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Webster 1913 Edition


Coat

Coat

(kōt; 110)
,
Noun.
[OF.
cote
, F.
cotte
, petticoat,
cotte d’armes
coat of arms,
cotte de mailles
coat of mail, LL.
cota
,
cotta
, tunic, prob. of German origin; cf. OHG.
chozzo
coarse mantle, G.
klotze
, D.
kot
, hut, E.
cot
. Cf.
Cot
a hut.]
1.
An outer garment fitting the upper part of the body; especially, such a garment worn by men.
Let each
His adamantine
coat
gird well.
Milton.
2.
A petticoat.
[Obs.]
“A child in coats.”
Locke.
3.
The habit or vesture of an order of men, indicating the order or office; cloth.
Men of his
coat
should be minding their prayers.
Swift.
She was sought by spirits of richest
coat
.
Shakespeare
4.
An external covering like a garment, as fur, skin, wool, husk, or bark;
as, the horses
coats
were sleek
.
Fruit of all kinds, in
coat

Rough or smooth rined, or bearded husk, or shell.
Milton.
5.
A layer of any substance covering another; a cover; a tegument;
as, the
coats
of the eye; the
coats
of an onion; a
coat
of tar or varnish
.
6.
Same as Coat of arms. See below.
Hark, countrymen! either renew the fight,
Or tear the lions out of England's
coat
.
Shakespeare
7.
A coat card. See below.
[Obs.]
Here's a trick of discarded cards of us! We were ranked with
coats
as long as old master lived.
Massinger.
Coat armor
.
See under
Armor
.
Coat of arms
(Her.)
,
a translation of the French cotte d'armes, a garment of light material worn over the armor in the 15th and 16th centuries. This was often charged with the heraldic bearings of the wearer. Hence, an heraldic achievement; the bearings of any person, taken together.
Coat card
,
a card bearing a coated figure; the king, queen, or knave of playing cards.
“‘I am a coat card indeed.' ‘Then thou must needs be a knave, for thou art neither king nor queen.'”
Rowley.
Coat link
,
a pair of buttons or studs joined by a link, to hold together the lappels of a double-breasted coat; or a button with a loop for a single-breasted coat.
Coat of mail
,
a defensive garment of chain mail.
See
Chain mail
, under
Chain
. –
Mast coat
(Naut.)
,
a piece of canvas nailed around a mast, where it passes through the deck, to prevent water from getting below.
Sail coat
(Naut.)
,
a canvas cover laced over furled sails, and the like, to keep them dry and clean.

Coat

(kōt)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Coated
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Coating
.]
1.
To cover with a coat or outer garment.
2.
To cover with a layer of any substance;
as, to
coat
a jar with tin foil; to
coat
a ceiling
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Coat

COAT

, n.
1.
An upper garment, of whatever material it may be made. The word is, in modern times, generally applied to the garment worn by men next over the vest.
God made coats of skin and clothed them. Gen 3.
Jacob made Joseph a coat of many colors. Gen. 37.
He shall put on the holy linen coat. Levit. 16.
Goliath was armed with a coat of mail. 1 Sam. 17.
2.
A petticoat; a garment worn by infants or young children.
3.
The habit or vesture of an order of men, indicating the order or office.
Men of his coat should be minding their prayers.
So we say, men of his cloth.
4.
External covering, as the fur or hair of a beast, the skin of serpents, the wool of sheep, &c.
5.
A tunic of the eye; a membrane that serves as a cover; a tegument.
6.
The division or layer of a bulbous root; as the coats of an onion.
7.
A cover; a layer of any substance covering another; as a coat of tar, pitch or varnish; a coat of canvas round a mast; a coat of tin-foil.
8.
That on which ensigns armorial are portrayed; usually called a coat of arms. Anciently knights wore a habit over their arms, reaching as low as the navel, open at the sides, with short sleeves, on which were the armories of the knights, embroidered in gold and silver, and enameled with beaten tin of various colors. This habit was diversified with bands and fillets of several colors, placed alternately, and called devises, as being divided and composed of several pieces sewed together. The representation of these is still called a coat of arms.
9.
A coat of mail is a piece of armor, in form of a shirt, consisting of a net-work of iron rings.
10.
A card; a coat-card is one on which a king, queen or knave is painted.

COAT

, v.t.
1.
To cover or spread over with a layer of any substance; as, to coat a retort; to coat a ceiling; to coat a vial.
2.
To cover with cloth or canvas; as, to coat a mast or a pump.

Definition 2021


coat

coat

English

Navy pea coat

Alternative forms

Noun

coat (countable and uncountable, plural coats)

  1. (countable) An outer garment covering the upper torso and arms.Wp
    • 1906, Stanley J[ohn] Weyman, chapter I, in Chippinge Borough, New York, N.Y.: McClure, Phillips & Co., OCLC 580270828:
      It was April 22, 1831, and a young man was walking down Whitehall in the direction of Parliament Street. He wore shepherd's plaid trousers and the swallow-tail coat of the day, with a figured muslin cravat wound about his wide-spread collar.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, An Autobiography, Part II, chapter4:
      Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. [] Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. (countable) A covering of material, such as paint.Wp
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      Fruit of all kinds, in coat / Rough or smooth rined, or bearded husk, or shell.
  3. (countable) The fur or feathers covering an animal's skin.Wp
    When the dog shed its coat, it left hair all over the furniture and the carpet.
  4. (uncountable, nautical) Canvas painted with thick tar and secured round a mast or bowsprit to prevent water running down the sides into the hold (now made of rubber or leather).
  5. (obsolete) A petticoat.
  6. The habit or vesture of an order of men, indicating the order or office; cloth.
  7. A coat of arms.Wp
    • William Shakespeare (c.1564–1616)
      Hark, countrymen! either renew the fight, / Or tear the lions out of England's coat.
  8. A coat card.
    • Philip Massinger (1583-1640)
      Here's a trick of discarded cards of us! We were ranked with coats as long as old master lived.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

coat (third-person singular simple present coats, present participle coating, simple past and past participle coated)

  1. To cover with a coat of some material
    One can buy coated frying pans, which are much easier to wash up than normal ones.
  2. To cover as a coat.

Translations

Anagrams