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Webster 1913 Edition


Skim

Skim

(skĭm)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Skimmed
(skĭmd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Skimming
.]
[Cf. Sw.
skymma
to darken. √158. See
Scum
.]
1.
To clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying thereon, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface;
as, to
skim
milk; to
skim
broth.
2.
To take off by skimming;
as, to
skim
cream
.
3.
To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of.
Homer describes Mercury as flinging himself from the top of Olympus, and
skimming
the surface of the ocean.
Hazlitt.
4.
Fig.: To read or examine superficially and rapidly, in order to cull the principal facts or thoughts;
as, to
skim
a book or a newspaper
.

Skim

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface.
Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain,
Flies o’er the unbending corn, and
skims
along the main.
Pope.
2.
To hasten along with superficial attention.
They
skim
over a science in a very superficial survey.
I. Watts.
3.
To put on the finishing coat of plaster.

Skim

,
Adj.
Contraction of
Skimming
and
Skimmed
.
Skim coat
,
the final or finishing coat of plaster.
Skim colter
,
a colter for paring off the surface of land.
Skim milk
,
skimmed milk; milk from which the cream has been taken.

Webster 1828 Edition


Skim

SKIM

,
Noun.
(a different orthography of scum;
Scum; the thich matter that forms on the surface of a liquor.

Definition 2022


skim

skim

English

Verb

skim (third-person singular simple present skims, present participle skimming, simple past and past participle skimmed)

  1. (intransitive) To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface.
    • Alexander Pope
      Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain, / Flies o'er the unbending corn, and skims along the main.
  2. (transitive) To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of.
    • Hazlitt
      Homer describes Mercury as flinging himself from the top of Olympus, and skimming the surface of the ocean.
  3. To hasten along with superficial attention.
    • I. Watts
      They skim over a science in a very superficial survey.
  4. To put on a finishing coat of plaster.
  5. (transitive) to throw an object so it bounces on water (skimming stones)
  6. (intransitive) to ricochet
  7. (transitive) to read quickly, skipping some detail
    I skimmed the newspaper over breakfast.
  8. (transitive) to scrape off; to remove (something) from a surface
  9. (transitive) to clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying on it, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface.
    to skim milk; to skim broth
  10. (transitive) to clear a liquid from (scum or substance floating or lying on it), especially the cream that floats on top of fresh milk
    to skim cream

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

skim (not comparable)

  1. (of milk) Having lowered fat content.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

skim (plural skims)

  1. A cursory reading, skipping the details.
    • 2012, John Friend, Allen Hickling, Planning Under Pressure (page xxii)
      For a first quick appreciation of the approach, we recommend a fast reading of Chapter 1, then a skim through the figures of the next two chapters — glancing at the definitions of key concepts that appear below the figures in Chapters 2 and 3.
  2. (informal) Skim milk.
    • 2010, Gary G. Kindley, Growing Older Without Fear: The Nine Qualities of Successful Aging
      Two percent milk has only a fraction less fat than whole milk, so unless you are feeding a child or someone whose diet requires whole milk, skim is best.