).

Noun

canal m (plural canals)

  1. canal; channel (artificial passage for water)

French

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin canālis. Doublet of chenal.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ka.nal/

Noun

canal m (plural canaux)

  1. canal
  2. channel (broadcasting: specific radio frequency or band of frequencies)

Related terms

See also

Anagrams


Norman

Etymology

From Old French canal, from Latin canālis (channel; canal).

Noun

canal m (plural canaux)

  1. (Jersey) canal

Portuguese

canal

Etymology

From Old Portuguese canal, from Latin canālis (canal), from canna (reed, cane), from Ancient Greek κάννα (kánna, reed), from Akkadian 𒄀 (qanû, reed), from Sumerian 𒄀𒈾 (gi.na).

Pronunciation

Noun

canal m (plural canais)

  1. ditch
  2. canal (artificial waterway)
  3. (radio) channel (broadcasting: specific radio frequency or band of frequencies)
  4. (television) television channel

Synonyms

Derived terms

  • (canal): canal-do-Panamá

Romanian

Etymology

From French canal, from Latin canālis.

Noun

canal n (plural canale)

  1. (plural canaluri) canal
  2. channel

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin canālis (channel; canal).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -al

Noun

canal m (plural canales)

  1. canal (waterway)
  2. channel (of television)
  3. (communication) channel
  4. (chemistry) channel
  5. cleavage

Derived terms


Venetian

Noun

canal m (plural canałi)

  1. canal
  2. channel (all senses)