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Webster 1913 Edition


Cook

Cook

(koōk)
,
Verb.
I.
[Of imitative origin.]
To make the noise of the cuckoo.
[Obs. or R.]
Constant cuckoos
cook
on every side.
The Silkworms (1599).

Cook

(koŏk)
,
Verb.
T.
[Etymol. unknown.]
To throw.
[Prov.Eng.]
Cook me that ball.”
Grose.

Cook

(koŏk)
,
Noun.
[AS.
cōc
, fr. L.
cocus
,
coquus
,
coquus
, fr.
coquere
to cook; akin to Gr.
πέπτειν
, Skr.
pac
, and to E.
apricot
,
biscuit
,
concoct
,
dyspepsia
,
precocious
. Cf.
Pumpkin
.]
1.
One whose occupation is to prepare food for the table; one who dresses or cooks meat or vegetables for eating.
2.
(Zool.)
A fish, the European striped wrasse.

Cook

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Cooked
(koŏkt)
;
p. pr & vb. n.
Cooking
.]
1.
To prepare, as food, by boiling, roasting, baking, broiling, etc.; to make suitable for eating, by the agency of fire or heat.
2.
To concoct or prepare; hence, to tamper with or alter; to garble; – often with up;
as, to
cook
up a story; to
cook
an account
.
[Colloq.]
They all of them receive the same advices from abroad, and very often in the same words; but their way of
cooking
it is so different.
Addison.

Cook

(koŏk)
,
Verb.
I.
To prepare food for the table.

Webster 1828 Edition


Cook

COOK

,
Verb.
T.
[L.]
1.
To prepare, as victuals for the table, by boiling, roasting, baking, broiling, &c. To dress, as meat or vegetables, for eating.
2.
To prepare for any purpose.
3.
To throw. [Obs. or local.]

COOK

,
Verb.
I.
To make the noise of the cuckoo.

COOK

,
Noun.
[L.] One whose occupation is to prepare victuals for the table; a man or woman who dresses meat or vegetables for eating.

Definition 2022


Cook

Cook

See also: cook

English

Alternative forms

Proper noun

Cook

  1. A surname.
  2. A city and a county in Minnesota
  3. A village in Nebraska
  4. A ghost town in South Australia

Derived terms

  • Cook Peninsula

cook

cook

See also: Cook

English

Trainee cooks preparing food

Noun

cook (plural cooks)

  1. (cooking) A person who prepares food for a living.
  2. (cooking) The head cook of a manor house
  3. (slang) One who manufactures certain illegal drugs, especially meth.
    Police found two meth cooks working in the illicit lab.
    • 2008, Mel Bradshaw, Victim Impact
      By late October, the pressure on the Dark Arrows' ecstasy cook had eased. Other suppliers had moved in with product.
    • 2011, Mackenzie Phillips, High on Arrival
      Owsley Stanley was a pioneer LSD cook, and the Purple Owsley pill from his now-defunct lab was Dad's prized possession, a rare, potent, druggie collector's item, the alleged inspiration for the Hendrix song “Purple Haze.”
  4. (slang) A session of manufacturing certain illegal drugs, especially meth.
    • 2011, Neal Hall, **** To Pay: Hells Angels vs. The Million-Dollar Rat (page 36)
      Punko told Plante he wanted to use a full barrel for the next cook.
  5. A fish, the European striped wrasse.
Synonyms
  • (food preparation for a living): chef
Hyponyms
Coordinate terms

(food preparation for a living):

(head cook of a manor house):

Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English coken, from the noun cook.

Verb

cook (third-person singular simple present cooks, present participle cooking, simple past and past participle cooked)

  1. (transitive) To prepare (food) for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients.
    I'm cooking bangers and mash.
  2. (intransitive) To prepare (unspecified) food for eating by heating it, often by combining it with other ingredients.
    He's in the kitchen, cooking.
  3. (intransitive) To be being cooked.
    The dinner is cooking on the stove.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To be uncomfortably hot.
    Look at that poor dog shut up in that car on a day like today - it must be cooking in there.
  5. (transitive, slang) To hold onto (a grenade) briefly after igniting the fuse, so that it explodes almost immediately after being thrown.
    I always cook my frags, in case they try to grab one and throw it back.
  6. To concoct or prepare.
    • 2006, Frank Spalding, Methamphetamine: The Dangers of Crystal Meth (page 47)
      The process of cooking meth can leave residue on surfaces all over the home, exposing all of its occupants to the drug.
  7. To tamper with or alter; to cook up.
    • 1880, Joseph Addison; Richard John Green, “The newspaper”, in Essays of Joseph Addison, London: Roger de Coverly Club, page 154:
      They all of them receive the same advices from abroad, and very often in the same words; but their way of cooking it is so different, that there is no citizen, who has an eye to the public good, who can leave the coffee-house with peace of mind...
  8. (intransitive, idiomatic, jazz, slang) To play or improvise in an inspired and rhythmically exciting way. (From 1930s jive talk.)
    Watch this band: they cook!
    Crank up the Coltrane and start cooking!
  9. (intransitive, idiomatic, music, slang) To play music vigorously.
    On the Wagner piece, the orchestra was cooking!
Synonyms
Hypernyms
Hyponyms
Translations

Etymology 3

Imitative.

Verb

cook (third-person singular simple present cooks, present participle cooking, simple past and past participle cooked)

  1. (obsolete, rare, intransitive) To make the noise of the cuckoo.
    • 1599, Thomas Moffet, The Silkwormes, and their Flies, London: V.S. for Nicholas Ling, OCLC 428112023:
      Constant cuckoos cook on every side.

Etymology 4

Unknown; possibly related to chuck.

Verb

cook (third-person singular simple present cooks, present participle cooking, simple past and past participle cooked)

  1. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) To throw.
    • 1787, Francis Grose, A Provincial Glossary: With a Collection of Local Proverbs, and Popular Superstitions, London: Printed for S. Hooper, OCLC 938433091, page 37:
      Cook. To throw. Cook me that ball, throw me that ball. Glou.

Middle English

Noun

cook (plural cooks)

  1. a cook

Descendants