Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Exit


Ex′it

.
[L., 3d pers. sing. pres. of
exire
to go out. See
Exeunt
,
Issue
.]
He (or she ) goes out, or retires from view;
as,
exit
Macbeth
.
☞ The Latin words exit (he or she goes out), and exeunt ( they go out), are used in dramatic writings to indicate the time of withdrawal from the stage of one or more of the actors.

Ex′it

,
Noun.
[See 1st
Exit
.]
1.
The departure of a player from the stage, when he has performed his part.
They have their
exits
and their entrances.
Shakespeare
2.
Any departure; the act of quitting the stage of action or of life; death;
as, to make one’s
exit
.
Sighs for his
exit
, vulgarly called death.
Cowper.
3.
A way of departure; passage out of a place; egress; way out.

Webster 1828 Edition


Exit

EX'IT

,
Noun.
[L. the 3d person of exeo, to go out.] Literally, he goes out or departs. Hence,
1.
The departure of a player from the state, when he has performed his part. This is also a term set in a play, to mark the time of an actor's quitting the state.
2.
Any departure; the act of quitting the state of action or of life; death; decease.
3.
A way of departure; passage out of a place.
4.
A going out; departure.

Definition 2022


exit

exit

See also: èxit

English

An exit sign

Noun

exit (plural exits)

  1. A way out.
    He was looking for the exit and got lost.
  2. A passage or gate from inside someplace to the outside, outgang.
    She stood at the exit of the house looking back and waving at those inside.
  3. The action of leaving.
    He made his exit at the opportune time.
  4. Death.
    The untimely exit of a consummate politician.

Synonyms

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

exit (third-person singular simple present exits, present participle exiting, simple past and past participle exited)

  1. To go out
  2. To leave
  3. To die

Translations

See also


Latin

Etymology

From exeō (exit, go out), from ē (out) + (go).

Verb

exit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of exeō

Usage notes

Used as stage direction in plays in English.

Related terms