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Webster 1913 Edition


Name

Name

(nām)
,
Noun.
[AS.
nama
; akin to D.
naam
, OS. & OHG.
namo
, G.
name
, Icel.
nafn
, for
namn
, Dan.
navn
, Sw.
namn
, Goth.
namō
, L.
nomen
(perh. influenced by
noscere
,
gnoscere
, to learn to know), Gr.
ὄμονα
, Scr.
nāman
. √267. Cf.
Anonymous
,
Ignominy
,
Misnomer
,
Nominal
,
Noun
.]
1.
The title by which any person or thing is known or designated; a distinctive specific appellation, whether of an individual or a class.
Whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the
name
thereof.
Gen. ii. 19.
What’s in a
name
? That which we call a rose
By any other
name
would smell as sweet.
Shakespeare
2.
A descriptive or qualifying appellation given to a person or thing, on account of a character or acts.
His
name
shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.
Is. ix. 6.
3.
Reputed character; reputation, good or bad; estimation; fame; especially, illustrious character or fame; honorable estimation; distinction.
What men of
name
resort to him?
Shakespeare
Far above . . . every
name
that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come.
Eph. i. 21.
I will get me a
name
and honor in the kingdom.
1 Macc. iii. 14.
He hath brought up an evil
name
upon a virgin.
Deut. xxii. 19.
The king's army . . . had left no good
name
behind.
Clarendon.
4.
Those of a certain name; a race; a family.
The ministers of the republic, mortal enemies of his
name
, came every day to pay their feigned civilities.
Motley.
5.
A person, an individual.
[Poetic]
They list with women each degenerate
name
.
Dryden.
Christian name
.
(a)
The name a person receives at baptism, as distinguished from
surname
; baptismal name; in western countries, it is also called a
first name
.
(b)
A given name, whether received at baptism or not.
Given name
.
See under
Given
.
In name
,
in profession, or by title only; not in reality;
as, a friend
in name
.
In the name of
.
(a)
In behalf of; by the authority of.
“ I charge you
in the duke's name
to obey me.”
Shakespeare
(b)
In the represented or assumed character of.
“I'll to him again
in name of
Brook.”
Shakespeare
Name plate
,
a plate as of metal, glass, etc., having a name upon it, as a sign; a doorplate.
Pen name
,
a name assumed by an author; a pseudonym or
nom de plume
.
Bayard Taylor.
Proper name
(Gram.)
,
a name applied to a particular person, place, or thing.
To call names
,
to apply opprobrious epithets to; to call by reproachful appellations.
To take a name in vain
,
to use a name lightly or profanely; to use a name in making flippant or dishonest oaths.
Ex. xx. 7.
Syn. – Appellation; title; designation; cognomen; denomination; epithet.
Name
,
Appellation
,
Title
,
Denomination
. Name is generic, denoting that combination of sounds or letters by which a person or thing is known and distinguished. Appellation, although sometimes put for name simply, denotes, more properly, a descriptive term (called also
agnomen
or
cognomen
), used by way of marking some individual peculiarity or characteristic; as, Charles the Bold, Philip the Stammerer. A title is a term employed to point out one's rank, office, etc.; as, the Duke of Bedford, Paul the Apostle, etc. Denomination is to particular bodies what appellation is to individuals; thus, the church of Christ is divided into different denominations, as Congregationalists, Episcopalians, Presbyterians, etc.

Name

(nām)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Named
(nāmd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Naming
.]
[AS.
namian
. See
Name
,
Noun.
]
1.
To give a distinctive name or appellation to; to entitle; to denominate; to style; to call.
She
named
the child Ichabod.
1 Sam. iv. 21.
Thus was the building left
Ridiculous, and the work Confusion
named
.
Milton.
2.
To mention by name; to utter or publish the name of; to refer to by distinctive title; to mention.
None
named
thee but to praise.
Halleck.
Old Yew, which graspest at the stones
That
name
the underlying dead.
Tennyson.
3.
To designate by name or specifically for any purpose; to nominate; to specify; to appoint;
as, to
name
a day for the wedding; to
name
someone as ambassador
.
Whom late you have
named
for consul.
Shakespeare
4.
(House of Commons)
To designate (a member) by name, as the Speaker does by way of reprimand.
Syn. – To denominate; style; term; call; mention; specify; designate; nominate.

Webster 1828 Edition


Name

NAME

,
Noun.
1.
That by which a thing is called; the sound or combination of sounds used to express an idea, or any material substance, quality or act; an appellation attached to a thing by customary use, by which it may be vocally distinguished from other things. A name may be attached to an individual only, and is then proper or appropriate, as John, Thomas, London, Paris; or it may be attached to a species, genus, or class of things, as sheep, goat, horse, tree, animal, which are called common names, specific or generic.
2.
The letters or characters written or engraved, expressing the sounds by which a person or thing is known and distinguished.
3.
A person.
They list with women each degenerate name.
4.
Reputation; character; that which is commonly said of a person; as a good name; a bad name.
5.
Renown; fame; honor; celebrity; eminence; praise; distinction.
What men of name resort to him?
6.
Remembrance; memory.
The Lord shall blot out his name from under heaven. Deut. 29.
7.
Appearance only; sound only; not reality; as a friend in name. Rev. 3.
8.
Authority; behalf; part; as in the name of the people. When a man speaks or acts in the name of another, he does it by their authority or in their behalf, as their representative.
9.
Assumed character of another.
Had forged a treason in my patrons name.
10.
In Scripture, the name of God signifies his titles, his attributes, his will or purpose,, his honor and glory, his word, his grace, his wisdom, power and goodness, his worship or service, or God himself.
11.
Issue; posterity that preserves the name. Deut. 25.
12.
In grammar, a noun.
To call names, to apply opprobrious names; to call by reproachful appellations.
To take the name of God in vain, to swear falsely or profanely,, or to use the name of God with levity or contempt. Exodus 20.
To know by name, to honor by a particular friendship or familiarity. Exodus 33.
Christian name, the name a person receives by baptism, as distinguished from surname.

NAME

,
Verb.
T.
to call, to name, to invoke.
1.
To set or give to any person or thing a sound or combination of sounds by which it may be known and distinguished ; to call; to give an appellation to.
She named the child Ichabod. 1 Samuel 4.
Thus was the building left Ridiculous, and the work confusion named.
2.
To mention by name; to utter or pronounce the sound or sounds by which a person or thing is known and distinguished.
Neither use thyself to the naming of the Holy One.
3.
To nominate; to designate for any purpose by name.
Thou shalt anoint to me him whom I name to thee. I Samuel 16.
4.
To entitle.
To the name of Christ, to make profession of faith in him. 2 Timothy 4.

Definition 2019


Name

Name

See also: name, NAmE, namé, nàme, ñame, näme, and .name

German

Alternative forms

Noun

Name m (genitive Namens, plural Namen)

  1. name (forename, Christian name, given name)
  2. name (surname, family name)
  3. name (full name)
  4. (grammar, in compounds) noun, examples include Eigenname (proper noun), Sammelname (collective noun) and Gattungsname (appellative or common noun). Note: Compounds which aren't hyponyms of substantive are rare and obsolete, like Hauptname or Dingname (substantive noun), Beiname (adjective noun), Fürname (pronoun).

Declension

Derived terms

name

name

See also: Name, NAmE, namé, nàme, ñame, näme, and .name

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /neɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Noun

name (plural names)

  1. Any nounal word or phrase which indicates a particular person, place, class, or thing.
    • Bible, Genesis ii. 19
      Whatsoever Adam called every living creature, that was the name thereof.
    • Shakespeare
      That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet.
    • 1904, L. Frank Baum, The Marvelous Land of Oz:
      So good a man as this must surely have a name.
    • 2013 July-August, Lee S. Langston, The Adaptable Gas Turbine”, in American Scientist:
      Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo, meaning vortex, and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work.
    I've never liked the name my parents gave me so I changed it at the age of twenty.
  2. Reputation.
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Othello, III-iii:
      Good name in man and woman, dear my lord / Is the immediate jewel of their souls.
    • 1952, Old Testament, Revised Standard Version, Thomas Nelson & Sons, 2 Samuel 8:13:
      And David won a name for himself.
  3. An abusive or insulting epithet.
    Stop calling me names!
  4. A person (or legal person).
    • Dryden
      They list with women each degenerate name.
    • p. 2002, second edition of, 2002, Graham Richards, Putting Psychology in its Place, ISBN 1841692336, page 287 :
      Later British psychologists interested in this topic include such major names as Cyril Burt, William McDougall, [] .
    • 2008 edition of, 1998, S. B. Budhiraja and M. B. Athreya, Cases in Strategic Management, ISBN 0074620975 page 79 :
      Would it be able to fight the competition from ITC Agro Tech and Liptons who were ready and able to commit large resources? With such big names as competitors, would this business be viable for Marico?
    • 2009 third edition of, 1998, Martin Mowforth and Ian Munt, Tourism and Sustainability, ISBN 0203891058, page 29 :
      International non-governmental organisations (INGOs), including such household names as Amnesty International, Greenpeace and [] .
  5. Those of a certain name; a race; a family.
    • Macaulay
      The ministers of the republic, mortal enemies of his name, came every day to pay their feigned civilities.
  6. (computing) A unique identifier, generally a string of characters.
  7. An investor in Lloyds of London bearing unlimited liability.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
Descendants

References

Verb

name (third-person singular simple present names, present participle naming, simple past and past participle named)

  1. (transitive) To give a name to.
    • 1904: L. Frank Baum, The Land of Oz — I will name the fellow 'Jack Pumpkinhead!'
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      A chap named Eleazir Kendrick and I had chummed in together the summer afore and built a fish-weir and shanty at Setuckit Point, down Orham way. For a spell we done pretty well.
  2. (transitive) To mention, specify.
    He named his demands.
    You name it!
  3. (transitive) To identify as relevant or important
    naming the problem
  4. (transitive) To publicly implicate.
    The painter was named as an accomplice.
  5. (transitive) To designate for a role.
    My neighbor was named to the steering committee.
Derived terms
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Spanish ñame, substituting n for the unfamiliar Spanish letter ñ

Noun

name (plural names)

  1. Any of several types of true yam (Dioscorea) used in Caribbean Spanish cooking.
Synonyms
Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: knew · seen · better · #208: name · among · done · days

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Noun

name

  1. plural of naam

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

name

  1. (archaic) singular past subjunctive of nemen

Anagrams


Japanese

Romanization

name

  1. rōmaji reading of なめ

Kurdish

Etymology

Borrowing from Persian نامه (name)

Noun

name f

  1. letter (a document)

Lithuanian

Noun

name m

  1. locative singular of namas
  2. vocative singular of namas

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English nama.

Noun

name (plural names)

  1. name

Descendants


Volapük

Noun

name

  1. dative singular of nam

Zazaki

Etymology

Compare Middle Persian 𐭭𐭠𐭬 (nām).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɔːme/

Noun

name (nam) ?

  1. name
  2. reputation