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Webster 1913 Edition


Pardon

Par′don

(pär′d’n)
,
Noun.
[F., fr.
pardonner
to pardon. See
Pardon
,
Verb.
T.
]
1.
The act of pardoning; forgiveness, as of an offender, or of an offense; release from penalty; remission of punishment; absolution.
Pardon
, my lord, for me and for my tidings.
Shakespeare
But infinite in
pardon
was my judge.
Milton.
2.
An official warrant of remission of penalty.
Sign me a present
pardon
for my brother.
Shakespeare
3.
The state of being forgiven.
South.
4.
(Law)
A release, by a sovereign, or officer having jurisdiction, from the penalties of an offense, being distinguished from
amnesty
, which is a general obliteration and canceling of a particular line of past offenses.
Syn. – Forgiveness; remission. See
Forgiveness
.

Par′don

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Pardoned
(pär′d’nd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Pardoning
.]
[Either fr.
pardon
, n., or from F.
pardonner
, LL.
perdonare
; L.
per
through, thoroughly, perfectly +
donare
to give, to present. See
Par-
, and
Donation
.]
1.
To absolve from the consequences of a fault or the punishment of crime; to free from penalty; – applied to the offender.
In this thing the Lord
pardon
thy servant.
2 Kings v. 18.
I pray you,
pardon
me; pray heartily,
pardon
me.
Shakespeare
2.
To remit the penalty of; to suffer to pass without punishment; to forgive; – applied to offenses.
I pray thee,
pardon
my sin.
1 Sam. xv. 25.
Apollo,
pardon

My great profaneness ’gainst thine oracle!
Shakespeare
3.
To refrain from exacting as a penalty.
I
pardon
thee thy life before thou ask it.
Shakespeare
4.
To give leave (of departure) to.
[Obs.]
Even now about it! I will
pardon
you.
Shakespeare
Syn. – To forgive; absolve; excuse; overlook; remit; acquit. See
Excuse
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Pardon

P`ARDON

,
Verb.
T.
[L. per and dono, to give; per having the sense of the English for in forgive, and re in L. remitto, properly to give back or away.]
1.
To forgive; to remit; as an offense or crime. Guilt implies a being bound or subjected to censure, penalty or punishment. To pardon, is to give up this obligation, and release the offender. We apply the word to the crime or to the person. We pardon an offense, when we remove it from the offender and consider him as not guilty; we pardon the offender, when we release or absolve him from his liability to suffer punishment.
I pray thee, pardon my sin. 1 Sam.15.
2.
To remit, as a penalty.
I pardon thee thy life before thou ask it.
3.
To excuse, as for a fault.
4.
Pardon me, is a phrase used when one asks for excuse, or makes an apology, and it is often used in this sense, when a person means civilly to deny or contradict what another affirms.

P`ARDON

,
Noun.
Forgiveness; the release of an offense or of the obligation of the offender to suffer a penalty, or to bear the displeasure of the offended party. We seek the pardon of sins, transgressions and offenses.
1.
Remission of a penalty. An amnesty is a general pardon.
2.
Forgiveness received.

Definition 2023


Pardon

Pardon

See also: pardon

German

Noun

Pardon m (genitive Pardons, no plural) (also n )

  1. pardon

pardon

pardon

See also: Pardon

English

Noun

pardon (plural pardons)

  1. Forgiveness for an offence.
    • 1748: Samuel Richardson, Clarissa
      a step, that could not be taken with the least hope of ever obtaining pardon from or reconciliation with any of my friends;
  2. (law) An order that releases a convicted criminal without further punishment, prevents future punishment, or (in some jurisdictions) removes an offence from a person's criminal record, as if it had never been committed.
    • 1974: President Gerald Ford, Proclamation 4311
      I... have granted and by these presents do grant a full, free, and absolute pardon unto Richard Nixon for all offenses against the United States ...

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

pardon (third-person singular simple present pardons, present participle pardoning, simple past and past participle pardoned)

  1. (transitive) To forgive.
    • 1599: William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar
      O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, / That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
    • 1815: Jane Austen, Emma
      I hope you will not find he has outstepped the truth more than may be pardoned, in consideration of the motive.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity:
      In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, [], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned.
  2. (transitive) To refrain from exacting as a penalty.
    • Shakespeare
      I pardon thee thy life before thou ask it.
  3. (transitive, law) To grant an official pardon for a crime; unguilt.

Derived terms

Translations

Interjection

Pardon?

  1. Often used when someone does not understand what another person says.
    Pardon?, What did you say?, Can you say that again?

Synonyms

  • See also Wikisaurus:say again

Translations


Czech

Alternative forms

  • pardón

Interjection

pardon

  1. sorry, I'm sorry, I beg your pardon, I apologize

Synonyms


French

Etymology

Deverbal of pardonner.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paʁ.dɔ̃/

Interjection

pardon

  1. excuse me
  2. sorry

Descendants

  • Bulgarian: пардон́ (pardoń, colloquial)
  • Czech: pardón (colloquial)

Noun

pardon m (plural pardons)

  1. pardon, forgiveness

Anagrams


Romanian

Etymology

From French pardon.

Interjection

pardon

  1. pardon!, pardon me!, excuse me!, I beg your pardon!, sorry!

Noun

pardon n (uncountable)

  1. (dated) pardon, pardoning, forgiveness, excuse

Synonyms

See also


Swedish

Noun

pardon c

  1. mercy

Synonyms

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowing from French pardon.

Interjection

pardon

  1. pardon!, pardon me!, excuse me!, I beg your pardon!, sorry!