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Webster 1913 Edition


Corn

Corn

(kôrn)
,
Noun.
[L.
cornu
horn: cf. F.
corne
horn, hornlike excrescence. See
Horn
.]
A thickening of the epidermis at some point, esp. on the toes, by friction or pressure. It is usually painful and troublesome.
Welcome, gentlemen! Ladies that have their toes
Unplagued with
corns
, will have a bout with you.
Shakespeare
☞ The substance of a corn usually resembles horn, but where moisture is present, as between the toes, it is white and sodden, and is called a
soft corn
.

Corn

,
Noun.
[AS.
corn
; akin to OS.
korn
, D.
koren
, G., Dan., Sw., & Icel.
korn
, Goth.
kaúrn
, L.
granum
, Russ.
zerno
. Cf.
Grain
,
Kernel
.]
1.
A single seed of certain plants, as wheat, rye, barley, and maize; a grain.
2.
The various farinaceous grains of the cereal grasses used for food, as wheat, rye, barley, maize, oats.
4.
The plants which produce corn, when growing in the field; the stalks and ears, or the stalks, ears, and seeds, after reaping and before thrashing.
In one night, ere glimpse of morn,
His shadowy flail had thrashed the
corn
.
Milton.
5.
A small, hard particle; a grain.
Corn of sand.”
Bp. Hall.
“A corn of powder.”
Beau. & Fl.
Corn ball
,
a ball of popped corn stuck together with soft candy from molasses or sugar.
Corn bread
,
bread made of Indian meal.
Corn cake
,
a kind of corn bread; johnny cake; hoecake.
Corn cockle
(Bot.)
,
a weed (
Agrostemma Githago
syn.
Lychnis Githago
), having bright flowers, common in grain fields.
Corn flag
(Bot.)
,
a plant of the genus
Gladiolus
; – called also
sword lily
.
Corn fly
.
(Zool.)
(a)
A small fly which, in the larval state, is injurious to grain, living in the stalk, and causing the disease called “gout,” on account of the swelled joints. The common European species is
Chlorops tæniopus
.
(b)
A small fly (
Anthomyia ze
) whose larva or maggot destroys seed corn after it has been planted.
Corn fritter
,
a fritter having green Indian corn mixed through its batter.
[U. S.]
Corn laws
,
laws regulating trade in corn, especially those in force in Great Britain till 1846, prohibiting the importation of foreign grain for home consumption, except when the price rose above a certain rate.
Corn marigold
.
(Bot.)
See under
Marigold
.
Corn oyster
,
a fritter containing grated green Indian corn and butter, the combined taste resembling that of oysters.
[U.S.]
Corn parsley
(Bot.)
,
a plant of the parsley genus (
Petroselinum segetum
), a weed in parts of Europe and Asia.
Corn popper
,
a utensil used in popping corn.
Corn poppy
(Bot.)
,
the red poppy (
Papaver Rhœas
), common in European cornfields; – also called
corn rose
.
Corn rent
,
rent paid in corn.
Corn rose
.
See
Corn poppy
.
Corn salad
(Bot.)
,
a name given to several species of
Valerianella
, annual herbs sometimes used for salad.
Valerianella olitoria
is also called
lamb’s lettuce
.
Corn stone
,
red limestone.
[Prov. Eng.]
Corn violet
(Bot.)
,
a species of
Campanula
.
Corn weevil
.
(Zool.)
(a)
A small weevil which causes great injury to grain.
(b)
In America, a weevil (
Sphenophorus zeæ
) which attacks the stalk of maize near the root, often doing great damage. See
Grain weevil
, under
Weevil
.

Corn

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Corned
(k?rnd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Corning
.]
1.
To preserve and season with salt in grains; to sprinkle with salt; to cure by salting; now, specifically, to salt slightly in brine or otherwise;
as, to
corn
beef; to
corn
a tongue
.
2.
To form into small grains; to granulate;
as, to
corn
gunpowder
.
3.
To feed with corn or (in Sctland) oats;
as, to
corn
horses
.
Jamieson.
4.
To render intoxicated;
as, ale strong enough to
corn
one
.
[Colloq.]
Corning house
,
a house or place where powder is corned or granulated.

Webster 1828 Edition


Corn

CORN

,
Noun.
[G., L. See Grain.]
1.
A single seed of certain plants, as wheat, rye, barley and maiz; a grain. In this sense, it has a plural; as, three barley corns make an inch. It is generally applied to edible seeds, which, when ripe, are hard.
2.
The seeds of certain plants in general, in bulk or quantity; as, corn is dear or scarce. In this sense, the word comprehends all the kinds of grain which constitute the food of men and horses. In Great Britain, corn is generally applied to wheat, rye, oats and barley. In the United States, it has the same general sense, but by custom, it is appropriated to maiz. We are accustomed to say, the crop of wheat is good, but the corn is bad; it is a good year for wheat and rye, but bad for corn. In this sense, corn has no plural.
3.
The plants which produce corn, when growing in the field; the stalks and ears, or the stalks, ears and seeds, after reaping and before thrashing. We say, a field of corn, a sheaf or a shock of corn, a load of corn. The plants or stalks are included in the terms corn, until the seed is separated from the ears.
4.
In surgery, a hard excrescence, or induration of the skin, on the toes or some part of the feet, occasioned by the pressure of the shoes; so called from its hardness and resemblance to a corn.
5.
A small hard particle. [See Grain.]

CORN

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To preserve and season with salt in grains; to sprinkle with salt; as, to corn beef.
2.
To granulate; to form into small grains.

Definition 2021


Corn

Corn

See also: corn, còrn, Còrn, and -corn

English

Proper noun

Corn

  1. A town in Oklahoma

corn

corn

See also: -corn, còrn, Còrn, and Corn

English

Noun

corn (usually uncountable, plural corns)

  1. (Britain, uncountable) The main cereal plant grown for its grain in a given region, such as oats in parts of Scotland and Ireland, and wheat or barley in England and Wales.
    • 1847, John Mason Neale, Stories from heathen mythology and Greek history, page 115:
      Among the divinities that dwelt on Mount Olympus, none was more friendly to the husbandman than Demeter, goddess of corn.
    • 1867, Karl Marx (Samuel Moore & Edward Aveling, translators), Das Kapital:
      However much the individual manufacturer might give the rein to his old lust for gain, the spokesmen and political leaders of the manufacturing class ordered a change of front and of speech towards the workpeople. They had entered upon the contest for the repeal of the Corn Laws, and needed the workers to help them to victory. They promised therefore, not only a double-sized loaf of bread, but the enactment of the Ten Hours' Bill in the Free-trade millennium.
    • 1909, Johann David Wyss (Susannah Mary Paull, translator), The Swiss Family Robinson, page 462:
      I found that we had nearly a hundred bushels of corn, including wheat, maize, and barley, to add to our store.
  2. (US, Canada, Australia, uncountable) Maize, a grain crop of the species Zea mays.
    • 1809, Edward Augustus Kendall, Travels Through the Northern Parts of the United States:
      The planting or sowing of maize, exclusively called corn, was just accomplished on the Town Hill, when I reached it.
  3. A grain or seed, especially of a cereal crop.
    He paid her the nominal fee of two corns of barley.
  4. A small, hard particle.
    • Bishop Hall:
      corn of sand
    • Beaumont and Fletcher:
      a corn of powder
corn (Zea mays)
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Verb

corn (third-person singular simple present corns, present participle corning, simple past and past participle corned)

  1. (US, Canada) To granulate; to form a substance into grains.
    to corn gunpowder
  2. (US, Canada) To preserve using coarse salt, e.g. corned beef
  3. (US, Canada) To provide with corn (typically maize; or, in Scotland, oats) for feed.
    Corn the horses.
  4. (transitive) To render intoxicated.
    ale strong enough to corn one
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Old French corn (modern French cor).

Feet with corns

Noun

corn (plural corns)

  1. A type of callus, usually on the feet or hands.
    • Shakespeare
      Welcome, gentlemen! Ladies that have their toes / Unplagued with corns, will have a bout with you.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
Translations

Etymology 3

This use was first used in 1932, as corny, something appealing to country folk.

Noun

corn (uncountable)

  1. (US, Canada) Something (e.g. acting, humour, music, or writing) which is deemed old-fashioned or intended to induce emotion.[1]
    • 1975, Tschirlie, Backpacker magazine,
      He had a sharp wit, true enough, but also a good, healthy mountaineer's love of pure corn, the slapstick stuff, the in-jokes that get funnier with every repetition and never amuse anybody who wasn't there.
    • 1986, Linda Martin and Kerry Segrave, Women in Comedy,
      There were lots of jokes on the show and they were pure corn, but the audience didn't mind.
    • 2007, Bob L. Cox, Fiddlin' Charlie Bowman: an East Tennessee old-time music pioneer and his musical family,
      The bulk of this humor was pure corn, but as hillbilly material it was meant to be that way.
Derived terms

Etymology 4

From the resemblance to white corn kernels.

Noun

corn (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) A type of granular snow formed by repeated melting and re-freezing, often in mountain spring conditions.
Synonyms
  • corn snow

References

  1. “Corn (emotion)”, in Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, Cambridge University Press, (Please provide a date or year)

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin cornū, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (horn).

Noun

corn m (plural corns)

  1. horn (of animal)
  2. (music) horn

Synonyms

Derived terms


Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish corn (drinking horn, goblet; trumpet, horn; curl), from Latin cornū.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /koːɾˠn̪ˠ/

Noun

corn m (genitive singular coirn, nominative plural coirn)

  1. horn (musical instrument)
  2. drinking-horn
  3. (sports) cup
  4. (racing) plate

Declension

Synonyms

Derived terms

Verb

corn (present analytic cornann, future analytic cornfaidh, verbal noun cornadh, past participle corntha)

  1. roll, coil

Conjugation

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
corn chorn gcorn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *kurną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵr̥h₂nóm (grain). Cognate with Old Frisian korn, Old Saxon korn (Low German Koorn), Dutch koren, Old High German korn (German Korn), Old Norse korn (Danish and Swedish korn), Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌽 (kaurn).

Pronunciation

Noun

corn n

  1. corn, a grain or seed
    • Hie wæron benumene ægðer ge ðæs ceapes ge ðæs cornes: they were deprived both of cattle and of corn. (Anglo-Saxon Chronicle)
  2. a cornlike pimple, a corn on the foot

Descendants


Old French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From Latin cornū.

Noun

corn m (oblique plural corns, nominative singular corns, nominative plural corn)

  1. horn (bony projection found on the head of some animals)
  2. horn (instrument used to create sound)

Synonyms

Descendants


Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [korn]

Etymology 1

From Latin cornū, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (horn).

Noun

corn n (plural coarne)

  1. horn
Declension
Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

From Latin cornus.

Noun

Flowers of the European Cornel; Florile cornului

corn m (plural corni)

  1. cornel, European cornel, Cornus mas
  2. rafter (of a house)
Declension

See also


Scots

Etymology

From Old English corn.

Noun

corn (plural corns)

  1. corn
  2. oats
  3. (in plural) crops (of grain)

Verb

corn (third-person singular present corns, present participle cornin, past cornt, past participle cornt)

  1. to feed (a horse) with oats or grain

Welsh

Etymology

Borrowing from Latin cornū

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔrn/

Noun

corn m (plural cyrn)

  1. horn

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
corn gorn nghorn chorn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.