Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Slang

Slang

,
imp.
of
Sling
. Slung.
[Archaic]

Slang

,
Noun.
Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.
[Local, Eng.]
Holland.

Slang

,
Noun.
[Cf.
Sling
.]
A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.
[Eng.]

Slang

,
Noun.
[Said to be of Gypsy origin; but probably from Scand., and akin to E.
sling
; cf. Norw.
sleng
a slinging, an invention, device,
slengja
to sling, to cast,
slengja kjeften
(literally, to sling the jaw) to use abusive language, to use slang,
slenjeord
(
ord
= word) an insulting word, a new word that has no just reason for being.]
Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant;
as, the
slang
of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.

Slang

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Slanged
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Slanging
.]
To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.
[Colloq.]
Every gentleman abused by a cabman or
slanged
by a bargee was bound there and then to take off his coat and challenge him to fisticuffs.
London Spectator.

Webster 1828 Edition


Slang

SLANG

, old pret. of sling. We now use slung.

SLANG

,
Noun.
Low vulgar unmeaning language. [Low.]

Definition 2021


Slang

Slang

See also: slang and släng

Dutch

Proper noun

Slang m

  1. (astronomy) Serpens

Related terms


German

Noun

Slang m

  1. slang

Low German

Alternative forms

  • Schlang

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [slaŋk]

Noun

Slang f (plural Slangen)

  1. snake, serpent (Serpentes)

Synonyms

Derived terms

  • Slangkruut

See also

  • Krüüpdeer, Krüüpdeert / Kruupdeer, Kruupdeert
  • Krüüpdeer, Krüüpdeerten / Kruupdeer, Kruupdeerten (Reptilia)
  • Krüüzadder
  • Sünndrang (Anguis)
  • Warveldeerten (Vertebrata)
  • Plautdietsch: Schlang

slang

slang

See also: Slang and släng

English

Noun

slang (countable and uncountable, plural slangs)

  1. Language outside of conventional usage.
  2. Language that is unique to a particular profession or subject; jargon.
  3. The specialized language of a social group, sometimes used to make what is said unintelligible to those not members of the group; cant.
    • 1871–72, George Eliot, Middlemarch, Chapter 11
      "Oh, there are so many superior teas and sugars now. Superior is getting to be shopkeepers' slang."
      "Are you beginning to dislike slang, then?" said Rosamond, with mild gravity.
      "Only the wrong sort. All choice of words is slang. It marks a class."
      "There is correct English: that is not slang."
      "I beg your pardon: correct English is the slang of prigs who write history and essays. And the strongest slang of all is the slang of poets."
Synonyms
Translations

Verb

slang (third-person singular simple present slangs, present participle slanging, simple past and past participle slanged)

  1. (transitive, dated) To vocally abuse, or shout at.
    • 1888, Also, he had to keep his temper when he was slanged in the theatre porch by a policeman — Rudyard Kipling, ‘Miss Youghal's Sais’, Plain Tales from the Hills (Folio Society 2007, p. 26)
See also
  • Category:English slang

Etymology 2

Verb

slang

  1. (archaic) simple past tense of sling
    • 1836, Edward Bagnall, Saul and David
      Before he slang the all-deciding stone []

Etymology 3

Noun

slang (plural slangs)

  1. (Britain, dialect) Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)

Etymology 4

Compare sling.

Noun

slang (plural slangs)

  1. (Britain, obsolete) A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.

External links

  • slang in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • slang in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • slang at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch slang (snake, serpent), from Middle Dutch slange (snake, serpent), from Old Dutch slango (snake, serpent), from Proto-Germanic *slangô (snake, serpent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [slɑŋ]

Noun

slang (plural slange)

  1. snake; serpent
    • 1983, E. P. Groenewald et al. (translators), Bybel, Genesis 3:2:
      Die vrou het die slang geantwoord: “Ons mag eet van die vrugte van die bome in die tuin.
      The woman answered the serpent: “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden.

Related terms

  • grootslang

Cebuano

Etymology

Borrowing from English slang. A misnomer.

Noun

slang

  1. (colloquial, informal) twang, foreign accent

Adjective

slang

  1. (colloquial, informal) (usually of English speakers) Having a regional or foreign accent.

Czech

Noun

slang m

  1. slang

Danish

Etymology

Borrowing from English slang.

Noun

slang c (singular definite slangen or slanget, not used in plural form)

  1. Language outside of conventional usage, slang.

Inflection

Derived terms


Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch slange, from Old Dutch slango, from Proto-Germanic *slangô (snake, serpent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slɑŋ/

Noun

slang f (plural slangen, diminutive slangetje n)

  1. snake
  2. hose (flexible tube)
Synonyms
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From English slang.

Noun

slang n (plural slangs, diminutive slangetje n)

  1. language specific to one social group, slang

Anagrams


French

Etymology

From English slang

Noun

slang m (plural slangs)

  1. English slang
    Twain fut un des premiers auteurs provenant des terres intérieures des États-Unis qui a su capturer la distinction, le slang comique et l'iconoclasme de sa nation.

See also


Limburgish

Etymology 1

From Dutch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [slɑŋ(ɡ)]

Noun

slang f

  1. hose (flexible tube)

Etymology 2

From English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [slæŋ(ɡ)]

Noun

slang f

  1. slang

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From English slang

Noun

slang m (definite singular slangen)

  1. slang (non-standard informal language)
Related terms

Etymology 2

Verb

slang

  1. imperative of slange

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English slang

Noun

slang m (definite singular slangen)

  1. slang (non-standard informal language)

Related terms

References


Polish

Etymology

From English slang.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slank/

Noun

slang m inan

  1. slang (jargon or cant)

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowing from English slang.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slenɡ/

Noun

slang n (plural slanguri)

  1. slang

Declension

Synonyms

  • argou

Swedish

Noun

slang c

  1. hose, tube, flexible pipe
  2. (uncountable) slang (language)

Declension

Inflection of slang 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative slang slangen slangar slangarna
Genitive slangs slangens slangars slangarnas

Tagalog

Noun

slang

  1. (colloquial, informal) A thick foreign accent in English.
    Ayos ka mag-Ingles a, parang Kano, slang na slang!
    That´s some English diction you have, like an American, with their accent!