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Webster 1913 Edition


Job

Job

(jŏb)
,
Noun.
[Prov. E.
job
,
gob
,
Noun.
, a small piece of wood, v., to stab, strike; cf. E.
gob
,
gobbet
; perh. influenced by E.
chop
to cut off, to mince. See
Gob
.]
1.
A sudden thrust or stab; a jab.
2.
A piece of chance or occasional work; any definite work undertaken in gross for a fixed price;
as, he did the
job
for a thousand dollars
.
3.
A public transaction done for private profit; something performed ostensibly as a part of official duty, but really for private gain; a corrupt official business.
4.
Any affair or event which affects one, whether fortunately or unfortunately.
[Colloq.]
5.
A situation or opportunity of work;
as, he lost his
job
.
[Colloq.]
Job is used adjectively to signify doing jobs, used for jobs, or let on hire to do jobs; as, job printer; job master; job horse; job wagon, etc.

Job

(jŏb)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Jobbed
(jŏbd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Jobbing
.]
1.
To strike or stab with a pointed instrument.
L’Estrange.
2.
To thrust in, as a pointed instrument.
Moxon.
3.
To do or cause to be done by separate portions or lots; to sublet (work);
as, to
job
a contract
.
4.
(Com.)
To buy and sell, as a broker; to purchase of importers or manufacturers for the purpose of selling to retailers;
as, to
job
goods
.
5.
To hire or let by the job or for a period of service;
as, to
job
a carriage
.
Thackeray.

Job

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To do chance work for hire; to work by the piece; to do petty work.
Authors of all work, to
job
for the season.
Moore.
2.
To seek private gain under pretense of public service; to turn public matters to private advantage.
And judges
job
, and bishops bite the town.
Pope.
3.
To carry on the business of a jobber in merchandise or stocks.

Job

(jōb)
,
Noun.
The hero of the book of that name in the Old Testament; the prototypical patient man.
Job's comforter
.
(a)
A false friend; a tactless or malicious person who, under pretense of sympathy, insinuates rebukes.
(b)
A boil
.
[Colloq.]
Job's news
,
bad news.
Carlyle.
Job's tears
(Bot.)
,
a kind of grass (
Coix Lacryma
), with hard, shining, pearly grains.

Webster 1828 Edition


Job

JOB

,
Noun.
[of unknown origin, but perhaps allied to chop, primarily to strike or drive.]
1.
A piece of work; any thing to be done, whether of more or less importance. The carpenter or mason undertakes to build a house by the job. The erection of Westminster bridge was a heavy job; and it was a great job to erect Central wharf, in Boston. The mechanic has many small jobs on hand.
2.
A lucrative business; an undertaking with a view to profit.
No cheek is known to blush nor heart to throb,
Save when they lose a question or a job.
3.
A sudden stab with a pointed instrument. [This seems to be nearly the original sense.]
To do the job for one, to kill him.

JOB

,
Verb.
T.
To strike or stab with a sharp instrument.
1.
To drive in a sharp pointed instrument.

JOB

,
Verb.
I.
To deal in the public stocks; to buy and sell as a broker.
The judge shall job, the bishop bite the town,
and mighty dukes pack cards for half a crown.

Definition 2022


Job

Job

See also: job and Jòb

English

Proper noun

Job

Job on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
Job on Wikisource.Wikisource
Wiktionary has an Appendix listing books of the Bible

  1. (biblical) A book of the Old Testament and the Hebrew Tanakh.
  2. A male given name
  3. An Old Testament and qur'anic character.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Anagrams


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔp

Proper noun

Job ?

  1. Job (the eighteenth book of the Old Testament)

German

Etymology

From English job.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɔp/
  • Homophone: jobb

Noun

Job m (genitive Jobs, plural Jobs)

  1. a task, an assignment
    Ich hab’ ’nen Job für dich: Rasenmähen! - I have a task for you: mowing the lawn!
  2. employment

Declension

Usage notes

This word is always referencing a specified task or employment and is not normally used when talking about one's profession or work in general.

Related terms


Spanish

Proper noun

Job m

  1. (bible) Job (the book of the Bible)

Swedish

Proper noun

Job

  1. Job

Related terms

  • jobspost

job

job

See also: Job and Jòb

English

Noun

job (plural jobs)

  1. A task.
    I've got a job for you - could you wash the dishes?
    A job half done is hardly done at all.
  2. An economic role for which a person is paid.
    That surgeon has a great job.
    He's been out of a job since being made redundant in January.
    • 2013 August 10, Schumpeter, Cronies and capitols”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      Policing the relationship between government and business in a free society is difficult. Businesspeople have every right to lobby governments, and civil servants to take jobs in the private sector.
  3. (in noun compounds) Plastic surgery.
    He had had a nose job.
  4. (computing) A task, or series of tasks, carried out in batch mode (especially on a mainframe computer).
  5. A sudden thrust or stab; a jab.
  6. A public transaction done for private profit; something performed ostensibly as a part of official duty, but really for private gain; a corrupt official business.
  7. Any affair or event which affects one, whether fortunately or unfortunately.
  8. A thing (often used in a vague way to refer to something whose name one cannot recall).

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often applied to "job": easy, hard, poor, good, great, excellent, decent, low-paying, steady, stable, secure, challenging, demanding, rewarding, boring, thankless, stressful, horrible, lousy, satisfying, industrial, educational, academic.

Translations

Verb

job (third-person singular simple present jobs, present participle jobbing, simple past and past participle jobbed)

  1. (intransitive) To do odd jobs or occasional work for hire.
    • Moore
      Authors of all work, to job for the season.
  2. (intransitive) To work as a jobber.
  3. (intransitive, professional wrestling slang) To take the loss.
  4. (transitive, trading) To buy and sell for profit, as securities; to speculate in.
  5. (transitive, often with out) To subcontract a project or delivery in small portions to a number of contractors.
    We wanted to sell a turnkey plant, but they jobbed out the contract to small firms.
  6. (intransitive) To seek private gain under pretence of public service; to turn public matters to private advantage.
    • Alexander Pope
      And judges job, and bishops bite the town.
  7. To strike or stab with a pointed instrument.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L'Estrange to this entry?)
  8. To thrust in, as a pointed instrument.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Moxon to this entry?)
  9. To hire or let in periods of service.
    to job a carriage
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Thackeray to this entry?)

Translations

Derived terms

See also

Anagrams


French

Etymology

Borrowing from English job.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒɔb/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /dʒɔb/

Noun

job m, f (plural jobs)

  1. (informal) job (employment role)
  2. (Quebec, informal) work

Usage notes

  • This term is feminine in Quebec and masculine elsewhere.

Synonyms


Italian

Etymology

Borrowing from English job.

Noun

job m (invariable)

  1. job (employment role, computing task)

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowing from English job.

Noun

job m (plural jobs)

  1. (computing) job (task carried out in batch mode)