Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Order

Or′der

,
Noun.
[OE.
ordre
, F.
ordre
, fr. L.
ordo
,
ordinis
. Cf.
Ordain
,
Ordinal
.]
1.
Regular arrangement; any methodical or established succession or harmonious relation; method; system
; as:
(a)
Of material things, like the books in a library.
(b)
Of intellectual notions or ideas, like the topics of a discource.
(c)
Of periods of time or occurrences, and the like.
The side chambers were . . . thirty in
order
.
Ezek. xli. 6.
Bright-harnessed angels sit in
order
serviceable.
Milton.
Good
order
is the foundation of all good things.
Burke.
2.
Right arrangement; a normal, correct, or fit condition;
as, the house is in
order
; the machinery is out of
order
.
Locke.
3.
The customary mode of procedure; established system, as in the conduct of debates or the transaction of business; usage; custom; fashion.
Dantiel.
And, pregnant with his grander thought,
Brought the old
order
into doubt.
Emerson.
4.
Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet;
as, to preserve
order
in a community or an assembly
.
5.
That which prescribes a method of procedure; a rule or regulation made by competent authority;
as, the rules and
orders
of the senate
.
The church hath authority to establish that for an
order
at one time which at another time it may abolish.
Hooker.
6.
A command; a mandate; a precept; a direction.
Upon this new fright, an
order
was made by both houses for disarming all the papists in England.
Clarendon.
7.
Hence: A commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods; a direction, in writing, to pay money, to furnish supplies, to admit to a building, a place of entertainment, or the like;
as,
orders
for blankets are large
.
In those days were pit
orders
– beshrew the uncomfortable manager who abolished them.
Lamb.
8.
A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a group or division of men in the same social or other position; also, a distinct character, kind, or sort;
as, the higher or lower
orders
of society; talent of a high
order
.
They are in equal
order
to their several ends.
Jer. Taylor.
Various
orders
various ensigns bear.
Granville.
Which, to his
order
of mind, must have seemed little short of crime.
Hawthorne.
9.
A body of persons having some common honorary distinction or rule of obligation; esp., a body of religious persons or aggregate of convents living under a common rule;
as, the
Order
of the Bath; the Franciscan
order
.
Find a barefoot brother out,
One of our
order
, to associate me.
Shakespeare
The venerable
order
of the Knights Templars.
Sir W. Scott.
10.
An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; – often used in the plural;
as, to take
orders
, or to take
holy orders
, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry
.
11.
(Arch.)
The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing.
☞ The Greeks used three different orders, easy to distinguish, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. The Romans added the Tuscan, and changed the Doric so that it is hardly recognizable, and also used a modified Corinthian called Composite. The Renaissance writers on architecture recognized five orders as orthodox or classical, – Doric (the Roman sort), Ionic, Tuscan, Corinthian, and Composite. See Illust. of
Capital
.
12.
(Nat. Hist.)
An assemblage of genera having certain important characters in common;
as, the Carnivora and Insectivora are
orders
of Mammalia
.
☞ The Linnaean artificial orders of plants rested mainly on identity in the numer of pistils, or agreement in some one character. Natural orders are groups of genera agreeing in the fundamental plan of their flowers and fruit. A natural order is usually (in botany) equivalent to a family, and may include several tribes.
13.
(Rhet.)
The placing of words and members in a sentence in such a manner as to contribute to force and beauty or clearness of expression.
14.
(Math.)
Rank; degree;
thus, the
order
of a curve or surface is the same as the degree of its equation
.
Artificial order
or
Artificial system
.
See
Artificial classification
, under
Artificial
, and Note to def. 12 above.
Close order
(Mil.)
,
the arrangement of the ranks with a distance of about half a pace between them; with a distance of about three yards the ranks are in
open order
.
The four Orders
,
The Orders four
,
the four orders of mendicant friars. See
Friar
.
Chaucer.
General orders
(Mil.)
,
orders issued which concern the whole command, or the troops generally, in distinction from
special orders
.
Holy orders
.
(a)
(Eccl.)
The different grades of the Christian ministry; ordination to the ministry. See def. 10 above.
(b)
(R. C. Ch.)
A sacrament for the purpose of conferring a special grace on those ordained.
In order to
,
for the purpose of; to the end; as means to.


The best knowledge is that which is of greatest use
in order to
our eternal happiness.
Tillotson.


Minor orders
(R. C. Ch.)
,
orders beneath the diaconate in sacramental dignity, as acolyte, exorcist, reader, doorkeeper.
Money order
. See under
Money
. –
Natural order
.
(Bot.)
See def.
12, Note. –
Order book
.
(a)
A merchant’s book in which orders are entered.
(b)
(Mil.)
A book kept at headquarters, in which all orders are recorded for the information of officers and men.
(c)
A book in the House of Commons in which proposed orders must be entered.
[Eng.]
Order in Council
,
a royal order issued with and by the advice of the Privy Council.
[Great Britain]
Order of battle
(Mil.)
,
the particular disposition given to the troops of an army on the field of battle.
Order of the day
,
in legislative bodies, the special business appointed for a specified day.
Order of a differential equation
(Math.)
,
the greatest index of differentiation in the equation.
Sailing orders
(Naut.)
,
the final instructions given to the commander of a ship of war before a cruise.
Sealed orders
,
orders sealed, and not to be opened until a certain time, or arrival at a certain place, as after a ship is at sea.
Standing order
.
(a)
A continuing regulation for the conduct of parliamentary business.
(b)
(Mil.)
An order not subject to change by an officer temporarily in command.
To give order
,
to give command or directions.
Shak.
To take order for
,
to take charge of; to make arrangements concerning.

Whiles I
take order for
mine own affairs.
Shakespeare
Syn. – Arrangement; management. See
Direction
.

Or′der

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Ordered
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Ordering
.]
[From
Order
,
Noun.
]
1.
To put in order; to reduce to a methodical arrangement; to arrange in a series, or with reference to an end. Hence, to regulate; to dispose; to direct; to rule.
To him that
ordereth
his conversation aright.
Ps. 1. 23.
Warriors old with
ordered
spear and shield.
Milton.
2.
To give an order to; to command;
as, to
order
troops to advance
.
3.
To give an order for; to secure by an order;
as, to
order
a carriage; to
order
groceries.
4.
(Eccl.)
To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.
These
ordered
folk be especially titled to God.
Chaucer.
Persons presented to be
ordered
deacons.
Bk. of Com. Prayer.
Order arms
(Mil.)
,
the command at which a rifle is brought to a position with its butt resting on the ground; also, the position taken at such a command.

Or′der

,
Verb.
I.
To give orders; to issue commands.

Webster 1828 Edition


Order

OR'DER

,
Noun.
[L. ordo.]
1.
Regular disposition or methodical arrangement of things; a word of extensive application; as the order of troops or parade; the order of books in a library; the order of proceedings in a legislative assembly. Order is the life of business.
Good order is the foundation of all good things.
2.
Proper state; as the muskets are all in good order. When the bodily organs are in order, a person is in health; when they are out of order, he is indisposed.
3.
Adherence to the point in discussion, according to established rules of debate; as, the member is not in order, that is, he wanders from the question.
4.
Established mode of proceeding. The motion is not in order.
5.
Regularity; settled mode of operation.
This fact could not occur in the order of nature; it is against the natural order of things.
6.
Mandate; precept; command; authoritative direction. I have received an order from the commander in chief. The general gave orders to march. There is an order of council to issue letters of marque.
7.
Rule; regulation; as the rules and orders of a legislative house.
8.
Regular government or discipline. It is necessary for society that good order should be observed. The meeting was turbulent; it was impossible to keep order.
9.
Rank; class; division of men; as the order of nobles; the order of priests; the higher orders of society; men of the lowest order; order of knights; military orders, &c.
10.
A religious fraternity; as the order of Benedictines.
11.
A division of natural objects, generally intermediate between class and genus. The classes, in the Linnean artificial system, are divided into orders, which include one or more genera. Linne also arranged vegetables, in his natural system, into groups of genera, called order. In the natural system of Jussieu, orders are subdivisions of classes.
12.
Measures; care. Take some order for the safety and support of the soldiers.
Provide me soldiers whilst I take order for my own affairs.
13.
In rhetoric, the placing of words and members in a sentence in such a manner as to contribute to force and beauty of expression, or to the clear illustration of the subject.
14.
The title of certain ancient books containing the divine office and manner of its performance.
15.
In architecture, a system of several members, ornaments and proportions of columns and pilasters; or a regular arrangement of the projecting parts of a building, especially of the columns, so as to form one beautiful whole. The orders are five, the Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite. The order consists of two principal members, the column, and the entablature, each of which is composed of three principal parts. Those of the column are the base, the shaft, and the capital; those of the entablature are the architrave, the frize, and the cornice. The height of the Tuscan column is 14 modules or semidiameters of the shaft at the bottom, and that os the entablature 3 1/2. The height of the Doric order is 16 modules and that of the entablature 4; that of the Ionic is 18 modules, and that of the entablature 4 1/2, that of the Corinthian order is 20 modules, and that of the entablature 5. The height of the Composite order agrees with that of the Corinthian.
In orders, set apart for the performance divine service; ordained to the work of the gospel ministry.
In order, for the purpose; to the end; as means to an end. The best knowledge is that which is of the greatest use in order to our eternal happiness.
General orders, the commands or notices which a military commander in chief issues to the troops under his command.

OR'DER

, v.t.
1.
To regulate; to methodize; to systemize; to adjust; to subject to system in management and execution; as, to order domestic affairs with prudence.
2.
To lead; to conduct; to subject to rules or laws.
To him that ordereth his conversation aright, will I show the salvation of God. Ps. 50.
3.
to direct; to command. the general ordered his troops to advance.
4.
To manage; to treat.
How shall we order the child? Judges 13.
5.
To ordain. [Not used.]
6.
To direct; to dispose in any particular manner.
Order my steps in thy word. Ps. 119.

OR'DER

,
Verb.
I.
to give command or direction.

Definition 2021


Order

Order

See also: order

German

Noun

Order f (genitive Order, plural Ordern)

  1. (military) order, command
  2. (banking) order

order

order

See also: Order

English

Alternative forms

Noun

order (countable and uncountable, plural orders)

  1. (uncountable) Arrangement, disposition, sequence.
  2. (uncountable) The state of being well arranged.
    The house is in order; the machinery is out of order.
  3. Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet.
    to preserve order in a community or an assembly
  4. (countable) A command.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 30, in The Dust of Conflict:
      It was by his order the shattered leading company flung itself into the houses when the Sin Verguenza were met by an enfilading volley as they reeled into the calle.
  5. (countable) A request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.
    • 2012 December 1, “An internet of airborne things”, in The Economist, volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly):
      A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer.
  6. (countable) A group of religious adherents, especially monks or nuns, set apart within their religion by adherence to a particular rule or set of principles; as, the Jesuit Order.
  7. (countable) An association of knights; as, the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Bath.
  8. any group of people with common interests.
  9. (countable) A decoration, awarded by a government, a dynastic house, or a religious body to an individual, usually for distinguished service to a nation or to humanity.
  10. (countable, taxonomy) A rank in the classification of organisms, below class and above family; a taxon at that rank.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, In the News”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193:
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.
    Magnolias belong to the order Magnoliales.
  11. A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a distinct character, kind, or sort.
    the higher or lower orders of society
    talent of a high order
    • Jeremy Taylor
      They are in equal order to their several ends.
    • Granville
      Various orders various ensigns bear.
    • Hawthorne
      [] which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime.
  12. An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; often used in the plural.
    to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry
  13. (architecture) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing.
  14. (cricket) The sequence in which a side’s batsmen bat; the batting order.
  15. (electronics) a power of polynomial function in an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
    • a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter.
  16. (chemistry) The overall power of the rate law of a chemical reaction, expressed as a polynomial function of concentrations of reactants and products.
  17. (mathematics) The cardinality, or number of elements in a set or related structure.
  18. (graph theory) The number of vertices in a graph.
  19. (order theory) A partially ordered set.
  20. (order theory) The relation on a partially ordered set that determines that it in fact a partially ordered set.
  21. (mathematics) The sum of the exponents on the variables in a monomial, or the highest such among all monomials in a polynomial.

Quotations

  • 1611King James Version of the Bible, Luke 1:1
    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us...
  • Donald Knuth. The Art of Computer Programming, Volume 3: Sorting and Searching, Addison-Wesley, 1973, chapter 8:
    Since only two of our tape drives were in working order, I was ordered to order more tape units in short order, in order to order the data several orders of magnitude faster.

Antonyms

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Glossary of order theory

Verb

order (third-person singular simple present orders, present participle ordering, simple past and past participle ordered)

  1. (transitive) To set in some sort of order.
  2. (transitive) To arrange, set in proper order.
  3. (transitive) To issue a command to.
    to order troops to advance
    He ordered me to leave.
  4. (transitive) To request some product or service; to secure by placing an order.
    to order groceries
  5. To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.
    • Book of Common Prayer
      persons presented to be ordered deacons

Conjugation

Synonyms
  • (arrange into some sort of order): sort, rank

Derived terms

Translations

Related terms

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: white · means · thus · #284: order · near · public · others

Anagrams


German

Verb

order

  1. First-person singular present of ordern.
  2. Imperative singular of ordern.

Polish

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈɔr.dɛr/

Noun

order m inan

  1. order (a decoration awarded by government or other authority)

Declension

Synonyms

  • odznaczenie

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔrdɛr/

Noun

order c

  1. an order; a command
  2. an order; a request for some product or service

Declension

Related terms

  • arresteringsorder
  • dagorder
  • förhållningsorder
  • häktningsorder
  • kabinettsorder
  • kontraorder
  • köporder
  • kundorder
  • orden
  • orderbok
  • ordergivning
  • ordervägran
  • ordna
  • ordning
  • postorder
  • säljorder
  • skyddsorder
  • stallorder
  • stororder

See also