Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Drink

Drink

(drĭṉk)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp.
Drank
(drăṉk)
, formerly
Drunk
(drŭṉk)
; &
p. p.
Drunk
,
Drunken
(-’n)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Drinking
. Drunken is now rarely used, except as a verbal adj. in sense of habitually intoxicated; the form drank, not infrequently used as a p. p., is not so analogical.]
[AS.
drincan
; akin to OS.
drinkan
, D.
drinken
, G.
trinken
, Icel.
drekka
, Sw.
dricka
, Dan.
drikke
, Goth.
drigkan
. Cf.
Drench
,
Drunken
,
Drown
.]
1.
To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst;
as, to
drink
from a spring
.
Gird thyself, and serve me, till have eaten and
drunken
; and afterward thou shalt eat and
drink
.
Luke xvii. 8.
He shall
drink
of the wrath the Almighty.
Job xxi. 20.
Drink
of the cup that can not cloy.
Keble.
2.
To quaff exhilarating or intoxicating liquors, in merriment or feasting; to carouse; to revel; hence, to lake alcoholic liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the [GREEK]se of intoxicating or spirituous liquors; to tipple.
Pope.
And they
drank
, and were merry with him.
Gem. xliii. 34.
Bolingbroke always spoke freely when he had
drunk
freely.
Thackeray.
To drink to
,
to salute in drinking; to wish well to, in the act of taking the cup; to pledge in drinking.
I
drink to
the general joy of the whole table,
And to our dear friend Banquo.
Shakespeare

Drink

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To swallow (a liquid); to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; to imbibe;
as, to
drink
milk or water
.
There lies she with the blessed gods in bliss,
There
drinks
the nectar with ambrosia mixed.
Spenser.
The bowl of punch which was brewed and
drunk
in Mrs. Betty’s room.
Thackeray.
2.
To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe.
And let the purple violets
drink
the stream.
Dryden.
3.
To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see.
To
drink
the cooler air,
Tennyson.
My ears have not yet
drunk
a hundred words
Of that tongue's utterance.
Shakespeare
Let me . . .
drink
delicious poison from thy eye.
Pope.
4.
To smoke, as tobacco.
[Obs.]
And some men now live ninety years and past,
Who never
drank
to tobacco first nor last.
Taylor (1630.)
To drink down
,
to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue;
as, to
drink down
unkindness
.
Shak.
To drink in
,
to take into one's self by drinking, or as by drinking; to receive and appropriate as in satisfaction of thirst.
“Song was the form of literature which he [Burns] had drunk in from his cradle.”
J. C. Shairp.
To drink off
or
To drink up
,
to drink completely, especially at one draught;
as, to
drink off
a cup of cordial.
To drink the health of
, or
To drink to the health of
,
to drink while expressing good wishes for the health or welfare of.

Drink

,
Noun.
1.
Liquid to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach for quenching thirst or for other purposes, as water, coffee, or decoctions.
Give me some
drink
, Titinius.
Shakespeare
2.
Specifically, intoxicating liquor;
as, when
drink
is on, wit is out
.
Drink money
, or
Drink penny
,
an allowance, or perquisite, given to buy drink; a gratuity.
Drink offering
(Script.)
,
an offering of wine, etc., in the Jewish religious service.
In drink
,
drunk.
“The poor monster's in drink.”
Shak.
Strong drink
,
intoxicating liquor; esp., liquor containing a large proportion of alcohol.
“ Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging.”
Prov. xx. 1.

Webster 1828 Edition


Drink

DRINK

,
Verb.
I.
pret. and pp. drank. Old pret. And pp. drunk; pp. Drunken. [G. Drink and drench are radically the same word, and probably drown. We observe that n is not radical.]
1.
To swallow liquor, for quenching thirst or other purpose; as, to drink of the brook.
Ye shall indeed drink of my cup. Matthew 20.
2.
To take spirituous liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the use of spirituous liquors; to be a habitual drunkard.
3.
To feast; to be entertained with liquors.
To drink to,
1.
To salute in drinking; to invite to drink by drinking first; as, I drink to you grace.
2.
To wish well to, in the act of taking the cup.

DRINK

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To swallow, as liquids; to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; as, to drink water or wine.
2.
To suck in; to absorb; to imbibe.
And let the purple violets drink the stream.
3.
To take in by any inlet; to hear; to see; as, to drink words or the voice.
I drink delicious poison from thy eye.
4.
To take in air; to inhale.
To drink down, is to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue; as, to drink down unkindness.
To drink off, to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial.
To drink in, to absorb; to take or receive into any inlet.
To drink up, to drink the whole.
To drink health, or to the health, a customary civility in which a person at taking a glass or cup, expresses his respect or kind wishes for another.

DRINK

,
Noun.
Liquor to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach, for quenching thirst, or for medicinal purposes; as water, wine, beer, cider, decoctions, &c.

Definition 2022


Drink

Drink

See also: drink

German

Noun

Drink m (genitive Drinks, plural Drinks)

  1. drink (alcoholic)

Declension

drink

drink

See also: Drink

English

Alternative forms

Verb

drink (third-person singular simple present drinks, present participle drinking, simple past drank or (southern US) drunk or (nonstandard) drinked, past participle drunk or (informal) drank or (nonstandard) drinked or (obsolete or nonstandard) drunken)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To consume (a liquid) through the mouth.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Spenser
      There lies she with the blessed gods in bliss, / There drinks the nectar with ambrosia mixed.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Thackeray
      the bowl of punch which was brewed and drunk in Mrs. Betty's room
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 2, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      That the young Mr. Churchills liked—but they did not like him coming round of an evening and drinking weak whisky-and-water while he held forth on railway debentures and corporation loans. Mr. Barrett, however, by fawning and flattery, seemed to be able to make not only Mrs. Churchill but everyone else do what he desired.
    He drank the water I gave him.
    You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink.
  2. (intransitive) To consume alcoholic beverages.
    You've been drinking, haven't you?
    No thanks, I don't drink.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Thackeray
      Bolingbroke always spoke freely when he had drunk freely.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      I drink to the general joy of the whole table, / And to our dear friend Banquo.
  3. (transitive) To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      Let the purple violets drink the stream.
  4. (transitive) To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Tennyson
      to drink the cooler air
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words / Of that tongue's utterance.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Alexander Pope
      Let me [] drink delicious poison from thy eye.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To smoke, as tobacco.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Taylor (1630)
      And some men now live ninety years and past, / Who never drank tobacco first nor last.
Synonyms
  • (consume (liquid) through the mouth): gulp, imbibe, quaff, sip, see also Wikisaurus:drink
  • (consume alcoholic beverages): drink alcohol, hit the sauce
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English drync, from Proto-Germanic *drunkiz, *drankiz. Compare Dutch drank.

Noun

drink (countable and uncountable, plural drinks)

  1. A beverage.
    I’d like another drink please.
  2. A (served) alcoholic beverage.
    Can I buy you a drink?
  3. The action of drinking, especially with the verbs take or have.
    He was about to take a drink from his root beer.
  4. A type of beverage (usually mixed).
    My favourite drink is the White Russian.
  5. Alcoholic beverages in general.
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 1, in Death on the Centre Court:
      She mixed furniture with the same fatal profligacy as she mixed drinks, and this outrageous contact between things which were intended by Nature to be kept poles apart gave her an inexpressible thrill.
    • 2014 November 14, Blake Bailey, “'Tennessee Williams,' by John Lahr [print version: Theatrical victory of art over life, International New York Times, 18 November 2014, p. 13]”, in The New York Times:
      [] she was indeed Amanda in the flesh: a doughty chatterbox from Ohio who adopted the manner of a Southern belle and eschewed both drink and sex to the greatest extent possible.
  6. (colloquial, with the) Any body of water.
    If he doesn't pay off the mafia, he’ll wear cement shoes to the bottom of the drink!
  7. (uncountable, archaic) Drinks in general; something to drink
    • 1611, Bible (KJV):, Matthew 25:35:
      For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink
Usage notes
Synonyms
  • (served beverage): beverage, see also Wikisaurus:beverage
  • (served alcoholic beverage): beverage, see also Wikisaurus:alcoholic beverage
  • (action of drinking): gulp, sip, swig
  • (type of beverage): beverage
  • (alcoholic beverages in general): alcohol
Derived terms
Translations

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch drinken, from Middle Dutch drinken, from Old Dutch drinkan, from Proto-Germanic *drinkaną.

Verb

drink (present drink, present participle drinkende, past participle gedrink)

  1. to drink

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drɪŋk/

Etymology

From English drink.

Noun

drink m, inanimate

  1. drink (a (mixed) alcoholic beverage)

Declension


Danish

Noun

drink c (singular definite drinken, plural indefinite drinks)

  1. drink; a (mixed) alcoholic beverage

Synonyms

  • sjus c

Inflection


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /drɪŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk

Verb

drink

  1. first-person singular present indicative of drinken
  2. imperative of drinken

French

Etymology

English drink

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʁiŋk/

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. a reception or after party where alcohol is served

Italian

Etymology

From English.

Noun

drink m (invariable)

  1. drink (served beverage and mixed beverage)

Synonyms


Low German

Verb

drink

  1. First-person singular of drinken

Portuguese

Noun

drink m (plural drinks)

  1. Alternative form of drinque

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

drink c

  1. drink; a (mixed) alcoholic beverage

Declension

Inflection of drink 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative drink drinken drinkar drinkarna
Genitive drinks drinkens drinkars drinkarnas

Related terms

  • drinkare