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Webster 1913 Edition


Dung

Dung

(dŭng)
,
Noun.
[AS.
dung
; akin to G.
dung
,
dünger
, OHG.
tunga
, Sw.
dynga
; cf. Icel.
dyngja
heap, Dan.
dynge
, MHG.
tunc
underground dwelling place, orig., covered with dung. Cf.
Dingy
.]
The excrement of an animal.
Bacon.

Dung

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Dunged
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Dunging
.]
1.
To manure with dung.
Dryden.
2.
(Calico Print.)
To immerse or steep, as calico, in a bath of hot water containing cow dung; – done to remove the superfluous mordant.

Dung

,
Verb.
I.
To void excrement.
Swift.

Webster 1828 Edition


Dung

DUNG

,
Noun.
[G.] The excrement of animals.

DUNG

,
Verb.
T.
To manure with dung.

DUNG

,
Verb.
I.
To void excrement.

Definition 2022


Dung

Dung

See also: dung, dùng, dừng, đúng, and dūŋ

German

Noun

Dung m (genitive Dungs or Dunges, no plural)

  1. dung

Declension

Derived terms

dung

dung

See also: Dung, dùng, dừng, đúng, and dūŋ

English

Noun

dung (countable and uncountable, plural dungs)

  1. (uncountable) Manure; animal excrement.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear, act III, scene iv, line 129
      Poor Tom, that eats the swimming frog, the toad, the todpole, the wall-newt, and the water; that in the fury of his heart, when the foul fiend rages, eats cow-dung for sallets; swallows the old rat and the ditch-dog; drinks the green mantle of the standing pool []
    • 1611, Authorized King James Version, Malachi 2:3
      Behold, I will corrupt your seed, and spread dung upon your faces, even the dung of your solemn feasts; and one shall take you away with it.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 4, page 496
      The labourer at the dung cart is paid at 3d. or 4d. a day; and on one estate, Lullington, scattering dung is paid a 5d. the hundred heaps.
  2. (countable) A type of manure, as from a particular species or type of animal.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

dung (third-person singular simple present dungs, present participle dunging, simple past and past participle dunged)

  1. (transitive) To fertilize with dung.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of John Dryden to this entry?)
    • 1993, Henry Leach, Endure No Makeshifts: Some Naval Recollections
      She had been dunging the roses and was fairly covered in muck.
  2. (transitive, calico printing) To immerse or steep, as calico, in a bath of hot water containing cow dung, done to remove the superfluous mordant.
  3. (intransitive) To void excrement.
Translations

Etymology 2

See ding

Verb

dung

  1. (obsolete) past participle of ding

Etymology 3

unknown

Verb

dung (third-person singular simple present dungs, present participle dunging, simple past and past participle dunged)

  1. (colloquial) To discard (especially rubbish); to chuck out.

Old English

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *dungz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- (to cover; covering)

Alternative forms

Noun

dung f

  1. dungeon, prison
Declension
Synonyms
  • dimhūs

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *dungō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- (to cover).

Alternative forms

Noun

dung f

  1. dung, manure
Declension

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *dungiz, *dungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰengʰ- (to cover).

Noun

dung m, f

  1. weaving, weavingroom