Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


School

School

,
Noun.
[For
shoal
a crowd; prob. confused with
school
for learning.]
A shoal; a multitude;
as, a
school
of fish
.

School

,
Noun.
[OE.
scole
, AS.
sc[GREEK]lu
, L.
schola
, Gr. [GREEK] leisure, that in which leisure is employed, disputation, lecture, a school, probably from the same root as [GREEK], the original sense being perhaps, a stopping, a resting. See
Scheme
.]
1.
A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training;
as, the
school
of the prophets
.
Disputing daily in the
school
of one Tyrannus.
Acts xix. 9.
2.
A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children;
as, a primary
school
; a common
school
; a grammar
school
.
As he sat in the
school
at his primer.
Chaucer.
3.
A session of an institution of instruction.
How now, Sir Hugh! No
school
to-day?
Shakespeare
4.
One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning.
At Cambridge the philosophy of Descartes was still dominant in the
schools
.
Macaulay.
5.
The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honors are held.
6.
An assemblage of scholars; those who attend upon instruction in a school of any kind; a body of pupils.
What is the great community of Christians, but one of the innumerable
schools
in the vast plan which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences?
Buckminster.
7.
The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc.
Let no man be less confident in his faith . . . by reason of any difference in the several
schools
of Christians.
Jer. Taylor.
8.
The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age;
as, he was a gentleman of the old
school
.
His face pale but striking, though not handsome after the
schools
.
A. S. Hardy.
9.
Figuratively, any means of knowledge or discipline;
as, the
school
of experience
.
Boarding school
,
Common school
,
District school
,
Normal school
,
etc. See under
Boarding
,
Common
,
District
, etc.
High school
,
a free public school nearest the rank of a college.
[U. S.]
School board
,
a corporation established by law in every borough or parish in England, and elected by the burgesses or ratepayers, with the duty of providing public school accommodation for all children in their district.
School committee
,
School board
,
an elected committee of citizens having charge and care of the public schools in any district, town, or city, and responsible for control of the money appropriated for school purposes.
[U. S.]
School days
,
the period in which youth are sent to school.
School district
,
a division of a town or city for establishing and conducting schools.
[U.S.]
Sunday school
, or
Sabbath school
,
a school held on Sunday for study of the Bible and for religious instruction; the pupils, or the teachers and pupils, of such a school, collectively.

School

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Schooled
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Schooling
.]
1.
To train in an institution of learning; to educate at a school; to teach.
He’s gentle, never
schooled
, and yet learned.
Shakespeare
2.
To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic discipline; to train.
It now remains for you to
school
your child,
And ask why God's Anointed be reviled.
Dryden.
The mother, while loving her child with the intensity of a sole affection, had
schooled
herself to hope for little other return than the waywardness of an April breeze.
Hawthorne.

Webster 1828 Edition


School

SCHOOL

,
Noun.
[L. schola; Gr. leisure, vacation from business, lucubration at leisure, a place where leisure is enjoyed, a school. The adverb signifies at ease, leisurely, slowly, hardly, with labor or difficulty. I think, must have been derived from the Latin. This word seems originally to have denoted leisure, freedom from business, a time given to sports, games or exercises, and afterwards time given to literary studies. the sense of a crowd, collection or shoal, seems to be derivative.]
1.
A place or house in which persons are instructed in arts, science, languages or any species of learning; or the pupils assembled for instruction. In American usage, school more generally denotes the collective body of pupils in any place of instruction, and under the direction and discipline of one or more teachers. Thus we say, a school consists of fifty pupils. The preceptor has a large school, or a small school. His discipline keeps the school well regulated and quiet.
2.
The instruction or exercises of a collection of pupils or students, or the collective body of pupils while engaged in their studies. Thus we say, the school begins or opens at eight o'clock, that is, the pupils at that hour begin their studies. so we say, the teacher is now in school, the school hours are from nine to twelve, and from two to five.
3.
The state of instruction.
Set him betimes to school.
4.
A place of education, or collection of pupils, of any kind; as the schools of the prophets. In modern usage, the word school comprehends every place of education, as university, college, academy, common or primary schools, dancing schools, riding schools, &c.; but ordinarily the word is applied to seminaries inferior to universities and colleges.
What is the great community of christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan, which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences?
5.
Separate denomination or sect; or a system of doctrine taught by particular teachers, or peculiar to any denomination of christians or philosophers.
Let no man be less confident in his faith - by reason of any difference in the several schools of christians -
Thus we say, the Socratic school, the Platonic school, the Peripatetic or Ionic school; by which we understand all those who adopted and adhered to a particular system of opinions.
6.
The seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics and theology, which were formed in the middle ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning; or the learned men who were engaged in discussing nice points in metaphysics or theology.
The supreme authority of Aristotle in the schools of theology as well as of philosophy -
Hence, school divinity is the divinity which discusses nice points, and proves every thing by argument.
7.
Any place of improvement or learning. The world is an excellent school to wise men, but a school of vice to fools.

SCHOOL

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To instruct; to train; to educate.
He's gentle, never school'd, yet learn'd.
2.
To teach with superiority; to tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove.
School your child, and ask why God's anointed he revil'd.

Definition 2021


School

School

See also: school

German Low German

Noun

School f (plural Scholen)

  1. school (a place of learning)

school

school

See also: School

English

Alternative forms

Noun

school (1) of fish.

school (plural schools)

  1. (collective) A group of fish or a group of marine mammals such as porpoises, dolphins, or whales.
    The divers encountered a huge school of mackerel.
  2. A multitude.
Synonyms
Translations

Verb

school (third-person singular simple present schools, present participle schooling, simple past and past participle schooled)

  1. (intransitive) (of fish) To form into, or travel in a school.

Etymology 2

Elementary school

From Middle English scole, from Old English scōl (place of education), possibly from Proto-Germanic *skōla (school), from Late Latin schola, scola (learned discussion or dissertation, lecture, school), from Ancient Greek σχολεῖον (skholeîon), from σχολή (skholḗ, spare time, leisure", later, "conversations and the knowledge gained through them during free time; the places where these conversations took place), from Proto-Indo-European *seǵhe-, *sǵhē- (to hold, have, possess). Compare Old Frisian skūle, schūle (West Frisian skoalle, Saterland Frisian Skoule, school), Dutch school (school), German Low German School (school), Old High German scuola (school), Old Norse skōli (school). Influenced in some senses by Middle English schole (group of persons, host, company), from Middle Dutch scole (multitude, troop, band). See school1. Related also to Old High German sigi (German Sieg, victory), Old English siġe, sigor (victory).

Noun

school (plural schools)

  1. (US, Canada) An institution dedicated to teaching and learning; an educational institution.
    Our children attend a public school in our neighborhood.
    Harvard University is a famous American postsecondary school.
  2. (Britain) An educational institution providing primary and secondary education, prior to tertiary education (college or university).
    • 2013 July 19, Mark Tran, Denied an education by war”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 1:
      One particularly damaging, but often ignored, effect of conflict on education is the proliferation of attacks on schools [] as children, teachers or school buildings become the targets of attacks. Parents fear sending their children to school. Girls are particularly vulnerable to sexual violence.
  3. (Britain) At Eton College, a period or session of teaching.
    Divinity, history and geography are studied for two schools per week.
  4. Within a larger educational institution, an organizational unit, such as a department or institute, which is dedicated to a specific subject area.
    We are enrolled in the same university, but I attend the School of Economics and my brother is in the School of Music.
  5. (considered collectively) The followers of a particular doctrine; a particular way of thinking or particular doctrine; a school of thought.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 3, in The China Governess:
      Here the stripped panelling was warmly gold and the pictures, mostly of the English school, were mellow and gentle in the afternoon light.
    These economists belong to the monetarist school.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      Let no man be less confident in his faith [] by reason of any difference in the several schools of Christians.
  6. The time during which classes are attended or in session in an educational institution.
    I'll see you after school.
  7. The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honours are held.
  8. The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age.
    He was a gentleman of the old school.
    • A. S. Hardy
      His face pale but striking, though not handsome after the schools.
  9. An establishment offering specialized instruction, as for driving, cooking, typing, coding, etc.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
  • See also Wikisaurus:school
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

school (third-person singular simple present schools, present participle schooling, simple past and past participle schooled)

  1. (transitive) To educate, teach, or train (often, but not necessarily, in a school.)
    Many future prime ministers were schooled in Eton.
  2. (transitive) To defeat emphatically, to teach an opponent a harsh lesson.
    • 1998, Leigh Jones, "National bar exam methods win in ADA regulation test," The Journal Record, April 13,
      A blind law graduate who put the National Conference of Bar Examiners to the test got schooled in federal court.
    • 2006, Steve Smith, Forever Red: Confessions Of A Cornhusker Football Fan, page 67:
      Two weeks later, the Cornhuskers put on their road whites again and promptly got schooled by miserable Iowa State in Ames. After the shocking loss []
    • 2007, Peter David and Alvin Sargent, Spider-Man 3, Simon and Schuster, ISBN 1416527214, pg. 216,
      "You again?" Sandman demanded. "I guess you didn't learn your lesson."
      "This time I'm gonna school you."
  3. (transitive) To control, or compose, one's expression.
    She took care to school her expression, not giving away any of her feelings.
Derived terms
Translations

See also

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: trying · states · wished · #749: school · language · court · British

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sxoːl/
  • Rhymes: -oːl

Etymology 1

Noun

school f (plural scholen, diminutive schooltje n)

  1. school (An educational institution that focuses completely on education, and not on, say, research)
Derived terms
See also
  • college "lecture for students"
  • academie "universities (universiteiten), university of applied sciences (hogescholen) and art schools (kunstacademies)"
  • universiteit "an institution of research and higher education"
  • instituut "institute, including schools and universities, but also non-educational organisations"

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch scole (multitude, troop of people, swarm of animals), from Proto-Germanic *skulō (crowd), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kʷel- (crowd, people). Cognate with Middle Low German schōle (multitude, troop), Old English scolu (troop or band of people, host, multitude, school of fish).

Noun

school f (plural scholen, diminutive schooltje n)

  1. a group of fish

Etymology 3

Verb

school

  1. singular past indicative of schuilen
  2. first-person singular present indicative of scholen
  3. imperative of scholen