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Webster 1913 Edition


Embark

Em-bark′

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Embarked
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Embarking
.]
[F.
embarquer
; pref.
em-
(L.
in
) +
barque
bark: cf. Sp.
embarcar
, It.
imbarcare
. See
Bark
. a vessel.]
1.
To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard.
2.
To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, money, etc.) in any affair;
as, he
embarked
his fortune in trade
.
It was the reputation of the sect upon which St. Paul
embarked
his salvation.
South.

Em-bark′

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To go on board a vessel or a boat for a voyage;
as, the troops
embarked
for Lisbon
.
2.
To engage in any affair.
Slow to
embark
in such an undertaking.
Macaulay.

Webster 1828 Edition


Embark

EMB`ARK

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To put or cause to enter on board a ship or other vessel or boat. The general embarked his troops and their baggage.
2.
To engage a person in any affair. This projector embarked his friends in the design or expedition.

EMB`ARK

,
Verb.
I.
To go on board of a ship, boat or vessel; as, the troops embarked for Lisbon.
1.
To engage in any business; to undertake in; to take a share in. The young man embarked rashly in speculation, and was ruined.

Definition 2022


embark

embark

English

Verb

embark (third-person singular simple present embarks, present participle embarking, simple past and past participle embarked)

  1. To get on a boat or ship or (outside the USA) an aeroplane.
    All passengers please embark now.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, chapter I”, in Gossamer (Project Gutenberg; EBook #24394), London: Methuen & Co., published 8 January 2013 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 558189256:
      It is never possible to settle down to the ordinary routine of life at sea until the **** begins to revolve. There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy.
  2. To start, begin.
    Phil embarked on his journey yesterday.
  3. (transitive) To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard.
  4. (transitive) To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, money, etc.) in any affair.
    He embarked his fortune in trade.
    • Robert South (1634–1716)
      It was the reputation of the sect upon which St. Paul embarked his salvation.

Antonyms

Derived terms

Translations