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Webster 1913 Edition


Lot

Lot

(lŏt)
,
Noun.
[AS.
hlot
; akin to
hleítan
to cast lots, OS.
hlōt
lot, D.
lot
, G.
loos
, OHG.
lōz
, Icel.
hlutr
, Sw.
lott
, Dan.
lod
, Goth.
hlauts
. Cf.
Allot
,
Lotto
,
Lottery
.]
1.
That which happens without human design or forethought; chance; accident; hazard; fortune; fate.
But save my life, which
lot
before your foot doth lay.
Spenser.
2.
Anything (as a die, pebble, ball, or slip of paper) used in determining a question by chance, or without man’s choice or will;
as, to cast or draw
lots
.
The
lot
is cast into the lap, but the whole disposing thereof is of the Lord.
Prov. xvi. 33.
If we draw
lots
, he speeds.
Shakespeare
3.
The part, or fate, which falls to one, as it were, by chance, or without his planning.
O visions ill foreseen! Each day's
lot's

Enough to bear.
Milton.
He was but born to try
The
lot
of man – to suffer and to die.
Pope.
4.
A separate portion; a number of things taken collectively; all objects sold in a single purchase transaction;
as, a
lot
of stationery
; – colloquially, sometimes of people;
as, a sorry
lot
; a bad
lot
.
I, this winter, met with a very large
lot
of English heads, chiefly of the reign of James I.
Walpole.
5.
A distinct portion or plot of land, usually smaller than a field;
as, a building
lot
in a city
.
The defendants leased a house and
lot
in the city of New York.
Kent.
6.
A large quantity or number; a great deal;
as, to spend a
lot
of money; to waste a
lot
of time on line;
lots
of people think so.
[Colloq.]
He wrote to her . . . he might be detained in London by a
lot
of business.
W. Black.
7.
A prize in a lottery.
[Obs.]
Evelyn.
To cast in one's lot with
,
to share the fortunes of.
To cast lots
,
to use or throw a die, or some other instrument, by the unforeseen turn or position of which, an event is by previous agreement determined.
To draw lots
,
to determine an event, or make a decision, by drawing one thing from a number whose marks are concealed from the drawer.
To pay scot and lot
,
to pay taxes according to one's ability. See
Scot
.

Lot

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Lotted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Lotting
.]
To allot; to sort; to portion.
[R.]
To lot on
or
To lot upon
,
to count or reckon upon; to expect with pleasure.
[Colloq. U. S.]

Webster 1828 Edition


Lot

LOT

,
Noun.
1.
That which, in human speech, is called chance, hazard, fortune; but in strictness of language, is the determination of Providence; as, the land shall be divided by lot. Num. 26.
2.
That by which the fate or portion of one is determined; that by which an event is committed to chance, that is, to the determination of Providence; as, to cast lots; to draw lots.
The lot is cast into the lap, but the whole disposing thereof is of the Lord. Prov. 16.
3.
The part, division or fate which falls to one by chance, that is, by divine determination.
The second lot came forth to Simeon. Josh. 19.
He was but born to try the lot of man, to suffer and to die.
4.
A distinct portion or parcel; as a lot of goods; a lot of boards.
5.
Proportion or share of taxes; as, to pay scot and lot.
6.
In the United States, a piece or division of land; perhaps originally assigned by drawing lots, but now any portion, piece or division. So we say, a man has a lot of land in Broadway, or in the meadow; he has a lot in the plain, or on the mountain; he has a home-lot, a house-lot, a wood-lot.
The defendants leased a house and lot in the city of New York.
To cast lots, is to use or throw a die, or some other instrument, by the unforseen turn or position of which, an event is by previous agreement determined.
To draw lots, to determine an event by drawing one thing from a number whose marks are concealed from the drawer, and thus determining an event.

LOT

,
Verb.
T.
To allot; to assign; to distribute; to sort; to catalogue; to portion.

Definition 2022


Lot

Lot

See also: lot and lọt

English

Proper noun

Lot

  1. A nephew of Abraham in the Bible and Quran.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Genesis 12:5:
      And Abram took Sarai his wife, and Lot his brother's son, and all their substance that they had gathered, and the souls that they had gotten in Haran; and they went forth to go into the land of Canaan; and into the land of Canaan they came.
  2. A male given name of biblical origin; rare today.

Translations

Anagrams


French

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Lot m

  1. Lot (Department of France)

See also


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːt/

Etymology 1

From Middle High German lōt, from Old High German *lōt, from Proto-Germanic *laudą. Compare Dutch lood, English lead.

Noun

Lot n (genitive Lots or Lotes, plural Lote)

  1. plummet
  2. solder
Declension
Synonyms

Etymology 2

From Hebrew לוֹט (lot).

Proper noun

Lot m (genitive Lots)

  1. Lot

Spanish

Proper noun

Lot m

  1. Lot (Biblical character)
    • 1602, La Santa Biblia (antigua versión de Casiodoro de Reina), rev., Génesis 12:5
      Y tomó Abram á Sarai su mujer, y á Lot hijo de su hermano, y toda su hacienda que habían ganado, y las almas que habían adquirido en Harán, y salieron parair á tierra de Canaán; y á tierra de Canaán llegaron.

lot

lot

See also: Lot and lọt

English

Noun

lot (plural lots)

Lot, noun definition 5
  1. A large quantity or number; a great deal.
    to spend a lot of money;  lots of people think so
    • W. Black
      He wrote to her [] he might be detained in London by a lot of business.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 3, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out. Clams was fairly scarce over that side of the bay and ought to fetch a fair price.
  2. A separate portion; a number of things taken collectively.
    a lot of stationery
  3. One or more items auctioned or sold as a unit, separate from other items.
  4. (informal) A number of people taken collectively.
    a sorry lot; a bad lot
  5. A distinct portion or plot of land, usually smaller than a field.
    a building lot in a city
    • Kent
      The defendants leased a house and lot in the city of New York.
  6. That which happens without human design or forethought; chance; accident; hazard; fortune; fate.
    • Spenser
      But save my life, which lot before your foot doth lay.
  7. Anything (as a die, pebble, ball, or slip of paper) used in determining a question by chance, or without human choice or will.
    to cast lots;  to draw lots
    • Bible, Proverbs xvi. 33
      The lot is cast into the lap, but the whole disposing thereof is of the Lord.
    • Shakespeare
      If we draw lots, he speeds.
  8. The part, or fate, that falls to one, as it were, by chance, or without his planning.
    • Milton
      O visions ill foreseen! Each day's lot's / Enough to bear.
    • Alexander Pope
      He was but born to try / The lot of man to suffer and to die.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Book III, chapter ii
      [] as Jones alone was discovered, the poor lad bore not only the whole smart, but the whole blame; both which fell again to his lot on the following occasion.
    • C-3PO
      "We seem to be made to suffer. It's our lot in life." in Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.
  9. A prize in a lottery.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Evelyn to this entry?)
  10. Allotment; lottery.
    • 1990: Donald Kagan, Pericles of Athens and the Birth of Democracy, chapter 2: “Politician”, page 40 (Guild Publishing; CN 2239)
      The Greeks expected their leaders to show physical courage, whether in the athletic arena or in battle, as well as piety, generosity, and nobility. Cimon had risen to power chiefly because of his military prowess, and any rival must be able to show at least honorable service and military competence. By this time, moreover, the generals were coming to be the most important political figures in Athens. Archons served only for one year and, since 487/6, they were chosen by lot. Generals, on the other hand, were chosen by direct election and could be reelected without limit.
  11. (definite, the lot) All members of a set; everything.
    The table was loaded with food, but by evening there was nothing but crumbs; we had eaten the lot.
    If I were in charge, I'd fire the lot of them.
  12. An old unit of weight used in many European countries from the Middle Ages, often defined as 1/30 or 1/32 of a (local) pound.

Synonyms

  • (large quantity or number): load, mass, pile
  • (number of things taken collectively): batch, collection, group, set
  • (informal: a number of people taken collectively): crowd, gang, group
  • (distinct portion or plot of land): allotment, parcel, plot
  • (that which happens without human design or forethought): destiny, fate, fortune
  • (anything used in determining a question by chance):
  • (fate that falls to one by chance):
  • (prize in a lottery): prize
  • See also Wikisaurus:lot

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

lot (third-person singular simple present lots, present participle lotting, simple past and past participle lotted)

  1. (transitive, dated) To allot; to sort; to apportion.
  2. (US, informal, dated) To count or reckon (on or upon).

Anagrams


Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *lā(i)ta, and adjective in *-to-, from Proto-Indo-European *lēi 'to pour'[1].

Noun

lot m (indefinite plural lotë, definite singular loti, definite plural lotët)

  1. tear (from the eye)
    Gjak, lot dhe djersëBlood, tears and sweat
Derived terms

References

  1. Orel, Vladimir (1998), lot”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, page 231

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

lot n (plural loten, diminutive lotje n)

  1. destiny, fate
  2. lottery ticket

Anagrams


French

Etymology

From Frankish *lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lo/

Noun

lot m (plural lots)

  1. share (of inheritance)
  2. plot (of land)
  3. batch (of goods for sale)
  4. lot (at auction)
  5. prize (in lottery)
  6. lot, fate
  7. (slang) babe

Kurdish

Noun

lot ?

  1. jump

Lojban

Rafsi

lot

  1. rafsi of bloti.

Norman

Etymology

From Frankish *lot, from Proto-Germanic *hlutą.

Noun

lot m (plural lots)

  1. (Guernsey) lot (at auction)

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

lot

  1. simple past of la (Etymology 1)

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔt/

Noun

lot m inan

  1. flight

Declension


Scottish Gaelic

Noun

lot m, gen lota, pl lotan

  1. sore, wound
  2. sting

Tatar

Noun

lot

  1. A unit of weight: 1 lot = 3 mısqal = 12.797 g (archaic)

Declension


West Frisian

Noun

lot c (plural lotten)

  1. fate, destiny