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Webster 1913 Edition


Vessel

Ves′sel

,
Noun.
[OF.
vessel
,
veissel
,
vaissel
,
vaissiel
, F.
vaisseau
, fr. L.
vascellum
, dim. of
vasculum
, dim. of
vas
a vessel. Cf.
Vascular
,
Vase
.]
1.
A hollow or concave utensil for holding anything; a hollow receptacle of any kind, as a hogshead, a barrel, a firkin, a bottle, a kettle, a cup, a bowl, etc.
[They drank] out of these noble
vessels
.
Chaucer.
2.
A general name for any hollow structure made to float upon the water for purposes of navigation; especially, one that is larger than a common rowboat;
as, a war
vessel
; a passenger
vessel
.
[He] began to build a
vessel
of huge bulk.
Milton.
3.
Fig.: A person regarded as receiving or containing something; esp.
(Script.)
, one into whom something is conceived as poured, or in whom something is stored for use;
as,
vessels
of wrath or mercy
.
He is a chosen
vessel
unto me.
Acts ix. 15.
[The serpent] fit
vessel
, fittest imp of fraud, in whom
To enter.
Milton.
4.
(Anat.)
Any tube or canal in which the blood or other fluids are contained, secreted, or circulated, as the arteries, veins, lymphatics, etc.
5.
(Bot.)
A continuous tube formed from superposed large cylindrical or prismatic cells (tracheae), which have lost their intervening partitions, and are usually marked with dots, pits, rings, or spirals by internal deposition of secondary membranes; a duct.
Acoustic vessels
.
See under
Acoustic
.
Weaker vessel
,
a woman; – now applied humorously.
“Giving honor unto the wife, as unto the weaker vessel.”
1 Peter iii. 7.
“You are the weaker vessel.”
Shak.

Ves′sel

,
Verb.
T.
To put into a vessel.
[Obs.]
Bacon.

Webster 1828 Edition


Vessel

VES'SEL

,
Noun.
[L. vas, vasis. This word is probably the English vat.]
1.
A cask or utensil proper for holding liquors and other things, as a tun, a pipe, a puncheon, a hogshead, a barrel, a firkin, a bottle, a kettle, a cup, a dish, &c.
2.
In anatomy, any tube or canal, in which the blood and other humors are contained, secreted or circulated, as the arteries, veins, lymphatics, spermatics, &c.
3.
In the physiology of plants, a canal or tube of very small bore, in which the sap is contained and conveyed; also, a bag or utricle, filled with pulp, and serving as a reservoir for sap; also, a spiral canal, usually of a larger bore, for receiving and distributing air.
4.
Any building used in navigation, which carries masts and sails, from the largest ship of war down to a fishing sloop. In general however, vessel is used for the smaller ships, brigs, sloops, schooners, luggers, scows, &c.
5.
Something containing.
Vessels of wrath, in Scripture, are such persons as are to receive the full effects of God's wrath and indignation, as a punishment for their sins.
Vessels of mercy, are persons who are to receive the effects of God's mercy, or future happiness and glory.
Chosen vessels, ministers of the gospel, as appointed to bear the glad news of salvation to others; called also earthen vessels, on account of their weakness and frailty.

VES'SEL

,
Verb.
T.
To put into a vessel. [Not in use.]

Definition 2021


vessel

vessel

English

Noun

vessel (plural vessels)

  1. (nautical) Any craft designed for transportation on water, such as a ship or boat. [From c.1300]
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
      But my hope was, that if I stood along this coast till I came to that part where the English traded, I should find some of their vessels upon their usual design of trade, that would relieve and take us in.
    • 2012 March 1, William E. Carter, Merri Sue Carter, “The British Longitude Act Reconsidered”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 87:
      Conditions were horrendous aboard most British naval vessels at the time. Scurvy and other diseases ran rampant, killing more seamen each year than all other causes combined, including combat.
  2. A craft designed for transportation through air or space. [From 1915]
  3. (uncountable, obsolete or dialectal) Dishes and cutlery collectively, especially if made of precious metals. [c.1300–c.1600]
    • 1523, John Bourchier, tr. Jean Froissart, Here begynneth the first volum of sir Iohan Froyssart : of the cronycles of Englande, Fraunce, Spayne, Portyngale, Scotlande, Bretayne, Flauders: and other places adioynynge.:
      All his Vessell was of golde and siluer, pottis, basons, ewers, dysshes, flagons, barels, cuppes, and all other thyngis.
  4. A container of liquid or other substance, such as a glass, goblet, cup, bottle, bowl, or pitcher. [From c.1300]
  5. A person as a container of qualities or feelings. [From 1382]
    • Bible, Acts ix. 15
      He is a chosen vessel unto me.
    • Milton
      [The serpent] fit vessel, fittest imp of fraud, in whom to enter.
    • Dolly Parton, The Seeker lyrics:
      I am a vessel that’s empty and useless / I am a bad seed that fell by the way.
  6. (biology) A tube or canal that carries fluid in an animal or plant. [From 1398]
    Blood or lymph vessels in humans, xylem or phloem vessels in plants.

Synonyms

  • See also Wikisaurus:vessel

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

vessel (third-person singular simple present vessels, present participle vesselling, simple past and past participle vesselled)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To put into a vessel.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

References

  • “vessel” in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 1974 edition.

Anagrams