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Webster 1913 Edition


Patron

Pa′tron

,
Noun.
[F., fr. L.
patronus
, fr.
pater
a father. See
Paternal
, and cf.
Patroon
,
Padrone
,
Pattern
.]
1.
One who protects, supports, or countenances; a defender.
Patron of my life and liberty.”
Shak.
“The patron of true holiness.”
Spenser.
2.
(Rom. Antiq.)
(a)
A master who had freed his slave, but still retained some paternal rights over him.
(b)
A man of distinction under whose protection another person placed himself.
(c)
An advocate or pleader.
Let him who works the client wrong
Beware the
patron
’s ire.
Macaulay.
3.
One who encourages or helps a person, a cause, or a work; a furtherer; a promoter;
as, a
patron
of art
.
4.
(Eccl. Law)
One who has gift and disposition of a benefice.
[Eng.]
5.
A guardian saint. – called also
patron saint
.
6.
(Naut.)
See
Padrone
, 2.
Patrons of Husbandry
,
the grangers. See
Granger
, 2.

Pa′tron

,
Verb.
T.
To be a patron of; to patronize; to favor.
[Obs.]
Sir T. Browne.

Pa′tron

,
Adj.
Doing the duty of a patron; giving aid or protection; tutelary.
Dryden.
Patron saint
(R. C. Ch.)
,
a saint regarded as the peculiar protector of a country, community, church, profession, etc., or of an individual.

Webster 1828 Edition


Patron

PAT'RON

,
Noun.
[L. patronus; Gr. father.]
1.
Among the Romans, a master who had freed his slave, and retained some rights over him after his emancipation; also, a man of distinction under whose protection another placed himself. Hence,
2.
One who countenances, supports and protects either a person or a work.
3.
In the church of Rome, a guardian or saint, whose name a person bears, or under whose special care he is placed and whom he invokes; or a saint in whose name a church or order is founded.
4.
In the canon or common law, one who has the gift and disposition of a benefice.
5.
An advocate; a defender; one that specially countenances and supports, or lends aid to advance; as patrons of the arts; a patron of useful undertakings; the patrons of virtue.
6.
In seamen's language, the commander of a small vessel or passage-boat; also, one who steers a ship's long boat.

Definition 2022


Patron

Patron

See also: patron and patrón

German

Noun

Patron m (genitive Patrons, plural Patrone)

  1. patron
  2. (religion) patron saint

Synonyms

  • (patron): Schirmherr
  • (religion): Namenspatron, Schutzheiliger, Schutzpatron

patron

patron

See also: Patron and patrón

English

Noun

patron (plural patrons)

  1. One who protects or supports; a defender.
    • Shakespeare
      patron of my life and liberty
    • Spenser
      the patron of true holiness
  2. A regular customer, as of a certain store or restaurant.
    This car park is for patrons only.
  3. A property owner who hires a contractor for construction works.
  4. An influential, wealthy person who supported an artist, craftsman, a scholar or a noble.
  5. (historical, Roman antiquity) A master who had freed his slave but still retained some paternal rights over him.
  6. An advocate or pleader.
    • Macaulay
      Let him who works the client wrong / Beware the patron's ire.
  7. (Britain, ecclestiastical) One who has gift and disposition of a benefice.
  8. (nautical) A padrone.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

Verb

patron (third-person singular simple present patrons, present participle patroning, simple past and past participle patroned)

  1. (obsolete) To be a patron of; to patronize; to favour.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Thomas Browne to this entry?)

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Noun

patron (plural patrons)

  1. (uncommon) patron; wealthy person who supports an artist, craftsman, a scholar, etc.
  2. (uncommon, Roman Catholicism) patron saint
  3. (uncommon, Roman antiquity) patron

Synonyms


Esperanto

Noun

patron

  1. accusative singular of patro

French

Etymology

Old French patron (patron, protector), from Latin patrōnus, from pater (father).

Pronunciation

Noun

patron m (plural patrons)

  1. boss, employer
    Mon patron m’a accordé quelques jours de vacances supplémentaires.
    My boss gave me some extra vacation days.
  2. (sewing and knitting) pattern

Usage notes

Anagrams


Hiligaynon

Etymology

Borrowing from Spanish patrón.

Noun

patrón

  1. patron saint

Italian

Etymology

Borrowing from French patron.

Noun

patron m (invariable)

  1. patron (of a sports event etc)
  2. pattern (paper, for knitting)

Anagrams


Norman

Etymology

From Latin patrōnus, from pater (father).

Noun

patron m (plural patrons)

  1. (Jersey, sewing and knitting) pattern

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin patronus (sense 1), and French patron (senses 2 & 3)

Noun

patron m (definite singular patronen, indefinite plural patroner, definite plural patronene)

  1. a patron (person who gives financial or other support)
  2. a cartridge (ammunition)
  3. a cartridge (e.g. ink cartridge)

Derived terms

  • blekkpatron

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Latin patronus

Noun

patron m (definite singular patronen, indefinite plural patronar, definite plural patronane)

  1. a patron (person who gives financial or other support)

Etymology 2

From French patron

Noun

patron f (definite singular patrona, indefinite plural patroner, definite plural patronene)

  1. a cartridge (ammunition)
  2. a cartridge (e.g. ink cartridge)
Derived terms
  • blekkpatron

References


Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pǎtroːn/
  • Hyphenation: pat‧ron

Noun

pàtrōn m (Cyrillic spelling па̀тро̄н)

  1. patron
  2. protector

Declension


Swedish

Noun

patron c

  1. cartridge for a fire arm

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowing from French patron.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [patɾon]

Noun

patron (definite accusative patronu, plural patronlar)

  1. boss

Declension