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Webster 1913 Edition


Mere

Mere

(mēr)
,
Noun.
[Written also
mar
.]
[OE.
mere
, AS.
mere
mere, sea; akin to D.
meer
lake, OS.
meri
sea, OHG.
meri
,
mari
, G.
meer
, Icel.
marr
, Goth.
marei
, Russ.
more
, W.
mor
, Ir. & Gael.
muir
, L.
mare
, and perh. to L.
mori
to die, and meaning originally, that which is dead, a waste. Cf.
Mortal
,
Marine
,
Marsh
,
Mermaid
,
Moor
.]
A pool or lake.
Drayton.
Tennyson.

Mere

,
Noun.
[Written also
meer
and
mear
.]
[AS.
gemǣre
. √269.]
A boundary.
Bacon.

Mere

(mēr)
,
Verb.
T.
To divide, limit, or bound.
[Obs.]
Which
meared
her rule with Africa.
Spenser.

Mere

,
Noun.
A mare.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.

Mere

(mēr)
,
Adj.
[
Sup
erl.
Merest
. The comparative is rarely or never used.]
[L.
merus
.]
1.
Unmixed; pure; entire; absolute; unqualified.
Then entered they the
mere
, main sea.
Chapman.
The sorrows of this world would be
mere
and unmixed.
Jer. Taylor.
2.
Only this, and nothing else; such, and no more; simple; bare;
as, a
mere
boy; a
mere
form.
From
mere
success nothing can be concluded in favor of any nation.
Atterbury.

Webster 1828 Edition


Mere

MERE

,
Adj.
[L. merus.] This or that only; distinct from any thing else.
From mere success nothing can be concluded in favor of a nation.
What if the head,the eye or ear repin'd
To serve mere engines to the ruling mind?
1.
Absolute; entire.

MERE

,
Noun.
[L. mare. See Moor.] A pool or lake.

MERE

,
Noun.
[Gr. to divide.] A boundary; used chiefly in the compound, mere-stone.

MERE

,
Verb.
T.
To divide, limit or bound.

Definition 2021


Mere

Mere

See also: mere, mère, merë, -mere, and mere-

Hawaiian

Proper noun

Mere

  1. A female given name used in the 19th century.

Related terms

References


Maori

Proper noun

Mere

  1. A female given name, equivalent to English Mary.

Related terms


Tahitian

Noun

Mere

  1. Mary

mere

mere

See also: Mere, mère, merë, -mere, and mere-

English

Alternative forms

Noun

mere (plural meres)

  1. (obsolete) the sea
    • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
      I see that it is good; now make we man to our likeness, that shall be keeper of mere & leas(ow), of fowls and fish in flood.
  2. (dialectal or literary) A pool; a small, shallow lake or pond; marsh
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Drayton to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tennyson to this entry?)
    • 1955, William Golding, The Inheritors, Faber & Faber 2005, p. 194:
      Lok got to his feet and wandered along by the marshes towards the mere where Fa had disappeared.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English mere, from Old English mǣre (boundary; limit), from Proto-Germanic *mēriją (boundary), from Proto-Indo-European *mey- (to fence). Cognate with Dutch meer (a limit, boundary), Icelandic mærr (borderland), Swedish landamäre (border, borderline, boundary).

Alternative forms

Noun

mere (plural meres)

  1. boundary, limit; a boundary-marker; boundary-line
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ix:
      The Troian Brute did first that Citie found, / And Hygate made the meare thereof by West, / And Ouert gate by North: that is the bound / Toward the land; two riuers bound the rest.

Verb

mere (third-person singular simple present meres, present participle mering, simple past and past participle mered)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To limit; bound; divide or cause division in.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To set divisions and bounds.
  3. (cartography) To decide upon the position of a boundary; to position it on a map.
    • 2016 April 1, David EM Andrews, “Merely a question of boundaries.”, in Sheetlines, The Charles Close Society, ISSN 0962-8207:
      What chance is there of revising this example of case law to include an exception to the generally cited rule when an administrative boundary has been mered in the past to coincide with a private property boundary?
Related terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English, from Old English mǣre (famous, great, excellent, sublime, splendid, pure, sterling), from Proto-Germanic *mērijaz (excellent, famous), from Proto-Indo-European *mēros (large, handsome). Cognate with Middle High German mære (famous), Icelandic mærr (famous).

Alternative forms

Adjective

mere (comparative more mere, superlative most mere)

  1. (obsolete) famous.

Etymology 4

From Anglo-Norman meer, from Old French mier, from Latin merus. Perhaps influenced by Old English mǣre (famous, great, excellent, sublime, splendid, pure, sterling), or conflated with Etymology 3.

Adjective

mere (comparative merer, superlative merest)

  1. (obsolete) Pure, unalloyed [8th-17thc.].
  2. (obsolete) Nothing less than; complete, downright [15th-18thc.].
    I saved a mere 10 pounds this week.
  3. Just, only; no more than [from 16thc.], pure and simple, neither more nor better than might be expected.
    • 1915, Mrs. Belloc Lowndes, The Lodger, chapter I:
      Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; [].
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Internal Combustion:
      More than a mere source of Promethean sustenance to thwart the cold and cook one's meat, wood was quite simply mankind's first industrial and manufacturing fuel.
    • 2012 March 1, Brian Hayes, Pixels or Perish”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 106:
      Drawings and pictures are more than mere ornaments in scientific discourse. Blackboard sketches, geological maps, diagrams of molecular structure, astronomical photographs, MRI images, the many varieties of statistical charts and graphs: These pictorial devices are indispensable tools for presenting evidence, for explaining a theory, for telling a story.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 5

Borrowing from Maori mere (more).

Noun

mere (plural meres)

  1. a Maori war-club

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: condition · sleep · ex · #688: mere · agreement · ship · third

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Noun

mere

  1. plural of meer

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse meiri (more), from Proto-Germanic *maizô.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /meːrə/, [ˈmeːɐ]

Adjective

mere

  1. more; to a higher degree
    Han er mere højtidelig end jeg er.
    He is more solemn than I am.
  2. more; in greater quantity
    I har mere plads end jeg har.
    You have more space than I do.

Usage notes

"Mere", in the second sense, is only used with uncountable nouns. For countable nouns, use flere.


Estonian

Noun

mere

  1. Genitive singular form of meri.

Italian

Adjective

mere f

  1. feminine plural of mero

Anagrams


Latin

Verb

merē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of mereō

References


Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch mēro, from Proto-Germanic *maizô.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /meːrə/

Adjective

mêre (superlative meest)

  1. greater, larger
  2. older

Antonyms

Determiner

mêre (superlative meest)

  1. more

Antonyms

Adverb

mêre (superlative meest)

  1. more, to a greater degree

Synonyms

Antonyms

Descendants


Middle French

Etymology

From Old French mere medre, from Latin mater, matrem.

Noun

mere f (plural meres)

  1. mother (female family member)
Descendants

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea). Cognate with Old Frisian mere (West Frisian mar), Old Saxon meri (Low German Meer, meer), Dutch meer, Old High German meri (German Meer), Old Norse marr (Swedish mar). The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin mare, Old Irish muir (Breton mor), Old Church Slavonic море (Russian море), Lithuanian mãre.

Pronunciation

Declension

Descendants


Old French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From earlier medre, from Latin mater, matrem.

Noun

mere f (oblique plural meres, nominative singular mere, nominative plural meres)

  1. mother (female family member)
Descendants

Romanian

Noun

mere n pl

  1. plural of măr