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Webster 1913 Edition


Vote

Vote

,
Noun.
[L.
votum
a vow, wish, will, fr.
vovere
,
votum
, to vow: cf. F.
vote
. See
Vow
.]
1.
An ardent wish or desire; a vow; a prayer.
[Obs.]
Massinger.
2.
A wish, choice, or opinion, of a person or a body of persons, expressed in some received and authorized way; the expression of a wish, desire, will, preference, or choice, in regard to any measure proposed, in which the person voting has an interest in common with others, either in electing a person to office, or in passing laws, rules, regulations, etc.; suffrage.
3.
That by means of which will or preference is expressed in elections, or in deciding propositions; voice; a ballot; a ticket;
as, a written
vote
.
The freeman casting with unpurchased hand
The
vote
that shakes the turrets of the land.
Holmes.
4.
Expression of judgment or will by a majority; legal decision by some expression of the minds of a number;
as, the
vote
was unanimous; a
vote
of confidence
.
5.
Votes, collectively;
as, the Tory
vote
; the labor
vote
.
Casting vote
,
Cumulative vote
, etc.
See under
Casting
,
Cumulative
, etc.

Vote

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Voted
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Voting
.]
[Cf. F.
voter
.]
To express or signify the mind, will, or preference, either viva voce, or by ballot, or by other authorized means, as in electing persons to office, in passing laws, regulations, etc., or in deciding on any proposition in which one has an interest with others.
The
vote
for a duelist is to assist in the prostration of justice, and, indirectly, to encourage the crime.
L. Beecher.
To
vote
on large principles, to
vote
honestly, requires a great amount of information.
F. W. Robertson.

Vote

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To choose by suffrage; to elec[GREEK];
as, to
vote
a candidate into office
.
2.
To enact, establish, grant, determine, etc., by a formal vote;
as, the legislature
voted
the resolution
.
Parliament
voted
them one hundred thousand pounds.
Swift.
3.
To declare by general opinion or common consent, as if by a vote;
as, he was
voted
a bore
.
[Colloq.]
4.
To condemn; to devote; to doom.
[Obs.]
Glanvill.

Webster 1828 Edition


Vote

VOTE

,
Noun.
[L. votum, from voveo, to vow. Votum is properly wish or will.]
1.
Suffrage; the expression of a wish, desire, will, preference or choice, in regard to any measure proposed, in which the person voting has an interest in common with others, either in electing a man to office, or in passing laws, rules, regulations and the like. This vote or expression of will may be given by holding up the hand, by rising and standing up, by the voice, [viva voce.] by ballot, by a ticket or otherwise. All these modes and others are used. Hence,
2.
That by which will or preference is expressed in elections or in deciding propositions; a ballot; a ticket, &c.; as a written vote.
3.
Expression of will be a majority; legal decision by some expression of the minds of a number; as, the vote was unanimous.
4.
United voice in public prayer.

Definition 2022


Vote

Vote

See also: vote, voté, !vote, and vot'e

English

Noun

Vote (plural Votes)

  1. A person from Votia or of Votic descent.

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

vote

vote

See also: Vote, voté, !vote, and vot'e

English

Women casting their votes during the Syrian presidential election, 2014

Noun

vote (plural votes)

  1. A formalized choice on matters of administration or other democratic activities.
    The city council decided the matter should go to public vote.
    Parliament will hold a vote of confidence regarding the minister.
  2. An act or instance of participating in such a choice, e.g., by submitting a ballot.
    The Supreme Court upheld the principle of one person, one vote.
    • 1836, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., “Poetry: A Metrical Essay”, republished in The Poems of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Boston, Mass.: Ticknor and Fields, 1862, OCLC 5091562, pages 7–8:
      There breathes no being but has some pretence / To that fine instinct called poetic sense; [] / The freeman, casting with unpurchased hand / The vote that shakes the turrets of the land.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, chapter I”, in Gossamer (Project Gutenberg; EBook #24394), London: Methuen & Co., published 8 January 2013 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 558189256:
      As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish, but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
  3. (obsolete) An ardent wish or desire; a vow; a prayer.
    • 1633, Philip Massinger, “The Guardian”, in Three New Playes; viz. The Bashful Lover, The Guardian, The Very Woman. As They have been Often Acted at the Private-House in Black-Friers, by His Late Majesties Servants, with Great Applause, London: Printed for Humphrey Moseley, and are to be sold at his Shop at the Sign of the Prince's Arms in St. Pauls Church-yard, published 1655, OCLC 15553475; republished as “The Guardian. A Comical History. As It hath been Often Acted at the Private-House in Black-Friars, by His Late Majesty's Servants, with Great Applause, 1655.”, in Thomas Coxeter, editor, The Works of Philip Massinger. Volume the Fourth. Containing, The Guardian. A Very Woman. The Old Law. The City Madam. And Poems on Several Occasions, volume IV, London: Printed for T[homas] Davies, in Russel-street, Covent-Garden, 1761, OCLC 6847259, Act V, scene i, page 71:
      Jol[ante]. In you, Sir, / I live; and when, or by the Courſe of Nature, / Or Violence you muſt fall, the End of my / Devotions is, that one and the ſame Hour / May make us fit for Heaven. // Server. I join with you / In my votes that way: []

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

vote (third-person singular simple present votes, present participle voting, simple past and past participle voted)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) To cast a vote; to assert a formalized choice in an election.
    The depository may vote shares on behalf of investors who have not submitted instruction to the bank.
    • F. W. Robertson
      To vote on large principles, to vote honestly, requires a great amount of information.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Anagrams


Asturian

Verb

vote

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of votar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of votar

French

Etymology

Borrowing from English vote.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɔt/

Noun

vote m (plural votes)

  1. vote

Related terms

Verb

vote

  1. first-person singular present indicative of voter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of voter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of voter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of voter
  5. second-person singular imperative of voter

Anagrams


Latin

Participle

vōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of vōtus

Norman

Etymology

Borrowing from English vote, from Latin vōtum, from voveō, vovēre (vow), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ewegʷʰ-.

Noun

vote m (plural votes)

  1. (Jersey) vote

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈvɔ.t͡ʃi/

Verb

vote

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of votar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of votar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of votar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of votar

Spanish

Verb

vote

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of votar.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of votar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of votar.