Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Dog

Dog

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Dogged
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Dogging
.]
To hunt or track like a hound; to follow insidiously or indefatigably; to chase with a dog or dogs; to worry, as if by dogs; to hound with importunity.
I have been pursued,
dogged
, and waylaid.
Pope.
Your sins will
dog
you, pursue you.
Burroughs.
Eager ill-bred petitioners, who do not so properly supplicate as hunt the person whom they address to,
dogging
him from place to place, till they even extort an answer to their rude requests.
South.

Webster 1828 Edition


Dog

DOG

,
Noun.
1.
A species of quadrupeds, belonging to the genus Canis, of many varieties, as the mastiff, the hound, the spaniel, the shepherds dog, the terrier, the harrier, the bloodhound, &c.
2.
It is used for male, when applied to several other animals; as a dog-fox; a dog-otter; dog-ape. It is prefixed to other words, denoting what is mean, degenerate or worthless; as dog-rose.
3.
An andiron, so named from the figure of a dogs head on the top.
4.
A term of reproach or contempt given to a man.
5.
A constellation called Sirius or Canicula. [See Dog-day.]
6.
An iron hook or bar with a sharp fang, used by seamen.
7.
An iron used by sawyers to fasten a log of timber in a saw-pit.
8.
A gay young man; a buck. [Not in use.]
To give or throw to the dogs, is to throw away, as useless.
To go to the dogs, is to be ruined.

DOG

,
Verb.
T.
To hunt; to follow insidiously or indefatigably; to follow close; to urge; to worry with importunity.
I have been pursued, dogged and and way-laid.

Definition 2022


Dog

Dog

See also: dog, DOG, and dög

English

Proper noun

Dog

  1. A name given to a dog
    • 1979, Allen Eyles, John Wayne
      He is about to break up a small lynching party down below, thinks better of it (muttering to his dog, called Dog, "No, sir, I ain't")
  2. A nickname given to people, especially tough men
    • 1994, Larry Woody, A Dixie Farewell: The Life and Death of Chucky Mullins
      Brewer, whose coaching nickname is "Dog," recognized that same stubborn, dogged determination in Mullins.
  3. The language supposedly spoken by dogs
    • 2015, Harper Lin, Pawsitively Dead: A Wonder Cats Mystery
      I blinked. “I thought you were talking to Blake about a dog.”
      “Cath,” Jake said, “I'm trying to be more open about this. Didn't you just say that you could talk to animals?”
      The realization dawned on me. “I don't speak Dog very well, but it's worth a try.”
  4. The eleventh of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar.

Synonyms

dog

dog

See also: DOG, Dog, and dög

English

Alternative forms

Noun

dog (plural dogs)

  1. A mammal, Canis lupus familiaris, that has been domesticated for thousands of years, of highly variable appearance due to human breeding.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      The preposterous altruism too! [] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as bad intrinsically as fakirs stabbing themselves or anchorites warping their spines in caves scarcely large enough for a fair-sized dog.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him.  [] . The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain.
    The dog barked all night long.
  2. A male dog, wolf or fox, as opposed to a bitch (often attributive).
    • 1928, Siegfried Sassoon, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man, Penguin 2013, page 149:
      Firstly, he was there to encourage and assist the hounds (a scratch pack – mostly dog-hounds drafted from fox-hound kennels because they were over-sized) […].
  3. (slang, derogatory) A dull, unattractive girl or woman.
    She’s a real dog.
  4. (slang) A man (derived from definition 2).
    You lucky dog!   He's a silly dog.
  5. (slang, derogatory) A coward.
    Come back and fight, you dogs!
  6. (derogatory) Someone who is morally reprehensible.
    • Bible, 2 Kings viii. 13 (Rev. Ver.)
      What is thy servant, which is but a dog, that he should do this great thing?
    • 1599, Robert Greene, Alphonsus, King of Aragon (1599). Act 3.
      Blasphemous dog, I wonder that the earth / Doth cease from renting vnderneath thy feete, / To swallow vp those cankred corpes of thine.
    You dirty dog.
  7. (slang) A sexually aggressive man (cf. horny).
  8. Any of various mechanical devices for holding, gripping, or fastening something, particularly with a tooth-like projection.
  9. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) A click or pallet adapted to engage the teeth of a ratchet-wheel, to restrain the back action; a click or pawl. (See also: ratchet, windlass)
  10. A metal support for logs in a fireplace.
    The dogs were too hot to touch.
  11. A hot dog.
    • 1994 July 21, Faye Fiore, “Congress relishes another franking privilege: Meat lobby puts on the dog with exclusive luncheon for lawmakers – experts on pork”, in Los Angeles Times:
      Congressmen gleefully wolfed down every imaginable version of the hot dog – smoked kielbasas, jumbo grillers, Big & Juicy's, kosher dogs and spiced dogs []
  12. (poker slang) Underdog.
  13. (slang, almost always in the plural) Foot.
    "My dogs are barking!" — "My feet hurt!"

Synonyms

Coordinate terms

Hyponyms

Hypernyms

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

Verb

dog (third-person singular simple present dogs, present participle dogging, simple past and past participle dogged)

  1. (transitive) To pursue with the intent to catch.
  2. (transitive) To follow in an annoying way.
    The woman cursed him so that trouble would dog his every step.
    • 2012 January 1, Michael Riordan, “Tackling Infinity”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 1, page 86:
      Some of the most beautiful and thus appealing physical theories, including quantum electrodynamics and quantum gravity, have been dogged for decades by infinities that erupt when theorists try to prod their calculations into new domains. Getting rid of these nagging infinities has probably occupied far more effort than was spent in originating the theories.
    • 2012 May 9, Jonathan Wilson, “Europa League: Radamel Falcao's Atlético Madrid rout Athletic Bilbao”, in the Guardian:
      But this is not an Athletic that ever looks comfortable at the back – a criticism that has often dogged Marcelo Bielsa's sides.
  3. (transitive, nautical) To fasten a hatch securely.
    It is very important to dog down these hatches...
  4. (intransitive, emerging usage in Britain) To watch, or participate, in sexual activity in a public place.
    I admit that I like to dog at my local country park.
  5. (intransitive, transitive) To intentionally restrict one's productivity as employee; to work at the slowest rate that goes unpunished.
    A surprise inspection of the night shift found that some workers were dogging it.

Synonyms

Translations

Anagrams

See also

References

  1. dog” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Afrikaans

Verb

dog (present dog, present participle dogende, past participle gedog)

  1. Alternative form of dag (preterite of dink)

Danish

Conjunction

dog

  1. though

Kriol

Etymology

From English dog.

Noun

dog

  1. dog

Mbabaram

Etymology

From *dwog(a), from *udwoga, from *gudwaga, from Proto-Pama-Nyungan *gudaga. Related to Dyirbal guda, Yidiny gudaga. (Note that, despite the similarities, this word is not related to English dog.)[1]

Noun

dog

  1. dog

References

  1. Language Hat, excerpting Dixon's Memoirs of a Field Worker

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈdɔɡ/, /ˈdɔ.ɡi/

Noun

dog m (plural dogs)

  1. Short for hot dog.

Swedish

Verb

dog

  1. past tense of .

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English dog.

Noun

dog

  1. dog

Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [doɡ]

Noun

dog (plural dogs)

  1. (male or female) dog

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms