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Webster 1913 Edition


Stall

Stall

(sta̤l)
,
Noun.
[OE.
stal
, AS.
steall
,
stall
, a place, seat, or station, a stable; akin to D. & OHG.
stal
, G. & Sw.
stall
, Icel.
stallr
, Dan.
stald
, originally, a standing place; akin also to G.
stelle
a place,
stellen
to place, Gr.
στέλλειν
to set, place, send, and E.
stand
. √163. See
Stand
, and cf.
Apostle
,
Epistle
,
Forestall
,
Install
,
Stale
,
Adj.
&
Verb.
I.
, 1st
Stalk
,
Stallion
,
Still
.]
1.
A stand; a station; a fixed spot; hence, the stand or place where a horse or an ox is kept and fed; the division of a stable, or the compartment, for one horse, ox, or other animal.
“In an oxes stall.”
Chaucer.
2.
A stable; a place for cattle.
At last he found a
stall
where oxen stood.
Dryden.
3.
A small apartment or shed in which merchandise is exposed for sale;
as, a butcher’s
stall
; a book
stall
.
4.
A bench or table on which small articles of merchandise are exposed for sale.
How peddlers'
stalls
with glittering toys are laid.
Gay.
5.
A seat in the choir of a church, for one of the officiating clergy. It is inclosed, either wholly or partially, at the back and sides. The stalls are frequently very rich, with canopies and elaborate carving.
The dignified clergy, out of humility, have called their thrones by the names of
stalls
.
Bp. Warburton.
Loud the monks sang in their
stalls
.
Longfellow.
6.
In the theater, a seat with arms or otherwise partly inclosed, as distinguished from the benches, sofas, etc.
7.
(Mining)
The space left by excavation between pillars. See
Post and stall
, under
Post
.
Stall reader
,
one who reads books at a stall where they are exposed for sale.
Cries the
stall reader
, “Bless us! what a word on
A titlepage is this!”
Milton.

Stall

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Stalled
(sta̤ld)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Stalling
.]
[Cf. Sw.
stalla
, Dan.
stalde
.]
1.
To put into a stall or stable; to keep in a stall or stalls;
as, to
stall
an ox
.
Where King Latinus then his oxen
stalled
.
Dryden.
2.
To fatten;
as, to
stall
cattle
.
[Prov. Eng.]
3.
To place in an office with the customary formalities; to install.
[Obs.]
Shak.
4.
To plunge into mire or snow so as not to be able to get on; to set; to fix;
as, to
stall
a cart
.
Burton.
His horses had been
stalled
in the snow.
E. E. Hale.
5.
To forestall; to anticipate.
[Obs.]
This is not to be
stall'd
by my report.
Massinger.
6.
To keep close; to keep secret.
[Obs.]
Stall
this in your bosom.
Shakespeare

Stall

,
Verb.
I.
[AS.
steallian
to have room. See
Stall
,
Noun.
]
1.
To live in, or as in, a stall; to dwell.
[Obs.]
We could not
stall
together
In the whole world.
Shakespeare
2.
To kennel, as dogs.
Johnson.
3.
To be set, as in mire or snow; to stick fast.
4.
To be tired of eating, as cattle.
[Prov. Eng.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Stall

STALL

,
Noun.
[G., to set, that is, to throw down, to thrust down. See Still.]
1.
Primarily, a stand; a station; a fixed spot; hence, the stand or place where a horse or an ox is kept and fed; the division of a stable, or the apartment for one horse or ox. The stable contains eight or ten stalls.
2.
A stable; a place for cattle.
At last he found a stall where oxen stood.
3.
In 1 Kings 4:26 stall is used for horse. Solomon had forty thousand stalls of horses for his chariots. In 2 Chronicles 9:25, stall means stable. Solomon had four thousand stalls for horses and chariots. These passages are reconciled by the definition given above; Solomon had four thousand stables, each containing ten stalls; forty thousand stalls.
4.
A bench, form or frame of shelves in the open air, where any thing is exposed to sale. It is curious to observe the stalls of books in the boulevards and other public places in Paris.
5.
A small house or shed in which an occupation is carried on; as a butchers stall.
6.
The seat of a dignified clergyman in the choir.
The dignified clergy, out of humility, have called their thrones by the name of stalls. [probably a mistake of the reason.]

STALL

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To put into a stable; or to keep in a stable; as, to stall an ox.
Where king Latinus then his oxen stalld.
2.
To install; to place in an office with the customary formalities. [For this, install is now used.]
3.
To set; to fix; to plunge into mire so as not to be able to proceed; as, to stall horses or a carriage. [This phrase I have heard in Virginia. In New England, set is used in a like sense.]

STALL

, v.i.
1.
To dwell; to inhabit.
We could not stall together in the world. [Not in use.]
2.
To kennel.
3.
To be set, as in mire.
4.
To be tired of eating, as cattle.

Definition 2022


Stall

Stall

See also: stall and ställ

German

Noun

Stall m (genitive Stalls or Stalles, plural Ställe)

  1. stable

Declension

Derived terms


Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German stal, from Proto-Germanic *stallaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɑl

Noun

Stall m (plural Ställ)

  1. stable

stall

stall

See also: Stall and ställ

English

Noun

stall (plural stalls)

  1. (countable) A compartment for a single animal in a stable or cattle shed.
  2. A stable; a place for cattle.
    • Dryden
      At last he found a stall where oxen stood.
  3. A bench or table on which small articles of merchandise are exposed for sale.
    • John Gay
      how peddlers' stalls with glittering toys are laid
  4. (countable) A small open-fronted shop, for example in a market.
  5. A very small room used for a shower or a toilet.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Updike, Rabbit at Rest,
      Rabbit eases from the king-size bed, goes into their bathroom with its rose-colored one-piece Fiberglas tub and shower stall, and urinates into the toilet of a matching rose porcelain.
  6. (countable) A seat in a theatre close to and (about) level with the stage; traditionally, a seat with arms, or otherwise partly enclosed, as distinguished from the benches, sofas, etc.
  7. (aeronautics) Loss of lift due to an airfoil's critical angle of attack being exceeded.
  8. (paganism and Heathenry) An Heathen altar, typically an indoor one, as contrasted with a more substantial outdoor harrow.
    • 1989, Edred Thorsson, A Book of Troth, Llewellyn Publications, ISBN 9780875427775, page 156:
      In a private rite, a ring is drawn on the ground around a harrow or before an indoor stall.
    • 2006, Selene Silverwind, “Asatruar Tools and Practices”, in Everything you need to know about Paganism, David & Charles, ISBN 9780715324868, page 117:
      Some Asatruar kindreds call their indoor altars stalls and their outdoor altars harrows.
    • 2006, Mark Puryear, The Nature of Asatru: An Overview of the Ideals and Philosophy of the Indigenous Religion of Northern Europe, iUniverse, ISBN 9780595389643, page 237:
      Stalli (STAL-i) - Altar.
  9. A seat in a church, especially one next to the chancel or choir, reserved for church officials and dignitaries.
  10. A church office that entitles the incumbent to the use of a church stall.
    • 1910 [1840], Alexandre Dumas, père, translator not mentioned, Celebrated Crimes: Urbain Grandier, P. F. Collier edition,
      When he had been some months installed there as a priest-in-charge, he received a prebendal stall, thanks to the same patrons, in the collegiate church of Sainte-Croix.
  11. A sheath to protect the finger.
  12. (mining) The space left by excavation between pillars.
  13. (Canada) A parking stall; a space for a vehicle in a parking lot or parkade.
Synonyms
  • (compartment for livestock): boose
Translations
Related terms
  • stall-fed
  • orchestra stalls

Verb

stall (third-person singular simple present stalls, present participle stalling, simple past and past participle stalled)

  1. (transitive) To put (an animal etc) in a stall.
    to stall an ox
    • Dryden
      where King Latinus then his oxen stalled
  2. To fatten.
    to stall cattle
  3. (intransitive) To come to a standstill.
  4. To plunge into mire or snow so as not to be able to get on; to set; to fix.
    to stall a cart
    • E. E. Hale
      His horses had been stalled in the snow.
  5. (intransitive, aeronautics) To exceed the critical angle of attack, resulting in total loss of lift.
  6. (obsolete) To live in, or as if in, a stall; to dwell.
    • Shakespeare
      We could not stall together / In the whole world.
  7. (obsolete) To be stuck, as in mire or snow; to stick fast.
  8. (obsolete) To be tired of eating, as cattle.
  9. To place in an office with the customary formalities; to install.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  10. To forestall; to anticipate.
    • Massinger
      not to be stall'd by my report
  11. To keep close; to keep secret.
    • Shakespeare
      Stall this in your bosom.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

stall (plural stalls)

  1. An action that is intended to cause or actually causes delay.
    His encounters with security, reception, the secretary, and the assistant were all stalls until the general manager's attorney arrived.
Translations

Verb

stall (third-person singular simple present stalls, present participle stalling, simple past and past participle stalled)

  1. (transitive) To employ delaying tactics against.
    He stalled the creditors as long as he could.
  2. (intransitive) To employ delaying tactics.
    Soon it became clear that she was stalling to give him time to get away.

Synonyms

Translations

References

  • stall” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse stallr

Noun

stall m (definite singular stallen, indefinite plural staller, definite plural stallene)

  1. a stable (building where horses are housed)

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse stallr

Noun

stall m (definite singular stallen, indefinite plural stallar, definite plural stallane)

  1. a stable (building where horses are housed)

References


Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology

From Old Swedish stalder, from Old Norse stallr.

Noun

stall n

  1. stable, building for housing horses
  2. a team in certain sports, in particular racing.

Declension

Inflection of stall 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative stall stallet stall stallen
Genitive stalls stallets stalls stallens

Descendants