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Webster 1913 Edition


Ship

Ship

,
Noun.
[AS.
scipe
.]
Pay; reward.
[Obs.]
In withholding or abridging of the
ship
or the hire or the wages of servants.
Chaucer.

Ship

,
Noun.
[OE.
ship
,
schip
, AS.
scip
; akin to OFries.
skip
, OS.
scip
, D.
schip
, G.
schiff
, OHG.
scif
, Dan.
skib
, Sw.
skeep
, Icel. & Goth.
skip
; of unknown origin. Cf.
Equip
,
Skiff
,
Skipper
.]
1.
Any large seagoing vessel.
Like a stately
ship
. . .
With all her bravery on, and tackle trim,
Sails filled, and streamers waving.
Milton.
Thou, too, sail on, O
Ship
of State!
Longfellow.
2.
Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix.
l Port or Larboard Side;
s
Starboard Side; 1 Roundhouse or Deck House; 2 Tiller; 3 Grating; 4 Wheel; 5 Wheel Chains; 6 Binnacle; 7 Mizzenmast; 8 Skylight; 9 Capstan; 10 Mainmast; 11 Pumps; 12 Galley or Caboose; 13 Main Hatchway; 14 Windlass; 15 Foremast; 16 Fore Hatchway; 17 Bitts; 18 Bowsprit; 19 Head Rail; 20 Boomkins; 21 Catheads on Port Bow and Starboard Bow; 22 Fore Chains; 23 Main Chains; 24 Mizzen Chains; 25 Stern.
1 Fore Royal Stay; 2 Flying Jib Stay; 3 Fore Topgallant Stay;4 Jib Stay; 5 Fore Topmast Stays; 6 Fore Tacks; 8 Flying Martingale; 9 Martingale Stay, shackled to Dolphin Striker; 10 Jib Guys; 11 Jumper Guys; 12 Back Ropes; 13 Robstays; 14 Flying Jib Boom; 15 Flying Jib Footropes; 16 Jib Boom; 17 Jib Foottropes; 18 Bowsprit; 19 Fore Truck; 20 Fore Royal Mast; 21 Fore Royal Lift; 22 Fore Royal Yard; 23 Fore Royal Backstays; 24 Fore Royal Braces; 25 Fore Topgallant Mast and Rigging; 26 Fore Topgallant Lift; 27 Fore Topgallant Yard; 28 Fore Topgallant Backstays; 29 Fore Topgallant Braces; 30 Fore Topmast and Rigging; 31 Fore Topsail Lift; 32 Fore Topsail Yard; 33 Fore Topsail Footropes; 34 Fore Topsail Braces; 35 Fore Yard; 36 Fore Brace; 37 Fore Lift; 38 Fore Gaff; 39 Fore Trysail Vangs; 40 Fore Topmast Studding-sail Boom; 41 Foremast and Rigging; 42 Fore Topmast Backstays; 43 Fore Sheets; 44 Main Truck and Pennant; 45 Main Royal Mast and Backstay; 46 Main Royal Stay; 47 Main Royal Lift; 48 Main Royal Yard; 49 Main Royal Braces; 50 Main Topgallant Mast and Rigging; 51 Main Topgallant Lift; 52 Main Topgallant Backstays; 53 Main Topgallant Yard; 54 Main Topgallant Stay; 55 Main Topgallant Braces; 56 Main Topmast and Rigging; 57 Topsail Lift; 58 Topsail Yard; 59 Topsail Footropes; 60 Topsail Braces; 61 Topmast Stays; 62 Main Topgallant Studding-sail Boom; 63 Main Topmast Backstay; 64 Main Yard; 65 Main Footropes; 66 Mainmast and Rigging; 67 Main Lift; 68 Main Braces; 69 Main Tacks; 70 Main Sheets; 71 Main Trysail Gaff; 72 Main Trysail Vangs; 73 Main Stays; 74 Mizzen Truck; 75 Mizzen Royal Mast and Rigging; 76 Mizzen Royal Stay; 77 Mizzen Royal Lift; 78 Mizzen Royal Yard; 79 Mizzen Royal Braces; 80 Mizzen Topgallant Mast and Rigging; 81 Mizzen Topgallant Lift; 82 Mizzen Topgallant Backstays; 83 Mizzen Topgallant Braces; 84 Mizzen Topgallant Yard; 85 Mizzen Topgallant Stay; 86 Mizzen Topmast and Rigging; 87 Mizzen Topmast Stay; 88 Mizzen Topsail Lift; 89 Mizzen Topmast Backstays; 90 Mizzen Topsail Braces; 91 Mizzen Topsail Yard; 92 Mizzen Topsail Footropes; 93 Crossjack Yard; 94 Crossjack Footropes; 95 Crossjack Lift; 96 Crossjack Braces; 97 Mizzenmast and Rigging; 98 Mizzen Stay; 99 Spanker Gaff; 100 Peak Halyards; 101 Spanker Vangs; 102 Spanker Boom; 103 Spanker Boom Topping Lift; 104 Jacob’s Ladder, or Stern Ladder; 105 Spanker Sheet; 106 Cutwater; 107 Starboard Bow; 108 Starboard Beam; 109 Water Line; 110 Starboard Quarter; 111 Rudder.
3.
A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.
[Obs.]
Tyndale.
Armed ship
,
a private ship taken into the service of the government in time of war, and armed and equipped like a ship of war.
[Eng.]
Brande & C.
General ship
.
See under
General
.
Ship biscuit
,
hard biscuit prepared for use on shipboard; – called also
ship bread
. See
Hardtack
.
Ship boy
,
a boy who serves in a ship.
“Seal up the ship boy's eyes.”
Shak.
Ship breaker
,
one who breaks up vessels when unfit for further use.
Ship broker
,
a mercantile agent employed in buying and selling ships, procuring cargoes, etc., and generally in transacting the business of a ship or ships when in port.
Ship canal
,
a canal suitable for the passage of seagoing vessels.
Ship carpenter
,
a carpenter who works at shipbuilding; a shipwright.
Ship chandler
,
one who deals in cordage, canvas, and other, furniture of vessels.
Ship chandlery
,
the commodities in which a ship chandler deals; also, the business of a ship chandler.
Ship fever
(Med.)
,
a form of typhus fever; – called also
putrid fever
,
jail fever
, or
hospital fever
.
Ship joiner
,
a joiner who works upon ships.
Ship letter
,
a letter conveyed by a ship not a mail packet.
Ship money
(Eng. Hist.)
,
an imposition formerly charged on the ports, towns, cities, boroughs, and counties, of England, for providing and furnishing certain ships for the king's service. The attempt made by
Charles I.
to revive and enforce this tax was resisted by
John Hampden
, and was one of the causes which led to the death of
Charles
. It was finally abolished.
Ship of the line
.
See under
Line
.
Ship pendulum
,
a pendulum hung amidships to show the extent of the rolling and pitching of a vessel.
Ship railway
.
(a)
An inclined railway with a cradelike car, by means of which a ship may be drawn out of water, as for repairs
.
(b)
A railway arranged for the transportation of vessels overland between two water courses or harbors.
Ship's company
,
the crew of a ship or other vessel.
Ship's days
,
the days allowed a vessel for loading or unloading.
Ship's husband
.
See under
Husband
.
Ship's papers
(Mar. Law)
,
papers with which a vessel is required by law to be provided, and the production of which may be required on certain occasions. Among these papers are the register, passport or sea letter, charter party, bills of lading, invoice, log book, muster roll, bill of health, etc.
Bouvier.
Kent.
To make ship
,
to embark in a ship or other vessel.

Ship

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Shipped
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Shipping
.]
1.
To put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water.
The timber was . . .
shipped
in the bay of Attalia, from whence it was by sea transported to Pelusium.
Knolles.
2.
By extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance;
as, to
ship
freight by railroad
.
3.
Hence, to send away; to get rid of.
[Colloq.]
4.
To engage or secure for service on board of a ship;
as, to
ship
seamen
.
5.
To receive on board ship;
as, to
ship
a sea
.
6.
To put in its place;
as, to
ship
the tiller or rudder
.

Ship

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To engage to serve on board of a vessel;
as, to
ship
on a man-of-war
.
2.
To embark on a ship.
Wyclif (Acts xxviii. 11)

Webster 1828 Edition


Ship

SHIP

, as a termination, denotes state or office; as in lordship.

SHIP

. [See Shape.]

SHIP

,
Noun.
[L. scapha; from the root of shape.] In a general sense, a vessel or building of a peculiar structure, adapted to navigation, or floating on water by means of sails. In an appropriate sense, a building of a structure or form fitted for navigation, furnished with a bowsprit and three masts, a main-mast, a fore-mast and a mizen-mast, each of which is composed a lower-mast, a top-mast and top-gallant-mast, and square rigged. Ships are of various sizes and are for various uses; most of them however fall under the denomination of ships of war and merchant's ships.

SHIP

,
Verb.
T.
1. To put on board of a ship or vessel of any kind; as, to ship goods at Liverpoll for New York.
2. To transport in a ship; to convey by water.
The sun shall no sooner the mountains touch,
But we will ship him hence. Shak.
3. To receive into a ship or vessel; as, to ship at sea.

Definition 2021


ship

ship

See also: -ship

English

Alternative forms

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: shĭp, IPA(key): /ʃɪp/
  • Rhymes: -ɪp

Noun

ship (plural ships)

A ship (senses 1 and 3).
  1. A water-borne vessel generally larger than a boat.
  2. (chiefly in combination) A vessel which travels through any medium other than across land, such as an airship or spaceship.
  3. (archaic, nautical, formal) A sailing vessel with three or more square-rigged masts.
  4. A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tyndale to this entry?)
Usage notes
  • The singular form ship is sometimes used without any article, producing such sentences as "In all, we spent three weeks aboard ship." and "Abandon ship!". (Similar patterns may be seen with many place nouns, such as camp, home, work, and school, but the details vary between them.)
  • Ships are traditionally regarded as feminine and the pronouns her and she are normally used instead of it.
Hyponyms
  • Wikisaurus:watercraft
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Verb

ship (third-person singular simple present ships, present participle shipping, simple past and past participle shipped)

  1. (transitive) To send by water-borne transport.
    • Richard Knolles (1545-1610)
      The timber was [] shipped in the bay of Attalia, from whence it was by sea transported to Pelusium.
    • 2014 June 14, It's a gas”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8891:
      One of the hidden glories of Victorian engineering is proper drains. Isolating a city’s effluent and shipping it away in underground sewers has probably saved more lives than any medical procedure except vaccination.
  2. (transitive) To send (a parcel or container) to a recipient (by any means of transport).
    to ship freight by railroad
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To release a product to vendors; to launch.
    Our next issue ships early next year.
    The developers had to ship the game two weeks late.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To engage to serve on board a vessel.
    to ship seamen; I shipped on a man-of-war.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, chapter 19
      With finger pointed and eye levelled at the Pequod, the beggar-like stranger stood a moment, as if in a troubled reverie; then starting a little, turned and said:—“Ye’ve shipped, have ye? Names down on the papers? Well, well, what’s signed, is signed; and what’s to be, will be; []
  5. (intransitive) To embark on a ship.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wyclif (Acts xxviii. 11) to this entry?)
  6. (transitive, nautical) To put in its place.
    to ship the tiller or rudder
  7. (transitive) To take in (water) over the sides of a vessel.
    We were shipping so much water I was sure we would capsize.
  8. (transitive) To pass (from one person to another).
    Can you ship me the ketchup?
    • 2011 September 18, Ben Dirs, Rugby World Cup 2011: England 41-10 Georgia”, in BBC Sport:
      And when scrum-half Ben Youngs, who had a poor game, was burgled by opposite number Irakli Abuseridze and the ball shipped down the line to Irakli Machkhaneli, it looked like Georgia had scored a try of their own, but the winger's foot was in touch.
  9. (poker slang, transitive, intransitive) To go all in.
  10. (sports) To trade or send a player to another team.
    Twins ship Delmon Young to Tigers.
  11. (rugby) To bungle a kick and give the opposing team possession.
    • 2011 October 1, Tom Fordyce, Rugby World Cup 2011: England 16-12 Scotland”, in BBC Sport:
      England were shipping penalties at an alarming rate - five in the first 15 minutes alone - and with Wilkinson missing three long-distance pots of his own in the first 20 minutes, the alarm bells began to ring for Martin Johnson's men.
    • 2015 February 11, “Six Nations: Scotland raw but capable of improving”, in The Scotsman:
      They shipped penalties, lost field position, and in the second-half, having retreated to the changing room buoyed by Dougie Fife’s well-worked try, found themselves ceding two-thirds of the territory and with it, the lion’s share of the ball.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From relationship.

Noun

ship (plural ships)

  1. (fandom slang) A fictional romantic relationship between two characters, either real or themselves fictional.

Verb

ship (third-person singular simple present ships, present participle shipping, simple past and past participle shipped)

  1. (fandom slang) To support or approve of a fictional romantic relationship between two characters, either real or themselves fictional.
    I ship Kirk and Spock in Star Trek.
    I ship Peggy and Angie in "Marvel's Agent Carter".
Derived terms
See also

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: ex · mere · agreement · #690: ship · third · evil · outside

Anagrams