Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Set

Set

(sĕt)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Set
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Setting
.]
[OE.
setten
, AS.
setton
; akin to OS.
settian
, OFries.
setta
, D.
zetten
, OHG.
sezzen
, G.
setzen
, Icel.
setja
, Sw.
sätta
, Dan.
s[GREEK]tte
, Goth.
satjan
; causative from the root of E.
sit
. √154. See
Sit
, and cf.
Seize
.]
1.
To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix;
as, to
set
a house on a stone foundation; to
set
a book on a shelf; to
set
a dish on a table; to
set
a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end
.
I do
set
my bow in the cloud.
Gen. ix. 13.
2.
Hence, to attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.
Set
your affection on things above.
Col. iii. 2.
The Lord
set
a mark upon Cain.
Gen. iv. 15.
3.
To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state (described by the accompanying words); to cause to be.
The Lord thy God will
set
thee on high.
Deut. xxviii. 1.
I am come to
set
a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother.
Matt. x. 35.
Every incident
sets
him thinking.
Coleridge.
4.
To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to.
Specifically:
(a)
To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass;
as, to
set
a coach in the mud
.
They show how hard they are
set
in this particular.
Addison.
(b)
To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid;
as, to
set
one’s countenance
.
His eyes were
set
by reason of his age.
1 Kings xiv. 4.
On these three objects his heart was
set
.
Macaulay.
Make my heart as a millstone,
set
my face as a flint.
Tennyson.
(c)
To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant;
as, to
set
pear trees in an orchard
.
(d)
To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting;
as, to
set
glass in a sash
.
And him too rich a jewel to be
set

In vulgar metal for a vulgar use.
Dryden.
(e)
To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle;
as, to
set
milk for cheese
.
5.
To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt.
Specifically: –
(a)
To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare;
as, to
set
(that is, to hone) a razor; to
set
a saw
.
Tables for to
sette
, and beddes make.
Chaucer.
(b)
To extend and bring into position; to spread;
as, to
set
the sails of a ship
.
(c)
To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote;
as, to
set
a psalm
.
Fielding.
(d)
To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace;
as, to
set
a broken bone
.
(e)
To make to agree with some standard;
as, to
set
a watch or a clock
.
(f)
(Masonry)
To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.
6.
To stake at play; to wager; to risk.
I have
set
my life upon a cast,
And I will stand the hazard of the die.
Shakespeare
7.
To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing.
Set
thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute.
Dryden.
8.
To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix;
as, to
set
a time for a meeting; to
set
a price on a horse
.
9.
To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.
High on their heads, with jewels richly
set
,
Each lady wore a radiant coronet.
Dryden.
Pastoral dales thin
set
with modern farms.
Wordsworth.
10.
To value; to rate; – with at.
Be you contented, wearing now the garland,
To have a son
set
your decrees at naught.
Shakespeare
I do not
set
my life at a pin's fee.
Shakespeare
11.
To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; – said of hunting dogs.
12.
To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign;
as, to
set
an example; to
set
lessons to be learned
.
13.
To suit; to become;
as, it
sets
him ill
.
[Scot.]
14.
(Print.)
To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.;
as, to
set
type; to
set
a page.
To set abroach
.
See
Abroach
.
[Obs.]
Shak.
To set against
,
to oppose; to set in comparison with, or to oppose to, as an equivalent in exchange;
as,
to set
one thing
against
another
.
To set agoing
,
to cause to move.
To set apart
,
to separate to a particular use; to separate from the rest; to reserve.
To set a saw
,
to bend each tooth a little, every alternate one being bent to one side, and the intermediate ones to the other side, so that the opening made by the saw may be a little wider than the thickness of the back, to prevent the saw from sticking.
To set aside
.
(a)
To leave out of account; to pass by; to omit; to neglect; to reject; to annul.

Setting aside
all other considerations, I will endeavor to know the truth, and yield to that.
Tillotson.
(b)
To set apart; to reserve;
as,
to set aside
part of one's income
.
(c)
(Law)
See under
Aside
.
To set at defiance
,
to defy.
To set at ease
,
to quiet; to tranquilize;
as,
to set
the heart
at ease
.
To set at naught
,
to undervalue; to contemn; to despise.
“Ye have set at naught all my counsel.”
Prov. i. 25.
To set a trap
To set a snare
, or
To set a gin
,
to put it in a proper condition or position to catch prey; hence, to lay a plan to deceive and draw another into one's power.
To set at work
, or
To set to work
.
(a)
To cause to enter on work or action, or to direct how tu enter on work.
(b)
To apply one's self; – used reflexively.
To set before
.
(a)
To bring out to view before; to exhibit.
(b)
To propose for choice to; to offer to.
To set by
.
(a)
To set apart or on one side; to reject.
(b)
To attach the value of (anything) to.
“I set not a straw by thy dreamings.”
Chaucer.
To set by the compass
,
to observe and note the bearing or situation of by the compass.
To set case
,
to suppose; to assume. Cf.
Put case
, under
Put
,
Verb.
T.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
To set down
.
(a)
To enter in writing; to register.
Some rules were to be
set down
for the government of the army.
Clarendon.
(b)
To fix; to establish; to ordain.
This law we may name eternal, being that order which God . . . hath
set down
with himself, for himself to do all things by.
Hooker.
(c)
To humiliate.
To set eyes on
,
to see; to behold; to fasten the eyes on.
To set fire to
, or
To set on fire
,
to communicate fire to; fig., to inflame; to enkindle the passions of; to irritate.
To set flying
(Naut.)
,
to hook to halyards, sheets, etc., instead of extending with rings or the like on a stay; – said of a sail.
To set forth
.
(a)
To manifest; to offer or present to view; to exhibt; to display.
(b)
To publish; to promulgate; to make appear
.
Waller.
(c)
To send out; to prepare and send.
[Obs.]
The Venetian admiral had a fleet of sixty galleys,
set forth
by the Venetians.
Knolles.
To set forward
.
(a)
To cause to advance.
(b)
To promote.
To set free
,
to release from confinement, imprisonment, or bondage; to liberate; to emancipate.
To set in
,
to put in the way; to begin; to give a start to.
[Obs.]
If you please to assist and
set
me
in
, I will recollect myself.
Collier.
To set in order
,
to adjust or arrange; to reduce to method.
“The rest will I set in order when I come.”
1 Cor. xi. 34.
To set milk
.
(a)
To expose it in open dishes in order that the cream may rise to the surface.
(b)
To cause it to become curdled as by the action of rennet. See 4
(e)
.
To set much by
or
To set little by
,
to care much, or little, for.
To set of
,
to value; to set by.
[Obs.]
“I set not an haw of his proverbs.”
Chaucer.
To set off
.
(a)
To separate from a whole; to assign to a particular purpose; to portion off;
as,
to set off
a portion of an estate
.
(b)
To adorn; to decorate; to embellish
.
They . . .
set off
the worst faces with the best airs.
Addison.
(c)
To give a flattering description of.
To set off against
,
to place against as an equivalent;
as,
to set off
one man's services
against
another's
.
To set on
or
To set upon
.
(a)
To incite; to instigate.
“Thou, traitor, hast set on thy wife to this.”
Shak.
(b)
To employ, as in a task.
Set on thy wife to observe.”
Shak.
(c)
To fix upon; to attach strongly to; as, to set one's heart or affections on some object. See definition 2, above.
To set one's cap for
.
See under
Cap
,
Noun.
To set one's self against
,
to place one's self in a state of enmity or opposition to.
To set one's teeth
,
to press them together tightly.
To set on foot
,
to set going; to put in motion; to start.
To set out
.
(a)
To assign; to allot; to mark off; to limit;
as,
to set out
the share of each proprietor or heir of an estate;
to set out
the widow's thirds
.
(b)
To publish, as a proclamation
.
[Obs.]
(c)
To adorn; to embellish.
An ugly woman, in rich habit
set out
with jewels, nothing can become.
Dryden.
(d)
To raise, equip, and send forth; to furnish.
[R.]
The Venetians pretend they could
set out
, in case of great necessity, thirty men-of-war.
Addison.
(e)
To show; to display; to recommend; to set off.
I could
set out
that best side of Luther.
Atterbury.
(f)
To show; to prove.
[R.]
“Those very reasons set out how heinous his sin was.”
Atterbury.
(g)
(Law)
To recite; to state at large.
To set over
.
(a)
To appoint or constitute as supervisor, inspector, ruler, or commander.
(b)
To assign; to transfer; to convey.
To set right
,
to correct; to put in order.
To set sail
.
(Naut.)
See under
Sail
,
Noun.
To set store by
,
to consider valuable.
To set the fashion
,
to determine what shall be the fashion; to establish the mode.
To set the teeth on edge
,
to affect the teeth with a disagreeable sensation, as when acids are brought in contact with them.
To set the watch
(Naut.)
,
to place the starboard or port watch on duty.
To set to
,
to attach to; to affix to.
“He . . . hath set to his seal that God is true.”
John iii. 33.
To set up
.
(a)
To erect; to raise; to elevate; as, to set up a building, or a machine; to set up a post, a wall, a pillar.
(b)
Hence, to exalt; to put in power
. “I will . . . set up the throne of David over Israel.”
2 Sam. iii. 10.
(c)
To begin, as a new institution; to institute; to establish; to found;
as,
to set up
a manufactory; to
set up
a school
.
(d)
To enable to commence a new business;
as,
to set up
a son in trade
.
(e)
To place in view;
as,
to set up
a mark
.
(f)
To raise; to utter loudly;
as,
to set up
the voice
.
I'll
set up
such a note as she shall hear.
Dryden.
(g)
To advance; to propose as truth or for reception;
as,
to set up
a new opinion or doctrine
.
T. Burnet.
(h)
To raise from depression, or to a sufficient fortune;
as, this good fortune quite
set
him
up
.
(i)
To intoxicate
.
[Slang]
(j)
(Print.)
To put in type;
as,
to set up
copy
; to arrange in words, lines, etc., ready for printing;
as,
to set up
type
.
To set up the rigging
(Naut.)
,
to make it taut by means of tackles.
R. H. Dana, Jr.
Syn. – See
Put
.

Set

(sĕt)
,
Verb.
I.
1.
To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end.
Ere the weary sun
set
in the west.
Shakespeare
Thus this century
sets
with little mirth, and the next is likely to arise with more mourning.
Fuller.
2.
To fit music to words.
[Obs.]
Shak.
3.
To place plants or shoots in the ground; to plant.
“To sow dry, and set wet.”
Old Proverb.
4.
To be fixed for growth; to strike root; to begin to germinate or form;
as, cuttings
set
well; the fruit has
set
well (i. e., not blasted in the blossom)
.
5.
To become fixed or rigid; to be fastened.
A gathering and serring of the spirits together to resist, maketh the teeth to
set
hard one against another.
Bacon.
That fluid substance in a few minutes begins to
set
.
Boyle.
7.
To have a certain direction in motion; to flow; to move on; to tend;
as, the current
sets
to the north; the tide
sets
to the windward
.
8.
To begin to move; to go out or forth; to start; – now followed by out.
The king is
set
from London.
Shakespeare
9.
To indicate the position of game; – said of a dog;
as, the dog
sets
well
; also, to hunt game by the aid of a setter.
10.
To apply one's self; to undertake earnestly; – now followed by out.
If he
sets
industriously and sincerely to perform the commands of Christ, he can have no ground of doubting but it shall prove successful to him.
Hammond.
11.
To fit or suit one; to sit;
as, the coat
sets
well
.
[Colloquially used, but improperly, for
sit
.]
☞ The use of the verb set for sit in such expressions as, the hen is setting on thirteen eggs; a setting hen, etc., although colloquially common, and sometimes tolerated in serious writing, is not to be approved.
To set about
,
to commence; to begin.
To set forward
,
to move or march; to begin to march; to advance.
To set forth
,
to begin a journey.
To set in
.
(a)
To begin; to enter upon a particular state;
as, winter
set in
early
.
(b)
To settle one's self; to become established
. “When the weather was set in to be very bad.”
Addison.
(c)
To flow toward the shore; – said of the tide.
To set off
.
(a)
To enter upon a journey; to start.
(b)
(Typog.)
To deface or soil the next sheet; – said of the ink on a freshly printed sheet, when another sheet comes in contact with it before it has had time to dry.
To set on
or
To set upon
.
(a)
To begin, as a journey or enterprise; to set about.

He that would seriously
set upon
the search of truth.
Locke.
(b)
To assault; to make an attack.
Bacon.
Cassio hath here been
set on
in the dark.
Shakespeare
To set out
,
to begin a journey or course;
as,
to set out
for London, or from London;
to set out
in business;
to set out
in life or the world
.
To set to
,
to apply one's self to.
To set up
.
(a)
To begin business or a scheme of life;
as,
to set up
in trade;
to set up
for one's self
.
(b)
To profess openly; to make pretensions
.
Those men who
set up
for mortality without regard to religion, are generally but virtuous in part.
Swift.

Set

(sĕt)
,
Adj.
1.
Fixed in position; immovable; rigid;
as, a
set
line; a
set
countenance
.
2.
Firm; unchanging; obstinate;
as,
set
opinions or prejudices
.
3.
Regular; uniform; formal;
as, a
set
discourse; a
set
battle
.
“The set phrase of peace.”
Shak.
4.
Established; prescribed;
as,
set
forms of prayer
.
5.
Adjusted; arranged; formed; adapted.
Set hammer
.
(a)
A hammer the head of which is not tightly fastened upon the handle, but may be reversed
.
Knight.
(b)
A hammer with a concave face which forms a die for shaping anything, as the end of a bolt, rivet, etc.
Set line
,
a line to which a number of baited hooks are attached, and which, supported by floats and properly secured, may be left unguarded during the absence of the fisherman.
Set nut
,
a jam nut or lock nut. See under
Nut
.
Set screw
(Mach.)
,
a screw, sometimes cupped or printed at one end, and screwed through one part, as of a machine, tightly upon another part, to prevent the one from slipping upon the other.
Set speech
,
a speech carefully prepared before it is delivered in public; a formal or methodical speech.

Set

,
Noun.
1.
The act of setting, as of the sun or other heavenly body; descent; hence, the close; termination.
“Locking at the set of day.”
Tennyson.
The weary sun hath made a golden
set
.
Shakespeare
2.
That which is set, placed, or fixed.
Specifically: –
(a)
A young plant for growth;
as, a
set
of white thorn
.
(b)
That which is staked; a wager; a venture; a stake; hence, a game at venture.
[Obs. or R.]
We will in France, by God's grace, play a
set

Shall strike his father's crown into the hazard.
Shakespeare
That was but civil war, an equal
set
.
Dryden.
(c)
(Mech.)
Permanent change of figure in consequence of excessive strain, as from compression, tension, bending, twisting, etc.;
as, the
set
of a spring
.
(d)
A kind of punch used for bending, indenting, or giving shape to, metal;
as, a saw
set
.
(e)
(Pile Driving)
A piece placed temporarily upon the head of a pile when the latter cannot be reached by the weight, or hammer, except by means of such an intervening piece.
[Often incorrectly written
sett
.]
3.
[Perhaps due to confusion with
sect
,
sept
.]
A number of things of the same kind, ordinarily used or classed together; a collection of articles which naturally complement each other, and usually go together; an assortment; a suit;
as, a
set
of chairs, of china, of surgical or mathematical instruments, of books, etc.
[In this sense, sometimes incorrectly written
sett
.]
4.
A number of persons associated by custom, office, common opinion, quality, or the like; a division; a group; a clique.
“Others of our set.”
Tennyson.
This falls into different divisions, or
sets
, of nations connected under particular religions.
R. P. Ward.
5.
Direction or course;
as, the
set
of the wind, or of a current
.
6.
In dancing, the number of persons necessary to execute a quadrille; also, the series of figures or movements executed.
7.
The deflection of a tooth, or of the teeth, of a saw, which causes the the saw to cut a kerf, or make an opening, wider than the blade.
8.
(a)
A young oyster when first attached.
(b)
Collectively, the crop of young oysters in any locality.
9.
(Tennis)
A series of as many games as may be necessary to enable one side to win six. If at the end of the tenth game the score is a tie, the set is usually called a deuce set, and decided by an application of the rules for playing off deuce in a game. See
Deuce
.
10.
(Type Founding)
That dimension of the body of a type called by printers the
width
.
Dead set
.
(a)
The act of a setter dog when it discovers the game, and remains intently fixed in pointing it out
.
(b)
A fixed or stationary condition arising from obstacle or hindrance; a deadlock; as, to be at a dead set.
(c)
A concerted scheme to defraud by gaming; a determined onset.
To make a dead set
,
to make a determined onset, literally or figuratively.
Syn. – Collection; series; group. See
Pair
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Set

SET

,
Verb.
T.
pret. pp. set. [L. sedo; to compose, as a book, to dispose or put in order, to establish, found or institute, to possess, to cease; L. sedo, sedeo and sido, coinciding with sit, but all of one family. From the Norman orthography of this word, we have assess, assise. See Assess. Heb. Ch. to set, to place.]
1. To put or place; to fix or cause to rest in a standing posture. We set a house on a wass of stone; we set a book on a shelf. In this use, set differs from lay; we set a thing on its end or basis; we lay it on its side.
2. To put or place in its proper or natural posture. We set a chest or trunk on its bottom, not its end; we set a bedstead or a table on its feet or laeg.
3. To put, place or fix in any situation. God set the sun, moon and stars in the firmament.
I do set my bow in the cloud. Gen 9.
4. To put into any condition or state.
The Lord the God will set thee on high. Duet. 28.
I am come to set a man at variance against his father. Matt. 10.
So we say, to set in order, to set at ease, to set to work, or at work.
5. To put; to fix; to attach to.
The Lord set a mark upon Cain. Gen. 4.
So we say, to set a label on a vial or a bale.
6. To fix; to render motionless; as, the eyes are set, the jaws are set.
7. To put or fix, as a price. We set a price on a house, farm or horse.
8. To fix; to state by some rule.
The gentleman spoke with a set gesture and countenance. Carew.
The town of Berne has handsome fountains planted and set distances from one end of the street to the other. Addison.
9. To regulate or adjust; as, to set a timepiece by the sun.
He sets judgement by his passion. Prior.
10. To fit to music; to adapt with notes; as, to set the words of a psalm to music.

Definition 2022


Set

Set

See also: set, sét, sèt, sêt, sēt, sệt, and seṭ

English

Egyptian-style picture of Set
Set as shown in Egyptian art

Alternative forms

Proper noun

Set

  1. (Egyptian mythology) An ancient Egyptian god, variously described as the god of chaos, the god of thunder and storms, or the god of destruction.

Translations

Anagrams


Danish

Proper noun

Set

  1. Set

Ewe

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛt/

Proper noun

Set

  1. (biblical) Seth

Faroese

Proper noun

Set m

  1. A male given name.

Usage notes

Patronymics

  • son of Set: Setsson
  • daughter of Set: Setsdóttir

Declension

Singular
Indefinite
Nominative Set
Accusative Set
Dative Seti
Genitive Sets

German

Noun

Set (n)

  1. place mat

Proper noun

Set m

  1. Set
  2. (biblical)(Protestant Bible) Seth.

Icelandic

Proper noun

Set

  1. (biblical) Seth
    • Genesis 5:3 (Icelandic, English)
      Adam lifði hundrað og þrjátíu ár. Þá gat hann son í líking sinni, eftir sinni mynd, og nefndi hann Set.
      When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth.

Portuguese

Alternative forms

Etymology

Borrowing from Ancient Greek Σήθ (Sḗth), from Egyptian [Term?].

Proper noun

Set m

  1. (Egyptian mythology) Set (god of Chaos)

Swedish

Proper noun

Set

  1. (biblical) Seth.
  2. A male given name of biblical origin; also spelled Seth.

set

set

See also: Set, sét, sèt, sêt, sēt, sệt, and seṭ

English

Verb

set (third-person singular simple present sets, present participle setting, simple past set, past participle set or (dialectal) setten)

  1. (transitive) To put (something) down, to rest.
    Set the tray there.
  2. (transitive) To attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.
    I have set my heart on running the marathon.
    • Bible, Genesis iv. 15
      The Lord set a mark upon Cain.
  3. (transitive) To put in a specified condition or state; to cause to be.
    • Bible, Deuteronomy xxviii. 1
      The Lord thy God will set thee on high.
    • Bible, Matthew x. 35
      I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother.
    • Coleridge
      Every incident sets him thinking.
  4. (transitive, dated) To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot.
    to set a coach in the mud
  5. (transitive) To determine or settle.
    to set the rent
  6. (transitive) To adjust.
    I set the alarm at 6 a.m.
  7. (transitive) To punch (a nail) into wood so that its head is below the surface.
  8. (transitive) To arrange with dishes and cutlery, to set the table.
    Please set the table for our guests.
  9. (transitive) To introduce or describe.
    I’ll tell you what happened, but first let me set the scene.
  10. (transitive) To locate (a play, etc.); to assign a backdrop to.
    He says he will set his next film in France.
  11. (transitive) To compile, to make (a puzzle or challenge).
    This crossword was set by Araucaria.
  12. (transitive) To prepare (a stage or film set).
  13. (transitive) To fit (someone) up in a situation.
  14. (transitive) To arrange (type).
    It was a complex page, but he set it quickly.
  15. (transitive) To devise and assign (work) to.
    • 2013 July 19, Peter Wilby, Finland spreads word on schools”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 30:
      Imagine a country where children do nothing but play until they start compulsory schooling at age seven. Then, without exception, they attend comprehensives until the age of 16. Charging school fees is illegal, and so is sorting pupils into ability groups by streaming or setting.
    The teacher set her students the task of drawing a foot.
  16. (transitive, volleyball) To direct (the ball) to a teammate for an attack.
  17. (intransitive) To solidify.
    The glue sets in four minutes.
  18. (transitive) To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle.
    to set milk for cheese
  19. (intransitive) Of a heavenly body, to disappear below the horizon of a planet, etc, as the latter rotates.
    The moon sets at eight o'clock tonight.
  20. (transitive, bridge) To defeat a contract.
  21. (obsolete, now followed by "out", as in set out) To begin to move; to go forth.
  22. (intransitive, of fruit) To be fixed for growth; to strike root; to begin to germinate or form.
    • 1906, Canada. Dept. of Agriculture. Fruit Branch, Fruit crop report
      In the Annapolis Valley, in spite of an irregular bloom, the fruit has set well and has, as yet, been little affected by scab.
  23. (intransitive, Southern US, Midwestern US, dialects) To sit (be in a seated position).
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Old Applegate, in the stern, just set and looked at me, and Lord James, amidship, waved both arms and kept hollering for help. I took a couple of everlasting big strokes and managed to grab hold of the skiff's rail, close to the stern.
    He sets in that chair all day.
  24. To hunt game with the aid of a setter.
  25. (hunting, transitive, intransitive) Of a dog, to indicate the position of game.
    The dog sets the bird.
    Your dog sets well.
  26. (obsolete) To apply oneself; to undertake earnestly; to set out.
    • Hammond
      If he sets industriously and sincerely to perform the commands of Christ, he can have no ground of doubting but it shall prove successful to him.
  27. (transitive, intransitive) To fit music to words.
    • Dryden
      Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  28. (transitive, intransitive) To place plants or shoots in the ground; to plant.
    to set pear trees in an orchard
    • Old proverb
      Sow dry, and set wet.
  29. To become fixed or rigid; to be fastened.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  30. To have a certain direction of motion; to flow; to move on; to tend.
    The current sets to the north; the tide sets to the windward.
  31. To place or fix in a setting.
    to set a precious stone in a border of metal
    to set glass in a sash
    • Dryden
      And him too rich a jewel to be set / In vulgar metal for a vulgar use.
  32. To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare.
    to set (that is, to hone) a razor
    to set a saw
  33. To extend and bring into position; to spread.
    to set the sails of a ship
  34. To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote.
    to set a psalm
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fielding to this entry?)
  35. To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state.
    to set a broken bone
  36. (masonry) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.
  37. (obsolete) To wager in gambling; to risk.
    • Shakespeare
      I have set my life upon a cast, / And I will stand the hazard of the die.
  38. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.
    • Dryden
      High on their heads, with jewels richly set, / Each lady wore a radiant coronet.
    • Wordsworth
      pastoral dales thin set with modern farms
  39. (obsolete) To value; to rate; used with at.
    • Shakespeare
      Be you contented, wearing now the garland, / To have a son set your decrees at naught.
    • Shakespeare
      I do not set my life at a pin's fee.
  40. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign.
    to set a good example; to set lessons to be learned
  41. (Scotland) To suit; to become.
    It sets him ill.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

set (plural sets)

  1. A punch for setting nails in wood.
    nail set
  2. A device for receiving broadcast radio waves (or, more recently, broadcast data); a radio or television.
    television set
  3. Alternative form of sett: a hole made and lived in by a badger.
  4. Alternative form of sett: pattern of threads and yarns.
  5. Alternative form of sett: piece of quarried stone.
  6. (horticulture) A small tuber or bulb used instead of seed, particularly onion sets and potato sets.
  7. The amount the teeth of a saw protrude to the side in order to create the kerf.
  8. (obsolete, rare) That which is staked; a wager; hence, a gambling game.
    • Shakespeare
      We will in France, by God's grace, play a set / Shall strike his father's crown into the hazard.
    • Dryden
      That was but civil war, an equal set.
  9. (engineering) Permanent change of shape caused by excessive strain, as from compression, tension, bending, twisting, etc.
    the set of a spring
  10. (piledriving) A piece placed temporarily upon the head of a pile when the latter cannot otherwise be reached by the weight, or hammer.
  11. (printing, dated) The width of the body of a type.
  12. A young oyster when first attached.
  13. Collectively, the crop of young oysters in any locality.
  14. A series or group of something. (Note the similar meaning in Etymology 2, Noun)
  15. (colloquial) The manner, state, or quality of setting or fitting; fit.
    the set of a coat
  16. The camber of a curved roofing tile.
Translations

Adjective

set (comparative more set, superlative most set)

  1. Fixed in position.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.   Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  2. Rigid, solidified.
  3. Ready, prepared.
    on your marks, get set, go!;  on your marks, set, go!
  4. Intent, determined (to do something).
    set on getting to his destination
  5. Prearranged.
    a set menu
  6. Fixed in one’s opinion.
    I’m set against the idea of smacking children to punish them.
  7. (of hair) Fixed in a certain style.
Synonyms
Translations

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English set, sete, sette (that which is set, the act of setting, seat), from Old English set (setting, seat, a place where people remain, habitation, camp, entrenchment, a place where animals are kept, stall, fold) and Old English seten (a set, shoot, slip, branch; a nursery, plantation; that which is planted or set; a cultivated place; planting, cultivation; a setting, putting; a stopping; occupied land), related to Old English settan (to set). Compare Middle Low German gesette (a set, suite), Old English gesetl (assembly). According to Skeat, in senses denoting a group of things or persons, representing an alteration of sept, from Old French sette (a religious sect), from Medieval Latin secta (retinue), from Latin secta (a faction). See sect. It is quite possible that the modern word is more of a merger between both, however.

Noun

set (plural sets)

  1. A young plant fit for setting out; a slip; shoot.
  2. A rudimentary fruit.
  3. The setting of the sun or other luminary; (by extension) the close of the day.
    • Tennyson
      the set of day
    • Shakespeare
      The weary sun hath made a golden set.
  4. (literally and figuratively) General movement; direction; drift; tendency.
    Here and there, amongst individuals alive to the particular evils of the age, and watching the very set of the current, there may have been even a more systematic counteraction applied to the mischief. Thomas De Quincey.
  5. A matching collection of similar things. (Note the similar meaning in Etymology 1, Noun)
    a set of tables
  6. A collection of various objects for a particular purpose.
    a set of tools
  7. An object made up of several parts.
    a set of steps
  8. (set theory) A collection of zero or more objects, possibly infinite in size, and disregarding any order or repetition of the objects which may be contained within it.
  9. (in plural, “sets”, mathematics, informal) Set theory.
  10. A group of people, usually meeting socially.
    the country set
  11. The scenery for a film or play.
  12. (dance) The initial or basic formation of dancers.
  13. (exercise (sport)) A group of repetitions of a single exercise performed one after the other without rest.
    • 1974, Charles Gaines & George Butler, Pumping Iron: The Art and Sport of Bodybuilding, page 22.
      This is the fourth set of benchpresses.
  14. (tennis) A complete series of games, forming part of a match.
  15. (volleyball) A complete series of points, forming part of a match.
  16. (volleyball) The act of directing the ball to a teammate for an attack.
  17. (music) A musical performance by a band, disc jockey, etc., consisting of several musical pieces.
  18. (music) A drum kit, a drum set.
    He plays the set on Saturdays.
  19. (Britain, education) A class group in a subject where pupils are divided by ability.
    • 2012 April 26, “Themes: Pupil grouping and organisation of classes”, in (Please provide the title of the work), Department for Education:
      Looking at pupil attainment, the study found that students with the same Key Stage 3 scores could have their GCSE grade raised or lowered by up to half a grade as a result of being placed in a higher or lower set.
  20. (poker, slang) Three of a kind, especially if two cards are in one's hand and the third is a on the board. Compare trips (three of a kind, especially with two cards on the board and one in one's hand).[1]
Synonyms
Hypernyms
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

set (third-person singular simple present sets, present participle setting, simple past and past participle setted)

  1. (Britain, education) To divide a class group in a subject according to ability
    • 2008, Patricia Murphy, Robert McCormick, Knowledge and Practice: Representations and Identities
      In setted classes, students are brought together because they are believed to be of similar 'ability'. Yet, setted lessons are often conducted as though students are not only similar, but identical—in terms of ability, preferred learning style and pace of working.
    • 2002, Jo Boaler, Experiencing School Mathematics: Traditional and Reform Approaches and Their Impact on Student Learning
      At Amber Hill, setting was a high-profile concept, and the students were frequently reminded of the set to which they belonged.

References

  1. Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. ISBN 978-1880069523

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: let · world · thing · #195: set · told · both · having

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Noun

set (plural [please provide])

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter Z/z.

Catalan

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set
    Ordinal : setè
    Multiplier : sèptuple
Catalan Wikipedia article on set

Etymology

From Old Provençal [Term?], from Latin septem (seven), from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Numeral

set m, f

  1. (cardinal) seven

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. seven

Crimean Tatar

Noun

set

  1. sofa, couch, settee

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛt/
  • Homophone: sed
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From English set.

Noun

set m

  1. (tennis, volleyball) set (part of a match in sports like tennis and volleyball)
Declension
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Noun

set

  1. genitive plural of sto

Danish

Verb

set

  1. past participle of se

Derived terms

  • sådan set

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛt/

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. (tennis) set

Synonyms

Anagrams


Italian

Etymology

Borrowing from English set.

Noun

set m (invariable)

  1. set (group of things, maths, tennis, cinema etc)

Anagrams


Ladin

Ladin cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set
    Ordinal : setim

Etymology

From Latin septem.

Adjective

set

  1. seven

Noun

set m (uncountable)

  1. seven

Latin

Pronunciation

Conjunction

set

  1. Alternative form of sed
    • c. 1300, Tractatus de Ponderibus et Mensuris
    • sexies viginti petre faciunt carrum plumbi scilicet magnum carrum London’ set carrus del Peek est multo minus.
      • Six times twenty stone make the load of lead, scilicet the great London load, but the load of Peek is much less.

Lojban

Rafsi

set

  1. rafsi of senta.

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sɛt]

Verb

set

  1. supine of seś

Mauritian Creole

Mauritian Creole cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set
    Ordinal : setiem

Etymology

From French sept.

Numeral

set

  1. (cardinal) seven

Michif

Etymology

From French sept.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sɛt]

Numeral

set

  1. seven

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

set

  1. present tense of setja, setje, setta and sette
  2. imperative of setja and setje

Novial

Novial cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : set
    Ordinal : setesmi

Numeral

set

  1. (cardinal) seven



Old English

Etymology

Compare the verb settan. Compare Old Norse sæti (whence modern English seat), Old High German gesazi (German Gesäß), Middle Dutch gesaete, from Proto-Germanic *sētiją.

Noun

set n

  1. seat

Related terms

  • ġeset

Old French

Etymology 1

From Latin septem.

Numeral

set

  1. seven
Descendants

Etymology 2

see savoir

Verb

set

  1. third-person singular present indicative of savoir
Descendants

Polish

Etymology

Borrowing from English set.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛt/

Noun

set m inan

  1. (sports) set; part of the game in tennis, badminton, or volleyball.

Declension


Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowing from English set.

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. (tennis, volleyball) set (subdivision of a match)

Romansch

Etymology 1

From Latin septem, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Number

set

  1. (cardinal, Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) seven
Alternative forms

Etymology 2

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis (perishing, decrease).

Noun

set f

  1. (Sutsilvan) thirst
Alternative forms
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) said
  • (Sursilvan) seit
  • (Surmiran) seid

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowing from English set.

Noun

set m (plural sets)

  1. (tennis) set

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology

Borrowing from English set.

Noun

set n

  1. a set (matching collection of items)
  2. a set (in tennis)

Declension

Inflection of set 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative set setet set seten
Genitive sets setets sets setens

See also


Walloon

Etymology

From Latin septem, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

Numeral

set

  1. seven

Welsh

Verb

set

  1. Contraction of baset.