Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


More

More

(mōr)
,
Noun.
[AS.
mōr
. See
Moor
a waste.]
A hill.
[Prov. Eng.]
Halliwell.

More

,
Noun.
[AS.
more
,
moru
; akin to G.
möhre
carrot, OHG.
moraha
,
morha
.]
A root.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

More

,
Adj.
, com
par.
[Positive wanting;
sup
erl.
Most
(mōst)
.]
[OE.
more
,
mare
, and (orig. neut. and adv.)
mo
,
ma
, AS.
māra
, and (as neut. and adv.)
mā
; akin to D.
meer
, OS.
mēr
, G.
mehr
, OHG.
mēro
,
mēr
, Icel.
meiri
,
meirr
, Dan.
meere
,
meer
, Sw.
mera
,
mer
, Goth.
maiza
, a.,
mais
, adv., and perh. to L.
major
greater, compar. of
magnus
great, and
magis
, adv., more. √103. Cf.
Most
,
uch
,
Major
.]
1.
Greater; superior; increased;
as:
(a)
Greater in quality, amount, degree, quality, and the like; with the singular.
He gat
more
money.
Chaucer.
If we procure not to ourselves
more
woe.
Milton.
More, in this sense, was formerly used in connection with some other qualifying word, – a, the, this, their, etc., – which now requires the substitution of greater, further, or the like, for more.
Whilst sisters nine, which dwell on Parnasse height,
Do make them music for their
more
delight.
Spenser.
The
more
part knew not wherefore they were come together.
Acts xix. 32.
Wrong not that wrong with a
more
contempt.
Shakespeare
(b)
Greater in number; exceeding in numbers; – with the plural.
The people of the children of Israel are
more
and mightier than we.
Ex. i. 9.
2.
Additional; other;
as, he wept because there were no
more
worlds to conquer
.
With open arms received one poet
more
.
Pope.

More

,
Noun.
1.
A greater quantity, amount, or number; that which exceeds or surpasses in any way what it is compared with.
And the children of Israel did so, and gathered, some
more
, some less.
Ex. xvi. 17.
2.
That which is in addition; something other and further; an additional or greater amount.
They that would have
more
and
more
can never have enough.
L’Estrange.
O! That pang where
more
than madness lies.
Byron.
Any more
.
(a)
Anything or something additional or further;
as, I do not need
any more
.
(b)
Adverbially:
Further; beyond a certain time;
as, do not think
any more
about it
.
No more
,
not anything more; nothing in addition.
The more and less
,
the high and low.
[Obs.]
Shak.
“All cried, both less and more.”
Chaucer.

More

,
adv.
1.
In a greater quantity; in or to a greater extent or degree.
(a)
With a verb or participle.
Admiring
more

The riches of Heaven's pavement.
Milton.
(b)
With an adjective or adverb (instead of the suffix -er) to form the comparative degree;
as,
more
durable;
more
active;
more
sweetly
.
Happy here, and
more
happy hereafter.
Bacon.
☞ Double comparatives were common among writers of the Elizabeth period, and for some time later; as, more brighter; more dearer.
The duke of Milan
And his
more
braver daughter.
Shakespeare
2.
In addition; further; besides; again.
Yet once
more
, O ye laurels, and once
more
,
Ye myrtles brown, with ivy never sere,
I come to pluck your berries harsh and crude.
Milton.
More and more
,
with continual increase.
“Amon trespassed more and more.”
2 Chron. xxxiii. 23.
The more
,
to a greater degree; by an added quantity; for a reason already specified.
The more – the more
,
by how much more – by so much more.
The more he praised it in himself, the more he seems to suspect that in very deed it was not in him.”
Milton.
To be no more
,
to have ceased to be;
as, Cassius
is no more
; Troy
is no more
.

Those oracles which set the world in flames,
Nor ceased to burn till kingdoms were
no more
.
Byron.

More

,
Verb.
T.
To make more; to increase.
[Obs.]
Gower.

Webster 1828 Edition


More

MORE

,
Adj.
[L. magis; mare for mager; but this is conjecture.]
1.
Greater in quality, degree or amount; in a general sense; as more land; more water; more courage; more virtue; more power or wisdom; more love; more praise; more light. It is applicable to every thing, material or immaterial.
2.
Greater in number; exceeding in numbers; as more men; more virtues; more years.
The children of Israel are more than we. Ex.1.
3.
Greater.
The more part knew not why they had come together. Acts.19.
4.
Added to some former number; additional.
But Montague demands one labor more.

MORE

,
adv.
To a greater degree.
Israel loved Joseph more than all his children. Gen.37.
1.
It is used with the.
They hated him yet the more. Gen.37.
2.
It is used to modify an adjective and form the comparative degree, having the same force and effect as the termination er, in monosyllables; as more wise; more illustrious; more contemptible; more durable. It may be used before all adjectives which admit of comparison, and must be used before polysyllables.
3.
A second or another time; again. I expected to hear of him mo more.
The dove returned not to him again any more. Gen.8.
No more, not continuing; existing no longer; gone; deceased or destroyed. Cassius is no more. Troy is no more.
No more is used in commands, in an elliptical form of address. No more! that is, say no more; let me hear no more. In this use however, more, when the sentence is complete, is a noun or substitute for a noun.
Much more, in a greater degree or with more readiness; more abundantly.
More and more, with continual increase.
Amon trespassed more and more. 2 Chron. 33.

MORE

, a noun or substitute for a noun. A greater quantity, amount or number.
They gathered some more, some less. Ex.16.
They were more who died by hail-stones, than they whom the children of Israel slew with the sword. Josh.10.
God do so to thee and more also. 1 Sam.3.
There were more than forty who had made this conspiracy. Acts.23.
1.
Greater thing; other thing; something further. Here we rest; we can do no more. He conquered his enemies; he did more, he conquered himself.

MORE

,
Verb.
T.
To make more.

Definition 2020


More

More

See also: more, moré, môre, moře, -more, and Appendix:Variations of "mor"

English

Alternative forms

Proper noun

More

  1. The Volta-Congo language of the Mossi people, mainly spoken in part of Burkina Faso.
Translations

External links

Etymology 2

From Scottish Gaelic mór (big). Also a variant of Moore.

Alternative forms

Proper noun

More

  1. A surname.

External links

Anagrams


French

Noun

More m (plural Mores)

  1. Alternative spelling of Maure; Moor

Anagrams


German

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin mora.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmoːʀə/
  • Homophone: Moore

Noun

More f (genitive More, plural Moren)

  1. (phonology) mora

Declension


Middle French

Noun

More m (plural Mores)

  1. Moor (person of Berber descent)

more

more

See also: More, moré, môre, moře, møre, and -more

English

Alternative forms

Determiner

more

  1. Comparative form of many: in greater number. (Used for a discrete quantity.)
    More people are arriving.
    There are more ways to do this than I can count.
    • 2014 June 14, It's a gas”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8891:
      One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains. Isolating a city’s effluent and shipping it away in underground sewers has probably saved more lives than any medical procedure except vaccination.
  2. Comparative form of much: in greater quantity, amount, or proportion. (Used for a continuous quantity.)
    I want more soup; I need more time
    There's more caffeine in my coffee than in the coffee you get in most places.
    • 2013 June 29, A punch in the gut”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 72-3:
      Mostly, the microbiome is beneficial. It helps with digestion and enables people to extract a lot more calories from their food than would otherwise be possible. Research over the past few years, however, has implicated it in diseases from atherosclerosis to asthma to autism.
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

more (not comparable)

  1. To a greater degree or extent. [from 10thc.]
    He walks more in the morning these days.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.   Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  2. (now poetic) In negative constructions: any further, any longer; any more. [from 10thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d’Arthur, Bk.XV, Ch.II:
      Than was there pees betwyxte thys erle and thys Aguaurs, and grete surete that the erle sholde never warre agaynste hym more.
  3. Used alone to form the comparative form of adjectives and adverbs. [from 13thc.]
    You're more beautiful than I ever imagined.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      Then we relapsed into a discomfited silence, and wished we were anywhere else. But Miss Thorn relieved the situation by laughing aloud, and with such a hearty enjoyment that instead of getting angry and more mortified we began to laugh ourselves, and instantly felt better.
    • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, Geothermal Energy”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.
  4. (now dialectal or humorous) Used in addition to an inflected comparative form. (Standard until the 18thc.) [from 13thc.]
    I was more better at English than you.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

more (uncountable)

  1. An extra amount or extent.
Derived terms

See also

Etymology 2

From Middle English more, moore (carrot, parsnip) from Old English more, moru (carrot, parsnip) from Proto-Germanic *murhǭ (carrot), from Proto-Indo-European *mork- (edible herb, tuber). Akin to Old Saxon moraha (carrot), Old High German morha, moraha (root of a plant or tree) (German Möhre (carrot), Morchel (mushroom, morel)). More at morel.

Noun

more (plural mores)

  1. (obsolete) a carrot; a parsnip.
  2. (dialectal) a root; stock.
  3. A plant.

Etymology 3

From Middle English moren, from the noun. See above.

Verb

more (third-person singular simple present mores, present participle moring, simple past and past participle mored)

  1. (transitive) To root up.

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: when · if · there · #53: more · out · into · up

Anagrams


Albanian

Alternative forms

Etymology

According to Orel from the aoristic form of marr without a clear sense development. It could also be a remnant of a grammatical structure of a lost substrate language. It is the source of same interjection found in all Balkan languages

Interjection

more

  1. vocative particle used in a call to a man.

Usage notes

Can be placed before or after the noun, whereas bre can only be placed after.

Related terms


Basque

Noun

more

  1. purple

See also

Colors in Basque · koloreak (layout · text)
     gorri      berde      hori      ?      zuri
     {{{crimson}}}      ?      ?      ?      arrosa
     ?      urdin      laranja      gris      ?
     beltz      more      marroi      ?      ?

Danish

Etymology

Derived from moro (fun), which may be a compound of mod, from Old Norse móðr (mind) and ro, from Old Norse (rest).

Verb

more (imperative mor, infinitive at more, present tense morer, past tense morede, perfect tense har moret)

  1. To amuse, entertain

Derived terms

  • morskab c
  • morsom
  • morsomhed c

Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology

From Latin mora.

Noun

more m, f (plural moren, diminutive moretje n)

  1. The unit of length (short or long) in poetic metre

Anagrams


French

Pronunciation

Noun

more f (plural mores)

  1. (phonology) mora

Adjective

more m, f (plural mores)

  1. (dated) Alternative spelling of maure

Related terms

Anagrams


Italian

Noun

more f

  1. plural of mora

Verb

more

  1. (slang) Third-person singular indicative present of morire

Synonyms

Anagrams


Latin

Noun

mōre

  1. ablative singular of mōs

References


Latvian

Noun

more f (5 declension)

  1. (archaic) black woman

Maori

Noun

more

  1. taproot

Synonyms

  • tāmore

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

more (present tense morer; past tense and past participle mora or moret)

  1. amuse, entertain

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *murhō(n), *murhijō(n) (carrot), from Proto-Indo-European *mork- (edible herb, tuber). Akin to Old Saxon moraha (carrot), Old High German morha, moraha "root of a plant or tree" (German Möhre "carrot", Morchel "mushroom, morel"). More at more, morel.

Noun

more f

  1. carrot
  2. parsnip

Declension

Synonyms

Descendants


Portuguese

Pronunciation

Verb

more

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of morar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of morar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of morar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of morar

Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /môːre/
  • Hyphenation: mo‧re

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *morje, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun

mȏre n (Cyrillic spelling мо̑ре)

  1. sea
Declension

Derived terms
Synonyms

See also

  • Category:sh:Seas

Etymology 2

From Greek μωρέ (moré).

Interjection

mȏre (Cyrillic spelling мо̑ре)

  1. (Serbia) when spoken sharply, asserts that the speaker is stronger or older or more powerful than the addressee, sometimes expressing contempt or superiority
    • 1824, recorded by Vuk Stefanović Karadžić, Narodne srpske pjesme:
      »More, Marko, ne ori drumova!« / »More, Turci, ne gaz’te oranja!«
      »More, Marko, don’t plow up our roads!« / »More, Turks, don’t walk on my plowing!«
  2. (Serbia) when not spoken sharply, functions as a term of endearment or generic intensifier, cf. bre

Usage notes

More is most often used in addressing a single male, more rarely when addressing groups of males, and more rarely still when addressing females.

Related terms

References

  • Tomislav Maretić (editor) (1911), Rječnik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika, Volume 7, JAZU: Zagreb

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *morje, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun

more n (genitive singular mora, nominative plural moria, declension pattern of srdce)

  1. A body of salt water, sea.
  2. (colloquial) A huge amount, a plenty (+genitive)
    máme more času we have plenty of time

Declension

Derived terms

  • morský -á -é
  • zámorie n

Spanish

Verb

more

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of morar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of morar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of morar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of morar.

Welsh

Pronunciation

Noun

more

  1. Nasal mutation of bore (morning).

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bore fore more unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.