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Definition 2022


Sorte

Sorte

See also: sorte

German

Noun

Sorte f (genitive Sorte, plural Sorten)

  1. sort, kind, variety
  2. type
  3. grade

sorte

sorte

See also: Sorte

English

Noun

sorte (plural sortes)

  1. Obsolete form of sort.
    • 1533, R. Saltwood:
      As plesaunt to the ere as the blacke sanctus Of a sad sorte vpon a mery pyn.

Danish

Adjective

sorte

  1. definite of sort
  2. plural of sort

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sors.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɔʁt/

Noun

sorte f (plural sortes)

  1. sort, kind, type
  2. way, manner

Derived terms

Verb

sorte

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of sortir
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of sortir

Anagrams


Italian

Etymology

From Latin sors, sortem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɔrte/
  • Rhymes: -ɔrte

Noun

sorte f (plural sorti)

  1. fate

Synonyms

Noun

sorte f pl

  1. plural of sorta

Verb

sorte

  1. third-person singular present of sortire
  2. feminine plural past participle of sorgere

Anagrams


Latin

Noun

sorte

  1. ablative singular of sors

References


Norman

Etymology

From Latin sors, sortem.

Noun

sorte f (plural sortes)

  1. (Guernsey) sort

Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

sorte

  1. definite singular of sort
  2. plural of sort

Old French

Noun

sorte f (oblique plural sortes, nominative singular sorte, nominative plural sortes)

  1. sort; type

Descendants


Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese sorte, from Latin sortis genitive singular of sors, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (to sort, lineup).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈsɔɾ.tɨ/
  • Hyphenation: sor‧te

Noun

sorte f (plural sortes)

  1. fate
  2. luck
    • 2007, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e as Relíquias da Morte (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows), Rocco, page 350:
      Harry mal respirava: será que a sorte, a pura sorte poderia livrá-los dessa encrenca?
      Harry was badly breathing: maybe luck, pure luck could save them from that trouble?

Derived terms