Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Dag

Dag

(dăg)
,
Noun.
[Cf. F.
dague
, LL.
daga
, D.
dagge
(fr. French); all prob. fr. Celtic; Cf. Gael.
dag
a pistol, Armor.
dag
dagger, W.
dager
,
dagr
, Ir.
daigear
. Cf.
Dagger
.]
1.
A dagger; a poniard.
[Obs.]
Johnson.
2.
A large pistol formerly used.
[Obs.]
The Spaniards discharged their
dags
, and hurt some.
Foxe.
A sort of pistol, called
dag
, was used about the same time as hand guns and harquebuts.
Grose.
3.
(Zool.)
The unbranched antler of a young deer.

Dag

,
Noun.
[Of Scand. origin; cf. Sw.
dagg
, Icel.
dögg
. √71. See
Dew
.]
A misty shower; dew.
[Obs.]

Dag

,
Noun.
[OE.
dagge
(cf.
Dagger
); or cf. AS.
dāg
what is dangling.]
A loose end; a dangling shred.
Daglocks, clotted locks hanging in
dags
or jags at a sheep’s tail.
Wedgwood.

Dag

,
Verb.
T.
[1, from
Dag
dew. 2, from
Dag
a loose end.]
1.
To daggle or bemire.
[Prov. Eng.]
Johnson.
2.
To cut into jags or points; to slash;
as, to
dag
a garment
.
[Obs.]
Wright.

Dag

,
Verb.
I.
To be misty; to drizzle.
[Prov. Eng.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Dag

DAG

,
Noun.
A dagger; a hand-gun; a pistol.

DAG

,
Noun.
Dew.

DAG

, n.
1.
a loose end, as of locks of wool; called also dag-locks.
2.
A leather latchet.

DAG

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To daggle.
2.
To cut into slips.

Definition 2019


Dag

Dag

See also: dag, DAG, Dağ, and dağ

German Low German

Noun

Dag m (plural Daag)

  1. (in many dialects, including Low Prussian) day

Derived terms


Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Middle High German dach, from Old High German *dag, northern variant of tag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz. The plural Deeg is derived from the singular with a secondary umlaut. But compare Do, the regular outcome of the older plural and dative singular. Cognate with German Tag, Dutch dag, English day, Icelandic dagur.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /daːχ/
  • Rhymes: -aːχ
  • Homophone: Daach

Noun

Dag m (plural Deeg)

  1. day

Derived terms

Related terms


Norwegian

Etymology

From Old Norse dagr (day), with identical meaning in modern Norwegian.

Proper noun

Dag

  1. A male given name.

Related terms

References

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, ISBN 82-521-4483-7
  • Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 9 774 males with the given name Dag living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak in the 1960s. Accessed on 19 May, 2011.

Pennsylvania German

Noun

Dag m (plural Dag)

  1. Alternative form of Daag
    en paar Dag
    a few days

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse dagr (day), with identical meaning in modern Swedish. A runic name revived since 1863.

Proper noun

Dag

  1. A male given name.

Related terms

dag

dag

See also: DAG, Dag, dağ, and Dağ

Translingual

Symbol

dag

  1. (metrology) Symbol for the decagram, an SI unit of mass equal to 101 grams.

English

Noun

dag (plural dags)

  1. A hanging end or shred, in particular a long pointed strip of cloth at the edge of a piece of clothing, or one of a row of decorative strips of cloth that may ornament a tent, booth or fairground.
  2. A dangling lock of sheep’s wool matted with dung.
    • Wedgwood
      Daglocks, clotted locks hanging in dags or jags at a sheep's tail.
    • 1998, Wool: Volume 8, Issue 10, as published by the Massey Wool Association:
      He was one of the first significant private buyers of wool in New Zealand, playing a major part in bringing respectability to what at first was a very diverse group. He pioneered the pelletising of dag waste.
    • 1999, G. C. Waghorn, N. G. Gregory, S. E. Todd, and R. Wesselink, Dags in sheep; a look at faeces and reasons for dag formation, published in the Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association 61, on pages 4349:
      The development of dags first requires some faeces to adhere to wool, but this is only the initial step in accumulation.
    • 2004, Mette Vaarst, Animal health and welfare in organic agriculture, page 323:
      [...] and the use of tanniferous forages may affect faecal consistency, reducing the formation of dag (faeces-coated wool).
    • 2006, in the compilation of the Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture, volume 46, issues 1-5, published by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (Australia), on page 7:
      [Researchers] note that free pellets are characteristic of healthy sheep and that if sheep consistently produced free pellets, wool staining and dag formation would not occur.
Synonyms
Derived terms

Verb

dag (third-person singular simple present dags, present participle dagging, simple past and past participle dagged)

  1. To shear the hindquarters of a sheep in order to remove dags or prevent their formation.
    • 2007, Graeme R. Quick, Remarkable Australian Farm Machines: Ingenuity on the Land,
      Blade shearers could shear, crutch, mules or dag sheep anywhere they were needed.
    • 2010 January 29, Emma Partridge, Stock Journal, Richie Foster a cut above the rest,
      After learning how to crutch at 13, he could dag 400 sheep in a day by the spring of 1965 and earned himself more than just a bit of pocket money.
  2. To daggle or bemire.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)

Etymology 2

From Old French dague (from Old Provençal dague, of uncertain origin, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *daca (Dacian knife), from the Roman province Dacia (roughly modern Romania); the ending is possibly the faintly pejorative -ard suffix, as in poignard (dagger)); cognate with dagger.

Noun

dag (plural dags)

  1. A skewer.
  2. A spit, a sharpened rod used for roasting food over a fire.
  3. (obsolete) A dagger; a poniard.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  4. (obsolete) A kind of large pistol.
    • Foxe
      The Spaniards discharged their dags, and hurt some.
    • Grose
      A sort of pistol, called dag, was used about the same time as hand guns and harquebuts.
  5. The unbranched antler of a young deer.

Verb

dag (third-person singular simple present dags, present participle dagging, simple past and past participle dagged)

  1. (transitive) To skewer food, for roasting over a fire
  2. (transitive) To cut or slash the edge of a garment into dags

Etymology 3

Variation of dang.

Interjection

dag

  1. (US, informal) Expressing shock, awe or surprise; used as a general intensifier.

Etymology 4

Back-formation from daggy.

Noun

dag (plural dags)

  1. (Australia slang, New Zealand derogatory slang) One who dresses unfashionably or without apparent care about appearance.
    • 2004 July 25, Debbie Kruger, Melbourne Weekly Magazine, All the World's a Stage,
      Now, wide-eyed and unfashionably excited ("I’m such a dag!" she remarks several times), she has the leading role of Viola in the Bell Shakespeare Company’s production of Twelfth Night, opening on August 10 at the Victorian Arts Centre Playhouse.
    • 2006 September 26, TV Week, Klancie Keough eliminated,
      What did you think about Mark calling you a dag?
      To me a dag is a person who doesn't have a lot of pride in their appearance or the way they present themselves — the way they sing and how they hold themselves basically. But it didn't really bother me. He said, "You're such a dag, you're cool." I took it as "you're a laidback person". The way they cut it and edited it made it sound on TV like I was grumpy about it, but I wasn't. It was pretty funny how it came across.
    • 2009 November 14, Daily Telegraph, Catherine Zeta - Hollywood's biggest dag?,
      SHE is one of Hollywood's most beautiful leading ladies and has access to any fashion designers, so then why is Catherine Zeta-Jones dressing like a bag lady?
    • 2010 January 15, Michael Dwyer, The Age, Talented dag plucks up the cool,
      A graduate of film studies in New York, May has had a hand in editing two of his three videos. Each casts him as a bespectacled dag in a world of glamour.
Related terms
Synonyms
Usage notes
Translations

Etymology 5

Initialism for directed acyclic graph.

Noun

dag (plural dags)

  1. (graph theory) A directed acyclic graph; an ordered pair such that is a subset of some partial ordering relation on .

Etymology 6

Of North Germanic origin; compare Swedish dagg. See dew.

Noun

dag (plural dags)

  1. A misty shower; dew.

Etymology 7

Verb

dag (third-person singular simple present dags, present participle dagging, simple past and past participle dagged)

  1. (Britain, dialect) To be misty; to drizzle.

Etymology 8

Noun

dag (plural dags)

  1. (chiefly Ireland) Eye dialect spelling of dog.
    • 2000, Guy Ritchie, Snatch, quoted in, Miguel Á. Bernal-Merino, Translation and Localisation in Video Games: Making Entertainment Software Global, Routledge (ISBN 9781317617846), page 68:
      Mickey: Dags! D' ya like dags?
    • 2014, John P Brady, Back to the Gaff, Roadside Fiction (ISBN 9780992932305), page 131:
      There it was again, that old Gaelic verb pronounced 'scriss,' that those involved in fighting talk apparently exuded on occasion. It could have been 'D'ya wanna buy a dag?' it was all the same.

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology 1

From Dutch dag (day), cognate with German Tag.

Noun

dag (plural dae, diminutive daggie)

  1. a day

Etymology 2

From Dutch dag, shortening of goedendag (goodday; goodbye), from goed (goed, pleasant) + dag (day).

Interjection

dag

  1. hello!
  2. bye-bye!

Etymology 3

From Dutch dacht.

Alternative forms

Verb

dag

  1. preterite of dink

Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish dagh, from Old Norse dagr, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz (day), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̥æː/
  • Rhymes: -æː

Noun

dag c (singular definite dagen, plural indefinite dage)

  1. day

Declension

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɑx/
  • Rhymes: -ɑx

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch dach, from Old Dutch dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn, to be illuminated). Cognate with German Tag, West Frisian dei, English day, Danish dag.

Noun

dag m (plural dagen, diminutive dagje n or daagje n)

  1. day (period of 24 hours)
  2. daytime (time between sunrise and sunset)
Usage notes
  • In archaic or dialectal usage, the older plural form daag may occur after numerals. On rare occasions the expression veertien daag (a fortnight) is still found in contemporary standard Dutch.
Synonyms
Derived terms

Interjection

dag!

  1. hello, short for goedendag (good day) 'goodday; goodbye'
  2. goodbye, same shortening
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Unknown

Alternative forms

Noun

dag f (plural daggen, diminutive dagje n)

  1. A piece of rope, used to punish sailors with, on the spot or in running the gauntlet
  2. A line used to fasten young sailors while training boarding a hostile ship or climbing the rigging
Synonyms
  • (punitive rope): dagtouwtje n
Derived terms
  • handdag

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛaː/

Noun

dag

  1. accusative singular of dagur

Derived terms


Gothic

Romanization

dag

  1. Romanization of 𐌳𐌰𐌲

Icelandic

Noun

dag

  1. indefinite accusative singular of dagur

Indonesian

Etymology

Borrowing from Dutch dag, from goedendag (goodday).

Interjection

dag

  1. hello
  2. bye

Lojban

Rafsi

dag

  1. rafsi of dargu.

Middle Low German

Noun

dag

  1. Alternative spelling of dach.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse dagr, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn, to be illuminated).

Noun

dag m (definite singular dagen, indefinite plural dager, definite plural dagene)

  1. a day
  2. the period of time between sunrise and sunset, daytime

Related terms

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse dagr, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn, to be illuminated).

Noun

dag m (definite singular dagen, indefinite plural dagar, definite plural dagane)

  1. a day
  2. the period of time between sunrise and sunset, daytime

Related terms

Derived terms

References


Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn, to be illuminated).

Noun

dag m

  1. day

Declension

Descendants


Old English

Noun

dāg m

  1. Alternative form of dāh

Old Norse

Noun

dag

  1. accusative singular of dagr

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *dagaz, (compare Old English dæġ, Old Dutch dag, Old High German tag, Old Frisian dei, Old Norse dagr), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn, to be illuminated).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /daɣ/

Noun

dag m

  1. day

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: dach
    • Dutch Low Saxon: dag
    • German Low German: Dag

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish dagher, from Old Norse dagr, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn, to be illuminated).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɑː(ɡ)/

Noun

dag c

  1. a day
  2. a day, the period of time between sunrise and sunset, daytime

Declension

Inflection of dag 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative dag dagen dagar dagarna
Genitive dags dagens dagars dagarnas

Derived terms

References


Turkmen

Etymology

From Old Turkic tag, from Proto-Turkic *tāg, *dāg (mountain).

Noun

dag (definite accusative dagy, plural daglar)

  1. mountain

Declension


Volapük

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dag/

Etymology

Borrowing from English dark.

Noun

dag (plural dags)

  1. darkness
    • 1952, Gospul ma ‚Matthaeus‛, 8.11,12, translated by Arie de Jong.
      «Sagob oles, das mödikans okömoms se lofüd e se vesüd, ed olenseadons ko ‚Abraham‛, ‚Isaac‛ e ‚Iacob‛ in regän sülas;
      du sons regäna posejedoms ini dag plödikün; us odabinons viam e knir tutas».
      "I say to you, that many will come from the east and from the west, and they shall sit together with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven;
      while the sons of the kingdom will be thrown out in the outmost darkness; over there will be woeful crying and the gnashing of teeth."
    • 1958, Johann Schmidt, "Viol", Volapükagased, no. 4, 18.
      Viol floron in jad e dag,
      A violet flowers in the shade and darkness,

Declension


White Hmong

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d̪a̤˧˩/

Verb

dag

  1. to deceive
  2. to cheat
  3. to lie (tell untruth(s))

References

  • Ernest E. Heimbach, White Hmong - English Dictionary (1979, SEAP Publications)