Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Carouse

Ca-rouse′

(kȧ-rouz′)
,
Noun.
[F.
carrousse
, earlier
carous
, fr. G.
garaus
finishing stroke, the entire emptying of the cup in drinking a health;
gar
entirely +
aus
out. See
Yare
, and
Out
.]
1.
A large draught of liquor.
[Obs.]
“A full carouse of sack.”
Sir J. Davies.
Drink
carouses
to the next day’s fate.
Shakespeare
2.
A drinking match; a carousal.
The early feast and late
carouse
.
Pope.

Ca-rouse′

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Caroused
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Carousing
.]
To drink deeply or freely in compliment; to take part in a carousal; to engage in drunken revels.
He had been aboard,
carousing
to his mates.
Shakespeare

Ca-rouse′

Verb.
T.
To drink up; to drain; to drink freely or jovially.
[Archaic]
Guests
carouse
the sparkling tears of the rich grape.
Denham.
Egypt's wanton queen,
Carousing
gems, herself dissolved in love.
Young.

Webster 1828 Edition


Carouse

CAROUSE

,
Verb.
I.
carouz. To drink hard; to guzzle. In the United States, it signifies also to be noisy, as bacchanalians.

CAROUSE

,
Noun.
A drinking match; a hearty drink or full draught of liquor; a noisy drinking match.

Definition 2022


carouse

carouse

English

Verb

carouse (third-person singular simple present carouses, present participle carousing, simple past and past participle caroused)

  1. (intransitive) To engage in a noisy or drunken social gathering.
    We are all going to carouse at Brian's tonight.
  2. (intransitive) To drink to excess.
    If I survive this headache, I promise no more carousing at Brian's.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

carouse (plural carouses)

  1. A large draught of liquor.
    • Sir J. Davies
      a full carouse of sack
    • Shakespeare
      Drink carouses to the next day's fate.
  2. A drinking match; a carousal.
    • Alexander Pope
      The early feast and late carouse.

Anagrams