Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Part

Part

(pärt)
,
Noun.
[F.
part
, L.
pars
, gen.
partis
; cf.
parere
to bring forth, produce. Cf.
Parent
,
Depart
,
Parcel
,
Partner
,
Party
,
Portion
.]
1.
One of the portions, equal or unequal, into which anything is divided, or regarded as divided; something less than a
whole
; a number, quantity, mass, or the like, regarded as going to make up, with others, a larger number, quantity, mass, etc., whether actually separate or not; a piece; a fragment; a fraction; a division; a member; a constituent.
And kept back
part
of the price, . . . and brought a certain
part
and laid it at the apostles’feet.
Acts v. 2.
Our ideas of extension and number – do they not contain a secret relation of the
parts
?
Locke.
I am a
part
of all that I have met.
Tennyson.
2.
Hence, specifically:
(a)
An equal constituent portion; one of several or many like quantities, numbers, etc., into which anything is divided, or of which it is composed; proportional division or ingredient.
An homer is the tenth
part
of an ephah.
Ex. xvi. 36.
A thought which, quartered, hath but one
part
wisdom,
And ever three
parts
coward.
Shakespeare
(b)
A constituent portion of a living or spiritual whole; a member; an organ; an essential element.
All the
parts
were formed . . . into one harmonious body.
Locke.
The pulse, the glow of every
part
.
Keble.
(c)
A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; talent; – usually in the plural with a collective sense.
“Men of considerable parts.”
Burke.
“Great quickness of parts.”
Macaulay.
Which maintained so politic a state of evil, that they will not admit any good
part
to intermingle with them.
Shakespeare
(d)
Quarter; region; district; – usually in the plural.
“The uttermost part of the heaven.”
Neh. i. 9.
All
parts
resound with tumults, plaints, and fears.
Dryden.
(e)
(Math.)
Such portion of any quantity, as when taken a certain number of times, will exactly make that quantity;
as, 3 is a
part
of 12;
– the opposite of
multiple
. Also, a line or other element of a geometrical figure.
3.
That which belongs to one, or which is assumed by one, or which falls to one, in a division or apportionment; share; portion; lot; interest; concern; duty; office.
We have no
part
in David.
2 Sam. xx. 1.
Accuse not Nature! she hath done her
part
;
Do thou but thine.
Milton.
Let me bear
My
part
of danger with an equal share.
Dryden.
4.
Hence, specifically:
(a)
One of the opposing parties or sides in a conflict or a controversy; a faction.
For he that is not against us is on our
part
.
Mark ix. 40.
Make whole kingdoms take her brother's
part
.
Waller.
(b)
A particular character in a drama or a play; an assumed personification; also, the language, actions, and influence of a character or an actor in a play; or, figuratively, in real life;
as, to play the
part
of Macbeth
. See
To act a part
, under
Act
.
That
part

Was aptly fitted and naturally performed.
Shakespeare
It was a brute
part
of him to kill so capital a calf.
Shakespeare
Honor and shame from no condition rise;
Act well your
part
, there all the honor lies.
Pope.
(c)
(Mus.)
One of the different melodies of a concerted composition, which heard in union compose its harmony; also, the music for each voice or instrument;
as, the treble, tenor, or bass
part
; the violin
part
, etc.
For my part
,
so far as concerns me; for my share.
For the most part
.
See under
Most
,
Adj.
In good part
,
as well done; favorably; acceptably; in a friendly manner;
as, to take an act
in good part
.
Hooker.
In ill part
,
unfavorably; with displeasure.
In part
,
in some degree; partly.
Part and parcel
,
an essential or constituent portion; – a reduplicative phrase. Cf.
might and main
,
kith and kin
, etc.
“She was . . . part and parcel of the race and place.”
Howitt.
Part of speech
(Gram.)
,
a sort or class of words of a particular character;
thus, the noun is a
part of speech
denoting the name of a thing; the verb is a
part of speech
which asserts something of the subject of a sentence
.
Part owner
(Law)
,
one of several owners or tenants in common. See
Joint tenant
, under
Joint
.
Part singing
,
singing in which two or more of the harmonic parts are taken.
Part song
,
a song in two or more (commonly four) distinct vocal parts.
“A part song differs from a madrigal in its exclusion of contrapuntual devices; from a glee, in its being sung by many voices, instead of by one only, to each part.”
Stainer & Barrett.
Syn. – Portion; section; division; fraction; fragment; piece; share; constituent. See
Portion
, and
Section
.

Part

(pärt)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Parted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Parting
.]
[F.
partir
, L.
partire
,
partiri
, p. p.
partitus
, fr.
pars
, gen.
partis
, a part. See
Part
,
Noun.
]
1.
To divide; to separate into distinct parts; to break into two or more parts or pieces; to sever.
“Thou shalt part it in pieces.”
Lev. ii. 6.
There, [celestial love]
parted
into rainbow hues.
Keble.
2.
To divide into shares; to divide and distribute; to allot; to apportion; to share.
To
part
his throne, and share his heaven with thee.
Pope.
They
parted
my raiment among them.
John xix. 24.
3.
To separate or disunite; to cause to go apart; to remove from contact or contiguity; to sunder.
The Lord do so to me, and more also, if aught but death
part
thee and me.
Ruth i. 17.
While he blessed them, he was
parted
from them, and carried up into heaven.
Luke xxiv. 51.
The narrow seas that
part

The French and English.
Shakespeare
4.
Hence:
To hold apart; to stand between; to intervene betwixt, as combatants.
The stumbling night did
part
our weary powers.
Shakespeare
5.
To separate by a process of extraction, elimination, or secretion;
as, to
part
gold from silver
.
The liver minds his own affair, . . .
And
parts
and strains the vital juices.
Prior.
6.
To leave; to quit.
[Obs.]
Since presently your souls must
part
your bodies.
Shakespeare
To part a cable
(Naut.)
,
to break it.
To part company
,
to separate, as travelers or companions.

Part

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To be broken or divided into parts or pieces; to break; to become separated; to go asunder;
as, rope
parts
; his hair
parts
in the middle.
2.
To go away; to depart; to take leave; to quit each other; hence, to die; – often with from.
He wrung Bassanio's hand, and so they
parted
.
Shakespeare
He owned that he had
parted
from the duke only a few hours before.
Macaulay.
His precious bag, which he would by no means
part
from.
G. Eliot.
3.
To perform an act of parting; to relinquish a connection of any kind; – followed by
with
or
from
;
as, to
part
with one's money
.
Celia, for thy sake, I
part

With all that grew so near my heart.
Waller.
Powerful hands . . . will not
part

Easily from possession won with arms.
Milton.
It was strange to him that a father should feel no tenderness at
parting
with an only son.
A. Trollope.
4.
To have a part or share; to partake.
[Obs.]
“They shall part alike.”
1 Sam. xxx. 24.

Part

,
adv.
Partly; in a measure.
[R.]
Shak.

Webster 1828 Edition


Part

P`ART

,
Noun.
[L. pars, partis.]
1.
A portion, piece or fragment separated from a whole thing; as, to divide an orange into five parts.
2.
A portion or quantity of a thing not separated in fact, but considered or mentioned by itself. In what part of England is Oxford situated? So we say, the upper part or lower part, the fore part, a remote part, a small part, or a great part.
The people stood at the nether part of the mount. Ex.19.
3.
A portion of number, separated or considered by itself; as a part of the nation or congregation.
4.
A portion or component particle; as the component parts of a fossil or metal.
5.
A portion of man; as the material part or body,or the intellectual part, the soul or understanding; the perishable part; the immortal part.
6.
A member.
All the parts were formed in his mind into one harmonious body.
7.
Particular division; distinct species or sort belonging to a whole; as all the parts of domestic business or of a manufacture.
8.
Ingredient in a mingled mass; a portion in a compound.
9.
That which falls to each in division; share; as, let me bear my part of the danger.
10. Proportional quantity; as four parts of lime with three of sand.
11. Share; concern; interest.
Sheba said, we have no part in David. 2 Sam.20.
12. Side; party; interest; faction.
And make whole kingdoms take her brother's part.
13. Something relating or belonging to; that which concerns; as for your part; for his part; for her part.
For my part, I have no servile end in my labor.
14. Share of labor, action or influence; particular office or business.
Accuse not nature, she hath done her part,
Do thou but thine.
15. Character appropriated in a play. The parts of the comedy were judiciously cast and admirable performed.
16. Action; conduct.
17. In mathematics, such a portion of any quantity, as when taken a certain number of times, will exactly make that quantity. Thus 3 is a part of 12. It is the opposite of multiple.
Parts, in the plural, qualities; powers; faculties; accomplishments.
Such licentious parts tend for the most part to the hurt of the English--
Parts, applied to place, signifies quarters, regions, districts.
When he had gone over those parts, and had given them much exhortation, he came into Greece. Acts.20.
All parts resound with tumults, plaints and fears.
In general, parts is used for excellent or superior endowments, or more than ordinary talents. This is what we understand by the phrase, a man of parts.
In good part, as well done; favorably; acceptably; in a friendly manner; not in displeasure.
God accepteth it in good part at the hands of faithful man.ill part, as ill done; unfavorably; with displeasure.
For the most part, commonly; oftener than otherwise.
In part, in some degree or extent; partly.
Logical part, among schoolmen, a division of some universal as its whole; in which sense, species are parts of a genus, and individuals are parts of a species.
Physical parts, are of two kinds,homogeneous and heterogeneous; the first is of the same denomination; the second of different ones.
Aliquot part, is a quantity which being repeated any number of times, becomes equal to an integer. Thus 6 is an aliquot part of 24.
Aliquant part, is a quantity which being repeated any number of times, becomes greater or less than the whole, as 5 is an aliquant part of 17.
Part of speech, in grammar, a sort or class of words of a particular character. Thus the noun is part of speech, denoting the names of things, or those vocal sounds which usage has attached to things. The verb is a part of speech expressing motion, action or being.

P`ART

,
Verb.
T.
[L. partio.]
1.
To divide, separate or break; to sever into two or more pieces.
2.
To divide into shares; to distribute. Acts.2.
3.
To separate or disunite, as things which are near each other. Ruth 1.
4.
To keep asunder; to separate. A narrow sea parts England from France.
5.
To separate, as combatants. Night parted the armies.
6.
To secern; to secrete.
The liver minds his own affair,
And parts and strains the vital juices.
7.
In seamen's language, to break; as, the ship parted her cables.
8.
To separate metals.

P`ART

,
Verb.
I.
To be separated, removed or detached.
Powerful hands will not part
Easily from possession won with arms.
1.
To quit each other.
He wrung Bassanio's hand, and so they parted.
2.
To take or bid farewell.
3.
To have a share.
They shall part alike. 1 Sam.30.
4.
To go away; to depart.
Thy father
Embraced me, parting for th' Etrurian land.
5.
To break; to be torn asunder. The cable parted.part with, to quit; to resign; to lose; to be separated from; as, to part with near friends.
Celia, for thy sake I part
With all that grew so near my heart.

Definition 2021


part

part

See also: párt, pârț, and part.

English

Noun

part (plural parts)

  1. (heading) A portion; a component.
    1. A fraction of a whole. syn. transl.
      Gaul is divided into three parts.
      • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page vii
        Hepaticology, outside the temperate parts of the Northern Hemisphere, still lies deep in the shadow cast by that ultimate "closet taxonomist," Franz Stephani—a ghost whose shadow falls over us all.
      • 2013 June 1, Towards the end of poverty”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 11:
        America’s poverty line is $63 a day for a family of four. In the richer parts of the emerging world $4 a day is the poverty barrier. But poverty’s scourge is fiercest below $1.25 ([]): people below that level live lives that are poor, nasty, brutish and short.
    2. A distinct element of something larger.
      The parts of a chainsaw include the chain, engine, and handle.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 8, in The Celebrity:
        It had been arranged as part of the day's programme that Mr. Cooke was to drive those who wished to go over the Rise in his new brake.
      • 2012 December 1, An internet of airborne things”, in The Economist, volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly):
        A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.
    3. A group inside a larger group. syn. transl.
    4. Share, especially of a profit.
      I want my part of the bounty.
    5. A unit of relative proportion in a mixture.
      The mixture comprises one part sodium hydroxide and ten parts water.
    6. 3.5 centiliters of one ingredient in a mixed drink.
    7. A section of a document.
      Please turn to Part I, Chapter 2.
    8. A section of land; an area of a country or other territory; region.
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vi:
        the Faery knight / Besought that Damzell suffer him depart, / And yield him readie passage to that other part.
    9. (mathematics, dated) A factor.
      3 is a part of 12.
    10. (US) A room in a public building, especially a courtroom.
  2. Duty; responsibility.
    to do one’s part
    1. Position or role (especially in a play).
      We all have a part to play.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
        We drove back to the office with some concern on my part at the prospect of so large a case. Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 5, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
        He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights, [], the height and vastness of this noble fane, its antiquity and its strength—all these things seemed to have their part as causes of the thrilling emotion that accompanied his thoughts.
    2. (music) The melody played or sung by a particular instrument, voice, or group of instruments or voices, within a polyphonic piece.
      The first violin part in this concerto is very challenging.
    3. Each of two contrasting sides of an argument, debate etc.; "hand".
      • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essayes, London: Edward Blount, OCLC 946730821, II.15:
        the fruition of life cannot perfectly be pleasing unto us, if we stand in any feare to lose it. A man might nevertheless say on the contrary part, that we embrace and claspe this good so much the harder, and with more affection, as we perceive it to be less sure, and feare it should be taken from us.
      • Bible, Mark, ix.40:
        He that is not against us is on our part.
      • Edmund Waller (1606-1687)
        Make whole kingdoms take her brother's part.
  3. (US) The dividing line formed by combing the hair in different directions. syn. transl.
    The part of his hair was slightly to the left.
  4. (Judaism) In the Hebrew lunisolar calendar, a unit of time equivalent to 3⅓ seconds. syn.
  5. A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; talent; usually in the plural with a collective sense.
    • Edmund Burke (1729-1797)
      men of considerable parts
    • Thomas Macaulay (1800-1859)
      great quickness of parts
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      [] which maintained so politic a state of evil, that they will not admit any good part to intermingle with them.

Synonyms

Holonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

part (third-person singular simple present parts, present participle parting, simple past and past participle parted)

  1. (intransitive) To leave.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      He wrung Bassanio's hand, and so they parted.
    • Anthony Trollope (1815-1882)
      It was strange to him that a father should feel no tenderness at parting with an only son.
    • George Eliot (1819-1880)
      his precious bag, which he would by no means part from
  2. To cut hair with a parting; shed.
  3. (transitive) To divide in two.
    to part the curtains
    • 1884, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapter VII
      I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.
  4. (intransitive) To be divided in two or separated; shed.
    A rope parts. His hair parts in the middle.
  5. (transitive, now rare) To divide up; to share.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke III:
      He that hath ij. cootes, lett hym parte with hym that hath none: And he that hath meate, let him do lyke wyse.
    • Bible, John xix. 24
      They parted my raiment among them.
    • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
      to part his throne, and share his heaven with thee
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.x:
      He left three sonnes, his famous progeny, / Borne of faire Inogene of Italy; / Mongst whom he parted his imperiall state []
  6. (obsolete) To have a part or share; to partake.
  7. To separate or disunite; to remove from contact or contiguity; to sunder.
    • Bible, Luke xxiv. 51
      While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven.
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      The narrow seas that part / The French and English.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      "A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there. []."
  8. (obsolete) To hold apart; to stand or intervene between.
  9. To separate by a process of extraction, elimination, or secretion.
    to part gold from silver
    • Matthew Prior (1664-1721)
      The liver minds his own affair, [] / And parts and strains the vital juices.
  10. To leave; to quit.
  11. (transitive, Internet) To leave (an IRC channel).
    • 2000, "Phantom", Re: Uhm... hi... I guess... (on newsgroup alt.support.boy-lovers)
      He parted the channel saying "SHUTUP!" [] so I queried him, asking if there was something I could do [] maybe talk [] so we did [] since then, I've been seeing him on IRC every day (really can't imagine him not being on IRC anymore actually).

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

part (not comparable)

  1. Fractional; partial.
    Fred was part owner of the car.

Translations

Adverb

part (not comparable)

  1. Partly; partially; fractionally.
    Part finished

Derived terms

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: saw · things · left · #159: part · off · took · nothing

Anagrams


Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈpaɾt/
  • (Alghero) IPA(key): /ˈpaɫt/

Etymology 1

From Latin partus.

Noun

part m (plural parts)

  1. birth
  2. (figuratively) birth of an idea

Etymology 2

From Old Provençal part, from Latin partem, accusative of pars, from Proto-Italic *partis.

Noun

part f (plural parts)

  1. part

Related terms

Etymology 3

Borrowing from Latin Parthus (Parthia).

Adjective

part m (feminine parta, masculine plural parts, feminine plural partes)

  1. relating to Parthia; Parthian

Noun

part m (plural parts, feminine parta)

  1. Parthian

Dutch

Pronunciation

Noun

part n (plural parten, diminutive partje n)

  1. part

Estonian

Noun

part (genitive pardi, partitive parti)

  1. duck

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Faroese

Noun

part m

  1. part, accusative singular of partur
    fyri ein part - partial

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paʁ/

Etymology 1

From Old French part, from Latin partem, accusative of pars, from Proto-Italic *partis.

Noun

part f (plural parts)

  1. share
    une grande part - a large share
  2. portion, part
    une grande part de tarte - a large portion of cake
    pour ma part - for my part, as far as I'm concerned, as for me
    pour la part de mon ami - as far as my friend's concerned, as for my friend
  3. proportion
    une grande part de qch - A high or large proportion of something.
    il y a une grande part de fiction dans son récit - his/her account is highly fictional.
Derived terms
Related terms
Synonyms

Etymology 2

Conjugated form of -ir verb partir

Verb

part

  1. third-person singular present indicative of partir

Etymology 3

From Latin partus.

Noun

part m (plural parts)

  1. newborn

Friulian

Etymology 1

From Latin pars, partem.

Noun

part f (plural parts)

  1. part

Related terms

Etymology 2

From Latin partus.

Noun

part m (plural parts)

  1. delivery, birth, childbirth

See also


Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɒrt]
  • Hyphenation: part

Noun

part (plural partok)

  1. shore, bank, beach

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative part partok
accusative partot partokat
dative partnak partoknak
instrumental parttal partokkal
causal-final partért partokért
translative parttá partokká
terminative partig partokig
essive-formal partként partokként
essive-modal
inessive partban partokban
superessive parton partokon
adessive partnál partoknál
illative partba partokba
sublative partra partokra
allative parthoz partokhoz
elative partból partokból
delative partról partokról
ablative parttól partoktól
Possessive forms of part
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. partom partjaim
2nd person sing. partod partjaid
3rd person sing. partja partjai
1st person plural partunk partjaink
2nd person plural partotok partjaitok
3rd person plural partjuk partjaik

Derived terms

(Compound words):


Icelandic

Noun

part

  1. indefinite accusative singular of partur

Ladin

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin pars, partem.

Noun

part f (plural part)

  1. part

Related terms


Swedish

Etymology

Ultimately borrowed from Latin pars.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑːʈ

Noun

part c

  1. part, piece
  2. party (law: person), stakeholder
    att vara part i målet
    to have a stake in the claim, to partial, to be biased
    arbetsmarknadens parter
    the stakeholders of the labour market, i.e. trade unions and employers' organizations

Declension

Inflection of part 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative part parten parter parterna
Genitive parts partens parters parternas

Related terms