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Webster 1913 Edition


Estate

Es-tate′

(ĕs-tāt′)
,
Noun.
[OF.
estat
, F.
état
, L.
status
, fr.
stare
to stand. See
Stand
, and cf.
State
.]
1.
Settled condition or form of existence; state; condition or circumstances of life or of any person; situation.
“When I came to man’s estate.”
Shak.
Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low
estate
.
Romans xii. 16.
2.
Social standing or rank; quality; dignity.
God hath imprinted his authority in several parts, upon several
estates
of men.
Jer. Taylor.
3.
A person of high rank.
[Obs.]
She's a duchess, a great
estate
.
Latimer.
Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief
estates
of Galilee.
Mark vi. 21.
4.
A property which a person possesses; a fortune; possessions, esp. property in land; also, property of all kinds which a person leaves to be divided at his death.
See what a vast
estate
he left his son.
Dryden.
5.
The state; the general body politic; the common-wealth; the general interest; state affairs.
[Obs.]
I call matters of
estate
not only the parts of sovereignty, but whatsoever . . . concerneth manifestly any great portion of people.
Bacon.
6.
pl.
The great classes or orders of a community or state (as the clergy, the nobility, and the commonalty of England) or their representatives who administer the government;
as, the
estates
of the realm (England), which are (1) the lords spiritual, (2) the lords temporal, (3) the commons
.
7.
(Law)
The degree, quality, nature, and extent of one's interest in, or ownership of, lands, tenements, etc.;
as, an
estate
for life, for years, at will, etc.
Abbott.
The fourth estate
,
a name often given to the public press.

Es-tate′

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To establish.
[Obs.]
Beau. & Fl.
2.
Tom settle as a fortune.
[Archaic]
Shak.
3.
To endow with an estate.
[Archaic]

Webster 1828 Edition


Estate

ESTA'TE

,
Noun.
[L. status, from sto, to stand. The roots stb, std and stg, have nearly the same signification, to set, to fix. It is probable that the L. sto is contracted from stad, as it forms steti.
1.
In a general sense, fixedness; a fixed condition; now generally written and pronounced state.
She cast us headlong from our high estate.
2.
Condition or circumstances of any person or thing, whether high or low. Luke 1.
3.
Rank; quality.
Who hath not heard of the greatness of your estate?
4.
In law, the interest, or quantity of interest, a man has in lands, tenements, or other effects. Estates are real or personal. Real estate consists in lands or freeholds, which descent to heirs; personal estate consists in chattels or movables, which go to executors and administrators. There are also estates for life, for years, at will, &c.
5.
Fortune; possessions; property in general. He is a man of a great estate. He left his estate unincumbered.
6.
The general business or interest of government; hence, a political body; a commonwealth; a republic. But in this sense, we now use State.
Estates, in the plural, dominions; possessions of a prince.
1.
Orders or classes of men in society or government. Herod made a supper for his chief estates. Mark 6.
In Great Britain, the estates of the realm are the king, lords and commons; or rather the lords and commons.

ESTA'TE

,
Verb.
T.
To settle as a fortune. [Little used.]
1.
To establish. [Little used.]

Definition 2022


estate

estate

English

Noun

estate (plural estates)

  1. (now rare, archaic) State; condition. [from 13thc.]
  2. (archaic) Status, rank. [from 13thc.]
    • Jeremy Taylor (1613–1677)
      God hath imprinted his authority in several parts, upon several estates of men.
  3. (archaic) The condition of one's fortunes; prosperity, possessions. [from 14thc.]
  4. (obsolete) A "person of estate"; a nobleman or noblewoman. [14th-17thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xj, in Le Morte Darthur, book XVI:
      And anone came oute of a chamber to hym the fayrest lady that euer he sawe & more rycher bysene than euer he sawe Quene Gueneuer or ony other estat Lo sayd they syre Bors here is the lady vnto whome we owe alle oure seruyse / and I trowe she be the rychest lady and the fayrest of alle the world
    • Bible, Mark vi. 21
      Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee.
    • Walter Landor (1775-1864)
      She's a duchess, a great estate.
  5. (historical) A major social class or order of persons regarded collectively as part of the body politic of the country and formerly possessing distinct political rights (Estates of the realm). [from 14thc.]
    • 1992, Hilary Mantel, A Place of Greater Safety, Harper Perennial 2007, p.115:
      I am afraid that some of the nobles who are campaigning for it simply want to use the Estates to cut down the King's power and increase their own.
    • 2011, Norman Davies, Vanished Kingdoms, Penguin 2012, p.202:
      The three estates of feudal lords, clergy and royal officers met in separate chambers, and exercised an advisory role.
  6. (law) The nature and extent of a person's interest in, or ownership of, land. [from 15thc.]
  7. An (especially extensive) area of land, under a single ownership. [from 18thc.]
    • 2014 September 7, “Doddington's garden pyramid is a folly good show: The owners of a Lincolnshire stately home have brought the folly into the 21st century, by building a 30ft pyramid [print edition: Great pyramid of Lincolnshire, 6 September 2014, p. G2]”, in The Daily Telegraph, London:
      It has been a long time since new follies were springing up across the great estates of Britain. But the owners of Doddington Hall, in Lincolnshire, have brought the folly into the 21st century, by building a 30ft pyramid in the grounds of the Elizabethan manor.
  8. The collective property and liabilities of someone, especially a deceased person. [from 19thc.]
  9. (Britain, sometimes pejorative) A housing estate. [from 20thc.]
    • 2012 October 19, McDermott, Josephine, “London's new housing loses the 'dirty word'”, in BBC News:
      Professor Loretta Lees from King's College London's geography department says, "The word 'estate' has become synonymous with the term 'ghetto'. It's become a dirty word. Back in the '20s and '30s it didn't carry the same stigma."
  10. (Britain, automotive) A station wagon; a car with a tailgate (or liftgate) and storage space to the rear of the seating which is coterminous with the passenger compartment (and often extensible into that compartment via folding or removable seating). [from 20thc.]
  11. (obsolete) The state; the general body politic; the common-wealth; the general interest; state affairs.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      I call matters of estate not only the parts of sovereignty, but whatsoever [] concerneth manifestly any great portion of people.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Anagrams


Interlingua

Etymology

From Italian.

Noun

estate (plural estates)

  1. summer

See also

Seasons in Interlingua · stationes del anno (layout · text)
primavera (spring) estate (summer) autumno (autumn) hiberno (winter)

Italian

Etymology

From Latin aestātem, accusative of aestās (summer), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eydʰ- (burn; fire).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈta.te/, [es̪ˈt̪äːt̪e̞]
  • Hyphenation: es‧tà‧te

Noun

estate f (plural estati)

  1. summer

Related terms

See also

Seasons in Italian · stagioni (layout · text)
primavera (spring) estate (summer) autunno (autumn) inverno (winter)

Anagrams


Novial

Noun

estate (plural estates)

  1. estate

Spanish

Verb

estate

  1. Compound of the informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of estar, está and the pronoun te.