Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Stand

Stand

(stănd)
,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Stood
(stoŏd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Standing
.]
[OE.
standen
; AS.
standan
; akin to OFries.
stonda
,
stān
, D.
staan
, OS.
standan
,
stān
, OHG.
stantan
,
stān
, G.
stehen
, Icel.
standa
, Dan.
staae
, Sw.
stå
, Goth.
standan
, Russ.
stoiate
, L.
stare
, Gr.
ἰστάναι
to cause to stand,
στῆναι
to stand, Skr.
sthā
. √163. Cf.
Assist
,
Constant
,
Contrast
,
Desist
,
Destine
,
Ecstasy
,
Exist
,
Interstice
,
Obstacle
,
Obstinate
,
Prest
,
Noun.
,
Rest
remainder,
Solstice
,
Stable
,
Adj.
&
Noun.
,
Staff
,
Stage
,
Stall
,
Noun.
,
Stamen
,
Stanchion
,
Stanza
,
State
,
Noun.
,
Statute
,
Stead
,
Steed
,
Stool
,
Stud
of horses,
Substance
,
System
.]
1.
To be at rest in an erect position; to be fixed in an upright or firm position
; as:
(a)
To be supported on the feet, in an erect or nearly erect position; – opposed to
lie
,
sit
,
kneel
, etc.
“I pray you all, stand up!”
Shak.
(b)
To continue upright in a certain locality, as a tree fixed by the roots, or a building resting on its foundation.
It
stands
as it were to the ground yglued.
Chaucer.
The ruined wall
Stands
when its wind-worn battlements are gone.
Byron.
2.
To occupy or hold a place; to have a situation; to be situated or located;
as, Paris
stands
on the Seine
.
Wite ye not where there
stands
a little town?
Chaucer.
3.
To cease from progress; not to proceed; to stop; to pause; to halt; to remain stationary.
I charge thee,
stand
,
And tell thy name.
Dryden.
The star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and
stood
over where the young child was.
Matt. ii. 9.
4.
To remain without ruin or injury; to hold good against tendencies to impair or injure; to be permanent; to endure; to last; hence, to find endurance, strength, or resources.
My mind on its own center
stands
unmoved.
Dryden.
5.
To maintain one’s ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe.
Readers by whose judgment I would
stand
or fall.
Spectator.
6.
To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition.
“The standing pattern of their imitation.”
South.
The king granted the Jews . . . to gather themselves together, and to
stand
for their life.
Esther viii. 11.
7.
To adhere to fixed principles; to maintain moral rectitude; to keep from falling into error or vice.
We must labor so as to
stand
with godliness, according to his appointment.
Latimer.
8.
To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation;
as, Christian charity, or love,
stands
first in the rank of gifts
.
9.
To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist.
“Sacrifices . . . which stood only in meats and drinks.”
Heb. ix. 10.
Accomplish what your signs foreshow;
I
stand
resigned, and am prepared to go.
Dryden.
Thou seest how it
stands
with me, and that I may not tarry.
Sir W. Scott.
10.
To be consistent; to agree; to accord.
Doubt me not; by heaven, I will do nothing
But what may
stand
with honor.
Massinger.
11.
(Naut.)
To hold a course at sea;
as, to
stand
from the shore; to
stand
for the harbor
.
From the same parts of heaven his navy
stands
.
Dryden.
12.
To offer one's self, or to be offered, as a candidate.
He
stood
to be elected one of the proctors of the university.
Walton.
13.
To stagnate; not to flow; to be motionless.
Or the black water of Pomptina
stands
.
Dryden.
14.
To measure when erect on the feet.
Six feet two, as I think, he
stands
.
Tennyson.
15.
(Law)
(a)
To be or remain as it is; to continue in force; to have efficacy or validity; to abide.
Bouvier.
(b)
To appear in court.
Burrill.
Stand by
(Naut.)
,
a preparatory order, equivalent to
Be ready
.
To stand against
,
to oppose; to resist.
To stand by
.
(a)
To be near; to be a spectator; to be present
.
(b)
To be aside; to be set aside with disregard
. “In the interim [we] let the commands stand by neglected.”
Dr. H. More.
(c)
To maintain; to defend; to support; not to desert;
as,
to stand by
one's principles or party
.
(d)
To rest on for support; to be supported by
.
Whitgift.
(e)
To remain as a spectator, and take no part in an action;
as, we can't just
stand
idly
by
while people are being killed
.
To stand corrected
,
to be set right, as after an error in a statement of fact; to admit having been in error.
Wycherley.
To stand fast
,
to be fixed; to be unshaken or immovable.
To stand firmly on
,
to be satisfied or convinced of.
“Though Page be a secure fool, and stands so firmly on his wife's frailty.”
Shak.
To stand for
.
(a)
To side with; to espouse the cause of; to support; to maintain, or to profess or attempt to maintain; to defend.
“I stand wholly for you.”
Shak.
(b)
To be in the place of; to be the substitute or representative of; to represent;
as, a cipher at the left hand of a figure
stands for
nothing
.
“I will not trouble myself, whether these names stand for the same thing, or really include one another.”
Locke.
(c)
To tolerate;
as, I won't
stand for
any delay
.
To stand in
,
to cost.
“The same standeth them in much less cost.”
Robynson (More's Utopia).


The Punic wars could not have
stood
the human race
in
less than three millions of the species.
Burke.


To stand in hand
,
to conduce to one's interest; to be serviceable or advantageous.
To stand off
.
(a)
To keep at a distance
.
(b)
Not to comply
.
(c)
To keep at a distance in friendship, social intercourse, or acquaintance
.
(d)
To appear prominent; to have relief
. “Picture is best when it standeth off, as if it were carved.”
Sir H. Wotton.
To stand off and on
(Naut.)
,
to remain near a coast by sailing toward land and then from it.
To stand on
(Naut.)
,
to continue on the same tack or course.
To stand out
.
(a)
To project; to be prominent
. “Their eyes stand out with fatness.”
Psalm lxxiii. 7.
(b)
To persist in opposition or resistance; not to yield or comply; not to give way or recede.


His spirit is come in,
That so
stood out
against the holy church.
Shakespeare


To stand to
.
(a)
To ply; to urge; to persevere in using
. “Stand to your tackles, mates, and stretch your oars.”
Dryden.
(b)
To remain fixed in a purpose or opinion.
“I will stand to it, that this is his sense.”
Bp. Stillingfleet.
(c)
To abide by; to adhere to; as to a contract, assertion, promise, etc.;
as,
to stand to
an award;
to stand to
one's word
.
(d)
Not to yield; not to fly; to maintain, as one's ground
. “Their lives and fortunes were put in safety, whether they stood to it or ran away.”
Bacon.
(e)
To be consistent with; to agree with;
as, it
stands to
reason that he could not have done so
; same as
stand with
, below .
(f)
To support; to uphold
. “Stand to me in this cause.”
Shak.
To stand together
,
to be consistent; to agree.
To stand to reason
to be reasonable; to be expected.
To stand to sea
(Naut.)
,
to direct the course from land.
To stand under
,
to undergo; to withstand.
Shak.
To stand up
.
(a)
To rise from sitting; to be on the feet
.
(b)
To arise in order to speak or act
. “Against whom, when the accusers stood up, they brought none accusation of such things as I supposed.”
Acts xxv. 18.
(c)
To rise and stand on end, as the hair.
(d)
To put one's self in opposition; to contend
. “Once we stood up about the corn.”
Shak.
To stand up for
,
to defend; to justify; to support, or attempt to support;
as,
to stand up for
the administration
.
To stand upon
.
(a)
To concern; to interest
.
(b)
To value; to esteem
. “We highly esteem and stand much upon our birth.”
Ray.
(c)
To insist on; to attach much importance to;
as,
to stand upon
security;
to stand upon
ceremony
.
(d)
To attack; to assault.
[A Hebraism]
“So I stood upon him, and slew him.”
2 Sam. i. 10.
To stand with
,
to be consistent with.
“It stands with reason that they should be rewarded liberally.”
Sir J. Davies.

Stand

(stănd)
,
Verb.
T.
1.
To endure; to sustain; to bear;
as, I can not
stand
the cold or the heat
.
2.
To resist, without yielding or receding; to withstand.
“Love stood the siege.”
Dryden.
He
stood
the furious foe.
Pope.
3.
To abide by; to submit to; to suffer.
Bid him disband his legions, . . .
And
stand
the judgment of a Roman senate.
Addison.
4.
To set upright; to cause to stand;
as, to
stand
a book on the shelf; to
stand
a man on his feet
.
5.
To be at the expense of; to pay for;
as, to
stand
a treat
.
[Colloq.]
Thackeray.
To stand fire
,
to receive the fire of arms from an enemy without giving way.
To stand one's ground
,
to keep the ground or station one has taken; to maintain one's position.
“Peasants and burghers, however brave, are unable to stand their ground against veteran soldiers.”
Macaulay.
To stand trial
,
to sustain the trial or examination of a cause; not to give up without trial.

Stand

(stănd)
,
Noun.
[AS.
stand
. See
Stand
,
Verb.
I.
]
1.
The act of standing.
I took my
stand
upon an eminence . . . to look into their several ladings.
Spectator.
2.
A halt or stop for the purpose of defense, resistance, or opposition;
as, to come to, or to make, a
stand
.
Vice is at
stand
, and at the highest flow.
Dryden.
3.
A place or post where one stands; a place where one may stand while observing or waiting for something.
I have found you out a
stand
most fit,
Where you may have such vantage on the duke,
He shall not pass you.
Shakespeare
4.
A station in a city or town where carriages or wagons stand for hire;
as, a cab
stand
.
Dickens.
5.
A raised platform or station where a race or other outdoor spectacle may be viewed;
as, the judge's or the grand
stand
at a race course
.
6.
A small table; also, something on or in which anything may be laid, hung, or placed upright;
as, a hat
stand
; an umbrella
stand
; a music
stand
.
7.
The place where a witness stands to testify in court.
8.
The situation of a shop, store, hotel, etc.;
as, a good, bad, or convenient
stand
for business
.
[U. S.]
9.
Rank; post; station; standing.
Father, since your fortune did attain
So high a
stand
, I mean not to descend.
Daniel.
10.
A state of perplexity or embarrassment;
as, to be at a
stand
what to do
.
L'Estrange.
11.
A young tree, usually reserved when other trees are cut; also, a tree growing or standing upon its own root, in distinction from one produced from a scion set in a stock, either of the same or another kind of tree.
12.
(Com.)
A weight of from two hundred and fifty to three hundred pounds, – used in weighing pitch.
Microscope stand
,
the instrument, excepting the eyepiece, objective, and other removable optical parts.
Stand of ammunition
,
the projectile, cartridge, and sabot connected together.
Stand of arms
.
(Mil.)
See under
Arms
.
Stand of colors
(Mil.)
,
a single color, or flag.
Wilhelm (Mil. Dict.)
To be at a stand
,
to be stationary or motionless; to be at a standstill; hence, to be perplexed; to be embarrassed.
To make a stand
,
to halt for the purpose of offering resistance to a pursuing enemy.
Syn. – Stop; halt; rest; interruption; obstruction; perplexity; difficulty; embarrassment; hesitation.

Webster 1828 Edition


Stand

STAND

,
Verb.
I.
pret. and pp. stood. [This verb, if from the root of G., is a derivative from the noun, which is formed from the participle of the original verb. In this case, the noun should properly precede the verb. It may be here remarked that if stan is the radical word, stand and L. Sto cannot be from the same stock. But stand in the pret. is stood, and sto forms steti. This induces a suspicion that stan is not the root of stand, but that n is casual. I am inclined however to believe these words to be from different roots. The Russ. Stoyu, to stand, is the L. sto, but it signifies also to be, to exist, being the substantive verb.]
1.
To be upon the feet, as an animal; not to sit, kneel or lie.
The absolution to be pronounced by the priest alone, standing.
And the king turned his face about and blessed all the congregation of Israel, and all the congregation of Israel stood. 1 Kings 8.
2.
To be erect, supported by the roots, as a tree or other plant. Notwithstanding the violence of the wind, the tree yet stands.
3.
To be on its foundation; not to be overthrown or demolished; as, an old castle is yet standing.
4.
To be placed or situated; to have a certain position or location. Paris stands on the Seine. London stands on the Thames.
5.
To remain upright, in a moral sense; not to fall.
To stand or fall, free in thy own arbitrement it lies.
6.
To become erect.
Mute and amazd, my hair with horror stood.
7.
To stop; to halt; not to proceed.
I charge thee, stand, and tell thy name.
8.
To stop; to be at a stationary point.
Say, at what part of nature will they stand?
9.
To be in a state of fixedness; hence, to continue; to endure. Our constitution has stood nearly forty years. It is hoped it will stand for ages.
Commonwealth by virtue ever stood.
10.
To be fixed or steady; not to vacillate. His mind stands unmoved.
11.
To be in or to maintain a posture of resistance or defense. Approach with charged bayonets; the enemy will not stand.
The king granted the Jews to stand for their life. Esther 8.
12.
To be placed with regard to order or rank. Note the letter that stands first in order. Gen. Washington stood highest in public estimation. Christian charity stands first in the rank of gracious affections.
13.
To be in particular state; to be, emphatically expressed, that is, to be fixed or set; the primary sense of the substantive verb. How does the value of wheat stand? God stands in no need of our services, but we always stand in need of his aid and his mercy.
Accomplish what your signs foreshow; I stand resignd.
14.
To continue unchanged or valid; not to fail or become void.
No condition of our peace can stand.
My mercy will I keep for him, and my covenant shall stand fast with him. Psalm 89.
15.
To consist; to have its being and essence.
Sacrifices--which stood only in meats and drinks. Hebrews 9.
16.
To have a place.
This excellent man, who stood not on the advantage-ground before, provoked men of all qualities.
17.
To be in any state. Let us see how our matters stand.
As things now stand with us--
18.
To be in particular respect or relation; as, to stand godfather to one. We ought to act according to the relation we stand in towards each other.
19.
To be, with regard to state of mind.
Stand in awe, and sin not. Psalm 4.
20.
To succeed; to maintain ones ground; not to fail; to be acquitted; to be safe.
Readers by whose judgment I would stand or fall--
21.
To hold a course at sea; as, to stand from the shore; to stand for the harbor.
From the same parts of heavn his navy stands.
22.
To have a direction.
The wand did not really stand to the metal, when placed under it.
23.
To offer ones self as a candidate.
He stood to be elected one of the proctors of the university.
24.
To place ones self; to be placed.
I stood between the Lord and you at that time-- Deuteronomy 5.
25.
To stagnate; not to flow.
--Or the black water of Pomptina stands.
26.
To be satisfied or convinced.
Though Page be a secure fool, and stand so firmly on his wifes frailty--
27.
To make delay. I cannot stand to examine every particular.
28.
To persist; to persevere.
Never stand in a lie when thou art accused.
29.
To adhere; to abide.
Despair would stand to the sword.
30.
To be permanent; to endure; not to vanish or fade ; as, the color will stand.
To stand by,
1.
To be near; to be a spectator; to be present. I stood by when the operation was performed. This phrase generally implies that the person is inactive, or takes no part in what is done. In seamens language, to stand by is to attend and be ready. Stand by the haliards.
2.
To be aside; to be placed aside with disregard.
In the mean time, we let the commands stand by neglected.
3.
To maintain; to defend; to support; not to desert. I will stand by my friend to the last. Let us stand by our country. To stand by the Arundelian marbles, in Pope, is to defend or support their genuineness.
4.
To rest on for support; to be supported.
This reply standeth by conjecture.
To stand for,
1.
To offer ones self as a candidate.
How many stand for consulships?--Three.
2.
To side with; to support; to maintain, or to profess or attempt to maintain. We all stand for freedom, for our rights or claims.
3.
To be in the place of; to be the substitute or representative of. A cipher at the left hand of a figure stands for nothing.
I will not trouble myself, whether these names stand for the same thing, or really include one another.
4.
In seamens language, to direct the course towards.
To stand from, to direct the course from.
To stand one in, to cost. The coat stands him in twenty dollars.
To stand in, or stand in for, in seamens language, is to direct a course towards land or a harbor.
To stand off,
1.
To keep at a distance.
2.
Not to comply.
3.
To keep at a distance in friendship or social intercourse; to forbear intimacy.
We stand off from an acquaintance with God.
4.
To appear prominent; to have relief.
Picture is best when it standeth off, as if it were carved.
To stand off, or off from, in seamens language, is to direct the course from land.
To stand off and on, is to sail towards land and then from it.
To stand out,
1.
To project; to be prominent.
Their eyes stand out with fatness. Psalm 73.
2.
To persist in opposition or resistance; not to yield or comply; not to give way or recede.
His spirit is come in, that so stood out against the holy church.
3.
With seamen, to direct the course from land or a harbor.
To stand to,
1.
To ply; to urge efforts; to persevere.
Stand to your tackles, mates, and stretch your oars.
2.
To remain fixed in a purpose or opinion.
I still stand to it, that this is his sense.
3.
To abide by; to adhere; as to a contract, assertion, promise, &c.; as, to stand to an award; to stand to ones word.
4.
Not to yield; not to fly; to maintain the ground.
Their lives and fortunes were put in safety, whether they stood to it or ran away.
To stand to sea, to direct the course from land.
To stand under, to undergo; to sustain.
To stand up,
1.
To rise from sitting; to be on the feet.
2.
To arise in order to gain notice.
Against whom when the accusers stood up, they brought no accusation of such things as I supposed. Acts 25.
3.
To make a party.
When we stood up about the corn--
To stand up for, to defend; to justify; to support, or attempt to support; as, to stand up for the administration.
To stand upon,
1.
To concern; to interest. Does it not stand upon them to examine the grounds of their opinion? This phrase is, I believe, obsolete; but we say, it stands us in hand, that is, it is our concern, it is for our interest.
2.
To value; to pride.
We highly esteem and stand much upon our birth.
3.
To insist; as, to stand upon security.
To stand with, to be consistent. The faithful servants of God will receive what they pray for, so far as stands with his purposes and glory.
It stands with reason that they should be rewarded liberally.
To stand together, is used, but the last two phrases are not in very general use, and are perhaps growing obsolete.
To stand against, to oppose; to resist.
To stand fast, to be fixed; to be unshaken or immovable.
To stand in hand, to be important to ones interest; to be necessary or advantageous. It stands us in hand to be on good terms with our neighbors.

STAND

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To endure; to sustain; to bear. I cannot stand the cold or the heat.
2.
To endure; to resist without yielding or receding.
So had I stood the shock of angry fat.
He stood the furious foe.
3.
To await; to suffer; to abide by.
Bid him disband the legions--and stand the judgment of a Roman senate.
To stand ones ground, to deep the ground or station one has taken; to maintain ones position; in a literal or figurative sense; as, an army stands its ground, when it is not compelled to retreat. A man stands his ground in an argument, when he is able to maintain it, or is not refuted.
To stand it, to bear; to be able to endure; or to maintain ones ground or state; a popular phrase.
To stand trial, is to sustain the trial or examination of a cause; not to give up without trial.

STAND

,
Noun.
1.
A stop; a halt; as, to make a stand; to come to a stand, either in walking or in any progressive business.
The horse made a stand, when he charged them and routed them.
2.
A station; a place or post where one stands; or a place convenient for persons to remain for any purpose. The sellers of fruit have their several stands in the market.
I took my stand upon an eminence.
3.
Rank; post; station.
Father, since your fortune did attain so high a stand, I mean not to descend.
[In lieu of this, standing is now used. He is a man of high standing in his own country.]
4.
The act of opposing.
We have come off like Romans; neither foolish in our stands, nor cowardly in retire.
5.
The highest point; or the ultimate point of progression, where a stop is made, and regressive motion commences. The population of the world will not come to a stand, while the means of subsistence can be obtained. The prosperity of the Roman empire came to a stand in the reign of Augustus; after which it declined.
Vice is at stand, and at the highest flow.
6.
A young tree, usually reserved when the other trees are cut. [English.]
7.
A small table; as a candle-stand; or any frame on which vessels and utensils may be laid.
8.
In commerce, a weight of from two hundred and a half to three hundred of pitch.
9.
Something on which a thing rests or is laid; as a hay-stand.
Stand of arms, in military affairs, a musket with its usual appendages, as a bayonet, cartridge box, &c.
To be at a stand, to stop on account of some doubt or difficulty; hence, to be perplexed; to be embarrassed; to hesitate what to determine, or what to do.

Definition 2022


Stand

Stand

See also: stand, stånd, and štand

German

Noun

Stand m (genitive Stands or Standes, plural Stände, diminutive Ständchen n)

  1. stand
  2. estate

Declension

Derived terms


Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German stand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtɑnt/
    Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

Stand m (plural Stänn)

  1. stand, stall
  2. level, position (e.g. in a hierarchy)
  3. stage, phase (e.g. of a project)
  4. score (in a game)

stand

stand

See also: Stand, stånd, and štand

English

Verb

stand (third-person singular simple present stands, present participle standing, simple past and past participle stood)

A painting of a girl standing.
  1. (heading) To position or be positioned physically.
    1. (intransitive) To support oneself on the feet in an erect position.
      Here I stand, wondering what to do next.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
        Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps, [], and the light of the reflector fell full upon her.
    2. (intransitive) To rise to one’s feet; to stand up.
      Stand up, walk to the refrigerator, and get your own snack.
    3. (intransitive) To remain motionless.
      Do not leave your car standing in the road.
      • Bible, Matthew ii, 9
        The star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was.
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
        The slightest effort made the patient cough. He would stand leaning on a stick and holding a hand to his side, and when the paroxysm had passed it left him shaking.
      • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, chapter III:
        Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
    4. (intransitive) To be placed in an upright or vertical orientation.
    5. (transitive) To place in an upright or standing position.
      He stood the broom in a corner and took a break.
    6. (intransitive) To occupy or hold a place; to be situated or located.
      Paris stands on the Seine.
      • 1774, Edward Long, The History of Jamaica. Or, General Survey of the Antient and Modern State of that Island, volume 2, book 2, chapter 7, 6:
        The chapel ſtands on the South ſide of the ſquare, near the governor’s houſe.
    7. (intransitive) To measure when erect on the feet.
  2. (heading) To position or be positioned mentally.
    1. (intransitive, followed by to + infinitive`) To be positioned to gain or lose.
      He stands to get a good price for the house.
    2. (transitive, negative) To tolerate.
      I can’t stand when people don’t read the instructions.
      I can’t stand him.
      • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
        “[…] if you call my duds a ‘livery’ again there'll be trouble. It's bad enough to go around togged out like a life saver on a drill day, but I can stand that 'cause I'm paid for it. What I won't stand is to have them togs called a livery. [].”
    3. (intransitive) To maintain one's ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe.
      • Spectator
        readers by whose judgment I would stand or fall
    4. (intransitive) To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition.
      • Bible, Esther viii. 11
        The king granted the Jews [] to gather themselves together, and to stand for their life.
      • Robert South (1634–1716)
        the standing pattern of their imitation
    5. (intransitive, obsolete) To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist.
      • Bible, Hebrews ix. 10
        sacrifices [] which stood only in meats and drinks
      • John Dryden (1631-1700)
        Accomplish what your signs foreshow; / I stand resigned, and am prepared to go.
      • Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
        Thou seest how it stands with me, and that I may not tarry.
  3. (heading) To position or be positioned socially.
    1. (intransitive, cricket) To act as an umpire.
    2. (transitive) To undergo; withstand; hold up.
      The works of Shakespeare have stood the test of time.
      • John Dryden (1631-1700)
        Love stood the siege.
      • Joseph Addison (1672-1719)
        Bid him disband his legions, [] / And stand the judgment of a Roman senate.
      • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
        He stood the furious foe.
    3. (intransitive, Britain) To seek election.
      He is standing for election to the local council.
      • Izaak Walton (c.1594-1683)
        He stood to be elected one of the proctors of the university.
    4. (intransitive) To be valid.
      What I said yesterday still stands.
    5. (transitive) To oppose, usually as a team, in competition.
      • 1957, Matt Christopher, Basketball Sparkplug, Ch.7:
        "Kim, Jack, and I will stand you guys," Jimmie Burdette said. ¶ "We'll smear you!" laughed Ron.
      • c. 1973, R. J. Childerhose, Hockey Fever in Goganne Falls, p.95:
        The game stopped while sides were sorted out. Andy did the sorting. "Okay," he said. "Jimmy is coming out. He and Gaston and Ike and me will stand you guys."
      • 1978, Louis Sachar, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, Ch.21:
        "Hey, Louis," Dameon shouted. "Do you want to play kickball?" ¶ ""All right," said Louis. "Ron and I will both play." [] ¶ "Ron and I will stand everybody!" Louis announced.
    6. (transitive) To cover the expense of; to pay for.
      to stand a treat
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Thackeray to this entry?)
    7. (intransitive) To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation.
      Christian charity, or love, stands first in the rank of gifts.
    8. (intransitive) To be consistent; to agree; to accord.
      • Philip Massinger (1583-1640)
        Doubt me not; by heaven, I will do nothing / But what may stand with honour.
    9. (intransitive) To appear in court.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  4. (intransitive, nautical) Of a ship or its captain, to steer, sail (in a specified direction, for a specified destination etc.).
    • 1630, John Smith, True Travels, in Kupperman 1988, p.40:
      To repaire his defects, hee stood for the coast of Calabria, but hearing there was six or seven Galleyes at Mesina hee departed thence for Malta [].
  5. (intransitive) To remain without ruin or injury.
    • John Dryden (1631-1700)
      My mind on its own centre stands unmoved.
    • Lord Byron (1788-1824)
      The ruin'd wall / Stands when its wind-worn battlements are gone.
  6. (card games) To stop asking for more cards; to keep one's hand as it has been dealt so far.

Usage notes

  • In older works, standen is found as a past participle of this verb; it is now archaic.
  • (tolerate): This is almost always found in a negative form such as can’t stand, or No-one can stand… In this sense it is a catenative verb that takes the gerund -ing or infinitive to.... See Appendix:English catenative verbs.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

stand (plural stands)

  1. The act of standing.
    • Spectator
      I took my stand upon an eminence [] to look into their several ladings.
  2. A defensive position or effort. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. A resolute, unwavering position; firm opinion; action for a purpose in the face of opposition.
    They took a firm stand against copyright infringement.
  4. A period of performance in a given location or venue.
    They have a four-game stand at home against the Yankees. They spent the summer touring giving 4 one-night stands a week.
  5. A device to hold something upright or aloft.
    He set the music upon the stand and began to play. an umbrella stand; a hat-stand
    • 1915, Mrs. Belloc Lowndes, The Lodger, chapter II:
      There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  6. The platform on which a witness testifies in court; the witness stand or witness box.
    She took the stand and quietly answered questions.
  7. A particular grove or other group of trees or shrubs.
    This stand of pines is older than the one next to it.
  8. (forestry) A contiguous group of trees sufficiently uniform in age-class distribution, composition, and structure, and growing on a site of sufficiently uniform quality, to be a distinguishable unit.
  9. A standstill, a motionless state, as of someone confused, or a hunting dog who has found game.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, “Of Truth”, Essays
      One of the later school of the Grecians, examineth the matter, and is at a stand, to think what should be in it, that men should love lies; where neither they make for pleasure, as with poets, nor for advantage, as with the merchant; but for the lie’s sake.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, I.168:
      Antonia's patience now was at a stand— / "Come, come, 't is no time now for fooling there," / She whispered []
  10. A small building, booth, or stage, as in a bandstand or hamburger stand.
  11. A designated spot where someone or something may stand or wait.
    a taxi stand
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      I have found you out a stand most fit, / Where you may have such vantage on the duke, / He shall not pass you.
  12. (US, dated) The situation of a shop, store, hotel, etc.
    a good, bad, or convenient stand for business
  13. (sports) grandstand (often in plural)
    • 2011 November 11, Rory Houston, Estonia 0-4 Republic of Ireland”, in RTE Sport:
      The end of the opening period was relatively quite [sic] as Vassiljev's desperate shot from well outside the penalty area flew into the stand housing the Irish supporters and then Ward's ctoss [sic] was gathered by goalkeeper Pareiko.
  14. (cricket) A partnership.
  15. (military, plural often stand) A single set, as of arms.
    • 1927, Herbert Asbury, The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld, Paragon House (1990), ISBN 1-55778-348-9, p.170:
      The police and troops captured eleven thousand stand of arms, including muskets and pistols, together with several thousand bludgeons and other weapons.
  16. (obsolete) Rank; post; station; standing.
    • Samuel Daniel (1562-1619)
      Father, since your fortune did attain / So high a stand, I mean not to descend.
  17. (dated) A state of perplexity or embarrassment.
    to be at a stand what to do
  18. A young tree, usually reserved when other trees are cut; also, a tree growing or standing upon its own root, in distinction from one produced from a scion set in a stock, either of the same or another kind of tree.
  19. (obsolete) A weight of from two hundred and fifty to three hundred pounds, used in weighing pitch.

Derived terms

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: everything · six · comes · #500: stand · past · suppose · else

Anagrams


Danish

Etymology

From the verb stande

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stand/, [sd̥anˀ]

Noun

stand c (singular definite standen, plural indefinite stande)

  1. stand (device to hold something upright or aloft)
  2. stand (small building or booth)

Inflection

Noun

stand c (singular definite standen, plural indefinite stænder)

  1. position, social status, station
  2. class, rank
  3. occupation, trade, profession
  4. estate

Inflection

Noun

stand c

  1. (uncountable) condition, repair

Related terms

  • godt i stand
  • gøre i stand
  • være i stand til
  • i stand til alt

References


Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch *stand, from Proto-Germanic *standaz. Related to staan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

stand m (plural standen, diminutive standje n)

  1. posture, position, bearing
  2. rank, standing, station; class
  3. score (of a game, match)
Synonyms
Derived terms
  • (score): speelstand

Etymology 2

From English stand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛnt/

Noun

stand m (plural stands, diminutive standje n)

  1. stand (small building or booth)
Synonyms

Anagrams


French

Pronunciation

Noun

stand m (plural stands)

  1. stand

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Verb

stand

  1. First-person singular preterite of stehen.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of stehen.

Gothic

Romanization

stand

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌽𐌳

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Stand.[1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃtɒnd]
  • Hyphenation: stand

Noun

stand (plural standok)

  1. stand, booth, stall, kiosk (a small enclosed structure, often freestanding, open on one side or with a window, used as a booth to sell newspapers, cigarettes, etc., on the street or in a market)

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative stand standok
accusative standot standokat
dative standnak standoknak
instrumental standdal standokkal
causal-final standért standokért
translative standdá standokká
terminative standig standokig
essive-formal standként standokként
essive-modal
inessive standban standokban
superessive standon standokon
adessive standnál standoknál
illative standba standokba
sublative standra standokra
allative standhoz standokhoz
elative standból standokból
delative standról standokról
ablative standtól standoktól
Possessive forms of stand
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. standom standjaim
2nd person sing. standod standjaid
3rd person sing. standja standjai
1st person plural standunk standjaink
2nd person plural standotok standjaitok
3rd person plural standjuk standjaik

Synonyms

References

  1. Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Italian

Etymology

From English.

Noun

stand m (invariable)

  1. stand (section of an exhibition; gallery at a sports event)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From the old verb stande (replaced by stå)

Noun

stand m (definite singular standen, indefinite plural stander, definite plural standene)

  1. condition, order, state
  2. height, level, reading
  3. a stand (e.g. at an exhibition)

Derived terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the old verb stande (replaced by stå)

Noun

stand m (definite singular standen, indefinite plural standar, definite plural standane)

  1. condition, order, state
  2. height, level, reading
  3. a stand (e.g. at an exhibition)

Derived terms

References


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *standaz.

Pronunciation

Noun

stand m

  1. (rare) delay

Declension


Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *standaz, whence also Old English stand.

Noun

stand m

  1. stand (clarification of this Old High German definition is being sought)

Portuguese

Noun

stand m (plural stands)

  1. Alternative form of estande

Spanish

Noun

stand m (plural stands)

  1. stand (enclosed structure in the street)