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Webster 1913 Edition


Band

Band

(bănd)
,
Noun.
[OE.
band
,
bond
, Icel.
band
; akin to G., Sw., & D.
band
, OHG.
bant
, Goth.
bandi
, Skr.
bandha
a binding,
bandh
to bind, for
bhanda
,
bhandh
, also to E.
bend
,
bind
. In sense 7, at least, it is fr. F.
bande
, from OHG.
bant
. √90. See
Bind
,
Verb.
T.
, and cf.
Bend
,
Bond
, 1st
Bandy
.]
1.
A fillet, strap, or any narrow ligament with which a thing is encircled, or fastened, or by which a number of things are tied, bound together, or confined; a fetter.
Every one’s
bands
were loosed.
Acts xvi. 26.
2.
(Arch.)
(a)
A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of color, or of brickwork, etc.
(b)
In Gothic architecture, the molding, or suite of moldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts.
3.
That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie.
“To join in Hymen's bands.”
Shak.
4.
A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries.
5.
pl.
Two strips of linen hanging from the neck in front as part of a clerical, legal, or academic dress.
6.
A narrow strip of cloth or other material on any article of dress, to bind, strengthen, ornament, or complete it.
Band and gusset and seam.”
Hood.
7.
A company of persons united in any common design, especially a body of armed men.
Troops of horsemen with his
bands
of foot.
Shakespeare
8.
A number of musicians who play together upon portable musical instruments, especially those making a loud sound, as certain wind instruments (trumpets, clarinets, etc.), and drums, or cymbals;
as, a high school's marching
band
.
9.
(Bot.)
A space between elevated lines or ribs, as of the fruits of umbelliferous plants.
10.
(Zool.)
A stripe, streak, or other mark transverse to the axis of the body.
11.
(Mech.)
A belt or strap.
12.
A bond.
[Obs.]
“Thy oath and band.”
Shak.
13.
Pledge; security.
[Obs.]
Spenser.

Band

(bănd)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Banded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Banding
.]
1.
To bind or tie with a band.
2.
To mark with a band.
3.
To unite in a troop, company, or confederacy.
Banded against his throne.”
Milton.
Banded architrave
,
Banded pier
,
Banded shaft
, etc.
(Arch.)
,
an architrave, pier, shaft, etc., of which the regular profile is interrupted by blocks or projections crossing it at right angles.

Band

,
Verb.
I.
To confederate for some common purpose; to unite; to conspire together.
Certain of the Jews
banded
together.
Acts xxiii. 12.

Band

,
Verb.
T.
To bandy; to drive away.
[Obs.]

Band

,
imp.
of
Bind
.
[Obs.]
Spenser.

Webster 1828 Edition


Band

BAND

, n.[See Bind and Bend.]
1.
A fillet; a cord; a tie; a chain; any narrow ligament with which a thing is bound, tied or fastened, or by which a number of things are confined together.
2.
In architecture, any flat low member of molding, broad but not deep, called also fascia, face or plinth.
3.
Figuratively, any chain; any means of restraint; that which draws or confines.
4.
Means of union or connection between persons; as, Hymen's bands.
5.
Any thing bound round or encircling another.
6.
Something worn about the neck; as the bands of clergymen.
7.
A company of soldiers; the body of men united under one flag or ensign. Also, indefinitely, a troop, a body of armed men.
2 Kings vi.
8.
A company of persons united in any common design; as a band of brothers.
9.
A slip of canvas, sewed across a sail to strengthen it.
The band of pensioners in England, is a company of 120 gentlemen, who receive a yearly allowance of f100st., for attending the king on solemn occasions.
The bands of a saddle are two pieces of iron nailed upon the bows, to hold them in their proper situation.

BAND

,
Verb.
T.
To bind together; to bind over with a band.
2.
To unite in a troop, company or confederacy.

BAND

,
Verb.
I.
To unite; to associate; to confederate for some common purpose. Acts xxiii.

Definition 2022


Band

Band

See also: band, bånd, and *band

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bant]
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

Band n (genitive Bandes or Bands, plural Bänder or Bande, diminutive Bändchen n)

  1. tape, ribbon
  2. (anatomy) A ligament
  3. band or tie holding items together
  4. belt (conveyor belt, fan belt, etc.)
  5. band of the spectrum
  6. (figuratively, pl. Bande) intimate bond to a person
  7. (figuratively, pl. Bande) dependence, social bond
  8. (poetic, pl. Bande) shackle
Usage notes
  • The normal plural is Bänder.
  • The plural Bande is used in the figurative sense of “bond” and in the poetic meaning “shackles” (for which usually Fessel is used). In early modern German, the two plurals were widely interchangeable.
Declension
Plural Bänder
Plural Bande
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle High German bant.

Alternative forms

  • Bd. (abbreviation)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bant]
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

Band m (genitive Bandes or Bands, plural Bände)

  1. A volume of a multi-volume set of books
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 3

From English band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bɛnt]

Noun

Band f (genitive Band, plural Bands)

  1. A modern music band.
Declension

Luxembourgish

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

Band n (plural Bänner)

  1. ribbon, band
  2. tape, band (e.g. magnetic tape)
  3. (anatomy) ligament
  4. hoop (on a barrel)

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bænt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt

Noun

Band f (plural Banten)

  1. band (musical group)
  2. band, gang (e.g. of thieves)
  3. crowd, group
Synonyms
  • (musical band): Museksgrupp

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

Band m (plural Bänn)

  1. volume (one of a set of books)

band

band

See also: Band, bånd, and *band

English

Noun

band (plural bands)

  1. A strip of material used for strengthening or coupling.
    1. A strip of material wrapped around things to hold them together.
      • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 10, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
        The Jones man was looking at her hard. Now he reached into the hatch of his vest and fetched out a couple of cigars, everlasting big ones, with gilt bands on them.
    2. A narrow strip of cloth or other material on clothing, to bind, strengthen, or ornament it.
    3. A strip along the spine of a book where the pages are attached.
    4. A belt or strap that is part of a machine.
  2. (architecture) A strip of decoration.
    1. A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of colour, or of brickwork.
    2. In Gothic architecture, the moulding, or suite of mouldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts.
  3. That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie.
  4. A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries.
  5. (in the plural) Two strips of linen hanging from the neck in front as part of a clerical, legal, or academic dress.
  6. (physics) A part of the radio spectrum.
  7. (physics) A group of energy levels in a solid state material.
    valence band; conduction band
  8. (obsolete) A bond.
  9. (obsolete) Pledge; security.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  10. (chiefly US) A ring, such as a wedding ring (wedding band), or a ring put on a bird's leg to identify it.
  11. (sciences) Any distinguishing line formed by chromatography, electrophoresis etc
  12. (slang, hiphop, often in the plural) A wad of money totaling $10K, held together by a band; (by extension) money
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

band (third-person singular simple present bands, present participle banding, simple past and past participle banded)

  1. (transitive) To fasten with a band.
  2. (transitive, ornithology) To fasten an identifying band around the leg of (a bird).
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English band, from Old French bande, from Old Provençal banda (regiment of troops), probably from Proto-Germanic *bandī or Gothic, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie, bind).

Noun

A music band

band (plural bands)

  1. A group of musicians who perform together as an ensemble, usually for a professional recording artist.
  2. A type of orchestra originally playing janissary music.
  3. A marching band.
  4. A group of people loosely united for a common purpose (a band of thieves).
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum , The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      "My third command to the Winged Monkeys," said Glinda, "shall be to carry you to your forest. Then, having used up the powers of the Golden Cap, I shall give it to the King of the Monkeys, that he and his band may thereafter be free for evermore."
  5. (anthropology) A small group of people living in a simple society.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      But in the meantime Robin Hood and his band lived quietly in Sherwood Forest, without showing their faces abroad, for Robin knew that it would not be wise for him to be seen in the neighborhood of Nottingham, those in authority being very wroth with him.
  6. (Canada) A group of aboriginals that has official recognition as an organized unit by the federal government of Canada.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Cantonese: band
  • German (colloquial, "Denglish"): Band
Translations

Verb

band (third-person singular simple present bands, present participle banding, simple past and past participle banded)

  1. (intransitive) To group together for a common purpose; to confederate.
    • Bible, Acts xxiii. 12
      Certain of the Jews banded together.
Derived terms
Translations

See also


Chinese

Etymology

Borrowing from English band.

Pronunciation


Noun

band

  1. (Cantonese) band   (Classifier: )

Synonyms

References


Danish

Etymology 1

From English band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baːnd/, [b̥æːnd̥]

Noun

band n (singular definite bandet, plural indefinite band or bands)

  1. band
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Old Norse bann (ban, curse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ban/, [b̥ænˀ]

Noun

band n (singular definite bandet, not used in plural form)

  1. (rare) excommunication

Etymology 3

From bande (swear, curse), from Old Norse banna (ban, curse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ban/, [b̥ænˀ]

Noun

band c, n

  1. (rare) swear word

Dutch

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

band m, n (plural banden, diminutive bandje n)

  1. connection, liaison, bond m
  2. band (all English senses, above, except for group of musicians) m
  3. tire/tyre (e.g. a car tyre) m
  4. tape (magnetic tape, video tape) m
  5. bank (the bank of a pool table) m
  6. belt (a martial arts belt) m
  7. belt (conveyor belt) m
  8. ribbon n
  9. bond, tie m
Related terms

Etymology 2

Borrowing from English band.

Noun

band m (plural bands, diminutive bandje n)

  1. (music) band

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Verb

band

  1. Past tense of binden.

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pant]
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

band n (genitive singular bands, nominative plural bönd)

  1. a string
  2. yarn
  3. (figuratively, in the plural) ties, connection, relations
  4. binding (of a book)
  5. (music) tie
  6. (music, slang) a musical band

Declension

Synonyms

Derived terms

Related terms


Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • bånd (see this word for common usage)

Etymology

From English band (in this sense)

Noun

band n (definite singular bandet, indefinite plural band, definite plural banda or bandene)

  1. (music) a band; group of (rock) musicians

Derived terms

References


Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse band.

Pronunciation

Noun

band n

  1. a band, a ribbon, a tape; a strip of material
  2. a band, an ensemble, an orchestra; group of musicians
  3. a band, a gang; band of robbers
  4. (physics) a band; a part of radio spectrum
  5. (physics) a band; a group of energy levels
  6. an audio tape or a video tape
  7. a cassette of audio or video tape
  8. a tie, a connection, a relation; from a person to another person or to a place

Declension

Inflection of band 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative band bandet band banden
Genitive bands bandets bands bandens

Related terms

Derived terms

Verb

band

  1. past tense of binda.