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Webster 1913 Edition


Gold

Gold

(gōld)
,
Noun.
[AS.
gold
; akin to D.
goud
, OS. & G.
gold
, Icel.
gull
, Sw. & Dan.
guld
, Goth.
gulþ
, Russ. & OSlav.
zlato
; prob. akin to E.
yellow
. √49, 234. See
Yellow
, and cf.
Gild
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
(Chem.)
A metallic element of atomic number 79, constituting the most precious metal used as a common commercial medium of exchange. It has a characteristic yellow color, is one of the heaviest substances known (specific gravity 19.32), is soft, and very malleable and ductile. It is quite unalterable by heat (melting point 1064.4° C), moisture, and most corrosive agents, and therefore well suited for its use in coin and jewelry. Symbol Au (
Aurum
). Atomic weight 196.97.
☞ Native gold contains usually eight to ten per cent of silver, but often much more. As the amount of silver increases, the color becomes whiter and the specific gravity lower. Gold is very widely disseminated, as in the sands of many rivers, but in very small quantity. It usually occurs in quartz veins (gold quartz), in slate and metamorphic rocks, or in sand and alluvial soil, resulting from the disintegration of such rocks. It also occurs associated with other metallic substances, as in auriferous pyrites, and is combined with tellurium in the minerals
petzite
,
calaverite
,
sylvanite
, etc. Pure gold is too soft for ordinary use, and is hardened by alloying with silver and copper, the latter giving a characteristic reddish tinge. [See
Carat
.] Gold also finds use in gold foil, in the pigment
purple of Cassius
, and in the chloride, which is used as a toning agent in photography.
2.
Money; riches; wealth.
For me, the
gold
of France did not seduce.
Shakespeare
3.
A yellow color, like that of the metal;
as, a flower tipped with
gold
.
4.
Figuratively, something precious or pure;
as, hearts of
gold
.
Shak.
Age of gold
.
See
Golden age
, under
Golden
.
Dutch gold
,
Fool’s gold
,
Gold dust
,
etc. See under
Dutch
,
Dust
, etc.
Gold amalgam
,
a mineral, found in Columbia and California, composed of gold and mercury.
Gold beater
,
one whose occupation is to beat gold into gold leaf.
Gold beater's skin
,
the prepared outside membrane of the large intestine of the ox, used for separating the leaves of metal during the process of gold-beating.
Gold beetle
(Zool.)
,
any small gold-colored beetle of the family
Chrysomelidæ
; – called also
golden beetle
.
Gold blocking
,
printing with gold leaf, as upon a book cover, by means of an engraved block.
Knight.
Gold cloth
.
See
Cloth of gold
, under
Cloth
.
Gold Coast
,
a part of the coast of Guinea, in West Africa.
Gold cradle
.
(Mining)
See
Cradle
,
Noun.
, 7.
Gold diggings
,
the places, or region, where gold is found by digging in sand and gravel from which it is separated by washing.
Gold end
,
a fragment of broken gold or jewelry.
Gold-end man
.
(a)
A buyer of old gold or jewelry.
(b)
A goldsmith's apprentice.
(c)
An itinerant jeweler.
“I know him not: he looks like a gold-end man.”
B. Jonson.
Gold fever
,
a popular mania for gold hunting.
Gold field
,
a region in which are deposits of gold.
Gold finder
.
(a)
One who finds gold.
(b)
One who empties privies.
[Obs. & Low]
Swift.
Gold flower
,
a composite plant with dry and persistent yellow radiating involucral scales, the
Helichrysum Stœchas
of Southern Europe. There are many South African species of the same genus.
Gold foil
,
thin sheets of gold, as used by dentists and others. See
Gold leaf
.
Gold knobs
or
Gold knoppes
(Bot.)
,
buttercups.
Gold lace
,
a kind of lace, made of gold thread.
Gold latten
,
a thin plate of gold or gilded metal.
Gold leaf
,
gold beaten into a film of extreme thinness, and used for gilding, etc. It is much thinner than gold foil.
Gold lode
(Mining)
,
a gold vein.
Gold mine
,
a place where gold is obtained by mining operations, as distinguished from diggings, where it is extracted by washing. Cf.
Gold diggings
(above).
Gold nugget
,
a lump of gold as found in gold mining or digging; – called also a
pepito
.
Gold paint
.
See
Gold shell
.
Gold pheasant
, or
Golden pheasant
.
(Zool.)
See under
Pheasant
.
Gold plate
,
a general name for vessels, dishes, cups, spoons, etc., made of gold.
Gold of pleasure
.
[Name perhaps translated from Sp.
oro-de-alegria
.]
(Bot.)
A plant of the genus
Camelina
, bearing yellow flowers.
C. sativa
is sometimes cultivated for the oil of its seeds.
Gold shell
.
(a)
A composition of powdered gold or gold leaf, ground up with gum water and spread on shells, for artists' use; – called also
gold paint
.
(b)
(Zool.)
A bivalve shell (
Anomia glabra
) of the Atlantic coast; – called also
jingle shell
and
silver shell
. See
Anomia
.
Gold size
,
a composition used in applying gold leaf.
Gold solder
,
a kind of solder, often containing twelve parts of gold, two of silver, and four of copper.
Gold stick
,
the colonel of a regiment of English lifeguards, who attends his sovereign on state occasions; – so called from the gilt rod presented to him by the sovereign when he receives his commission as colonel of the regiment.
[Eng.]
Gold thread
.
(a)
A thread formed by twisting flatted gold over a thread of silk, with a wheel and iron bobbins; spun gold.
Ure.
(b)
(Bot.)
A small evergreen plant (
Coptis trifolia
), so called from its fibrous yellow roots. It is common in marshy places in the United States.
Gold tissue
,
a tissue fabric interwoven with gold thread.
Gold tooling
,
the fixing of gold leaf by a hot tool upon book covers, or the ornamental impression so made.
Gold washings
,
places where gold found in gravel is separated from lighter material by washing.
Gold worm
,
a glowworm.
[Obs.]
Jeweler's gold
,
an alloy containing three parts of gold to one of copper.
Mosaic gold
.
See under
Mosaic
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Gold

GOLD

,
Noun.
1.
A precious metal of a bright yellow color, and the most ductile and malleable of all the metals. It is the heaviest metal except platina; and being a very dense, fixed substance, and not liable to be injured by air, it is well fitted to be used as coin, or a representative of commodities in commerce. Its ductility and malleability render it the most suitable metal for gilding. It is often found native in solid masses, as in Hungary and Peru; though generally in combination with silver, copper or iron.
2.
Money.
For me, the gold of France did not seduce--
3.
Something pleasing or valuable; as a heart of gold.
4.
A bright yellow color; as a flower edged with gold.
5.
Riches; wealth.
Gold of pleasure, a plant of the genus Myagrum.

GOLD

,
Adj.
Made of gold; consisting of gold; as a gold chain.

Definition 2022


Gold

Gold

See also: gold and gòld

English

Proper noun

Gold

  1. A surname.

German

Etymology

From Old High German gold, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą.

Pronunciation

Noun

Gold n (genitive Goldes or Golds, no plural)

  1. gold (chemical element, Au)

Declension

Derived terms

Coordinate terms

See also


German Low German

Chemical element
Au Previous: Platin (Pt)
Next: Quecksülver (Hg)

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Middle Low German gôlt, from Old Saxon gōld, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą. More at gold.

Noun

Gold n (no plural)

  1. gold (chemical element, Au)
  2. gold (color)
  3. (heraldry) or

Derived terms

See also

  • cheemsch Element
  • Eddelmetall

References

  • Der neue SASS: Plattdeutsches Wörterbuch, Plattdeutsch - Hochdeutsch, Hochdeutsch - Plattdeutsch. Plattdeutsche Rechtschreibung, sixth revised edition (2011, ISBN 978-3-529-03000-0, Wachholtz Verlag, Neumünster)

Luxembourgish

Chemical element
Au Previous: Platin (Pt)
Next: Quecksëlwer (Hg)

Etymology

From Old High German gold, from Proto-Germanic *gulþą. Cognate with German Gold, English gold, Dutch goud, Icelandic gull.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡolt/

Noun

Gold n (uncountable)

  1. gold

Derived terms

gold

gold

See also: gòld and Gold

English

Chemical element
Au Previous: platinum (Pt)
Next: mercury (Hg)
A gold nugget.

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

Noun

gold (countable and uncountable, plural golds)

  1. (uncountable) A heavy yellow elemental metal of great value, with atomic number 79 and symbol Au.
  2. (countable) A coin made of this material, or supposedly so.
  3. (countable) A bright yellow colour, resembling the metal gold.
    gold colour:    
  4. (countable) The bullseye of an archery target.
  5. (countable) A gold medal.
    France has won three golds and five silvers.
  6. (figuratively) Anything or anyone considered to be very valuable.
    • 2010, Paul Hendy, Who Killed Simon Peters?
      Now obviously this meant that I went over my allotted time, but the theatre management didn't mind because I was giving them comedy gold and that's what gets bums on seats.
    • 2012, Victor Pemberton, Leo's Girl
      Marge Quincey didn't deserve a husband like his dad. He was pure gold, and she wasn't worth a light beside him.
  7. (fantasy role-playing games, fantasy board games) Miscellaneous unit of currency in fantasy genre.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Related terms
See also
Translations

Adjective

gold (not generally comparable, comparative golder, superlative goldest)

  1. Made of gold.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. [] A silver snaffle on a heavy leather watch guard which connected the pockets of his corduroy waistcoat, together with a huge gold stirrup in his Ascot tie, sufficiently proclaimed his tastes.
  2. Having the colour of gold.
    • 1927, F. E. Penny, chapter 4, in Pulling the Strings:
      Soon after the arrival of Mrs. Campbell, dinner was announced by Abboye. He came into the drawing room resplendent in his gold-and-white turban. […] His cummerbund matched the turban in gold lines.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess:
      Here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the pictures, mostly of the English school, were mellow and gentle in the afternoon light.
  3. (of commercial services) Premium, superior.
Translations
Synonyms
  • (made of gold, having the colour of gold): golden

Verb

gold (third-person singular simple present golds, present participle golding, simple past and past participle golded)

  1. To pyrolyze or burn food until the color begins to change to a light brown, but not as dark as browning

See also

Etymology 2

From gold master, a copy of the code certified as being ready for release.

Adjective

gold (not comparable)

  1. (programming, of software) In a finished state, ready for manufacturing.
    • 2004 November, “Half-Life 2 goes gold”, in HWM, page 10:
      The Company confirmed that Half-Life 2, developed by Valve Software, has gone gold with a planned retail street date of November 16, 2004.
    • 2011, Jordan Gray, Unearthed, page 6:
      He felt bone-tired and twitchy, the way he did in the final stages of putting a video-game project together, almost ready to go gold and turn a new game loose on the public.
    • 2011, Jessica Mulligan and Bridgette Patrovsky, quoting Damion Schubert, Developing Online Games: An Insider's Guide, page 221:
      I had coded guilds into M59 over the weekend, shortly before we were supposed to go gold.

Adverb

gold (not comparable)

  1. of or referring to a gold version of something

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: service · various · u · #586: gold · letters · history · master

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔl/, [ɡ̊ʌlˀ]

Adjective

gold

  1. barren, desolate
  2. sterile (unable to reproduce)
  3. dry, (of a cow) not producing milk
    En gold ko.
    A dry cow.

Inflection

Inflection of gold
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular gold goldere goldest2
Neuter singular goldt goldere goldest2
Plural golde goldere goldest2
Definite attributive1 golde goldere goldeste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Derived terms


Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

gold

  1. singular past indicative of gelden

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English gold (gold), from Proto-Germanic *gulþą (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰl̥tóm (gold), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰelh₃- (yellow; gleam; to shine).

Noun

gold (plural golds)

  1. gold (metal)

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gulþą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰĺ̥tom, from *ǵʰelh₃-. Cognate with Old Frisian gold, Old Saxon gold, Old High German gold (German Gold), Old Norse goll, gull (Swedish guld), Dutch goud, Gothic 𐌲𐌿𐌻𐌸 (gulþ). The Indo-European root is also the source of Proto-Slavic *zolto (Old Church Slavonic злато (zlato), Russian зо́лото (zóloto)), Proto-Baltic *želt-, *želtas (Lithuanian žel̃tas, Latvian zelts).

Noun

gold n

  1. gold, riches, treasure
    Abram wæs swiðe welig on golde. Abram was very rich in gold. (Genesis)

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants


Volapük

Etymology

Borrowing from English gold.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡold]

Noun

gold (plural golds)

  1. gold

Declension

Synonyms

Derived terms

See also