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Webster 1913 Edition


Din

Din

(dĭn)
,
Noun.
[AS.
dyne
,
dyn
; akin to Icel.
dynr
, and to AS.
dynian
to resound, Icel.
dynja
to pour down like hail or rain; cf. Skr.
dhuni
roaring, a torrent,
dhvan
to sound. Cf.
Dun
to ask payment.]
Loud, confused, harsh noise; a loud, continuous, rattling or clanging sound; clamor; roar.
Think you a little
din
can daunt mine ears?
Shakespeare
He knew the battle’s
din
afar.
Sir W. Scott.
The dust and
din
and steam of town.
Tennyson.

Din

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Dinned
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Dinning
.]
[AS.
dynian
. See
Din
,
Noun.
]
1.
To strike with confused or clanging sound; to stun with loud and continued noise; to harass with clamor;
as, to
din
the ears with cries
.
2.
To utter with a din; to repeat noisily; to ding.
This hath been often
dinned
in my ears.
Swift.
To din into
,
to fix in the mind of another by frequent and noisy repetitions.
Sir W. Scott.

Din

,
Verb.
I.
To sound with a din; a ding.
The gay viol
dinning
in the dale.
A. Seward.

Webster 1828 Edition


Din

DIN

,
Noun.
[L. This word probably belongs to the root of tone and thunder, and denotes a rumbling or rattling noise.] Noise; a loud sound; particularly, a rattling, clattering or rumbling sound, long continued; as the din of arms; the din of war.

DIN

,
Verb.
T.
To strike with continued or confused sound; to stun with noise; to harass with clamor; as, to din the ears with cries; to din with clamor.

Definition 2022


din

din

See also: DIN, dín, dìn, -din, and dìŋ

English

Noun

din (plural dins)

  1. A loud noise; a cacophony or loud commotion.
    • 2014, Daniel Taylor, England and Wayne Rooney see off Scotland in their own back yard (in The Guardian, 18 November 2014)
      England certainly made a mockery of the claim that they might somehow be intimidated by the Glasgow din. Celtic Park was a loud, seething pit of bias.
    • So many faces Clive had not seen by daylight, and looking terrible, like cadavers jerked upright to welcome the newly dead. Invigorated by this jolt of misanthropy, he moved sleekly through the din - Amsterdam by Ian McEwen
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 7, in The Dust of Conflict:
      The patter of feet, and clatter of strap and swivel, seemed to swell into a bewildering din, but they were almost upon the fielato offices, where the carretera entered the town, before a rifle flashed.
    • Shakespeare
      Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?
    • Sir Walter Scott
      He knew the battle's din afar.
    • Tennyson
      the dust and din and steam of town
Quotations
  • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:din.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English dinnen, from Old English dynnan, from Proto-Germanic *dunjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwen-

Verb

din (third-person singular simple present dins, present participle dinning, simple past and past participle dinned)

  1. (obsolete) To be filled with sound; to resound.
  2. (transitive) To assail with loud noise.
  3. (transitive) To repeat continuously, as though to the point of deafening or exhausting somebody.
    • Jonathan Swift
      This hath been often dinned in my ears.
    2003, His mother had dinned The Whole Duty of Man into him in early childhood — Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason (Penguin 2004, page 183)
  4. (intransitive) To make a din.

Anagrams


Albanian

Alternative forms

  • dihet

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *deina 'day', from Proto-Indo-European *déi-no-, ultimately from *dyew-, *dyeu- (to shine), cognate with Proto-Slavic *dьnь, Latvian diena, Lithuanian dėina, Old Prussian dēinā[1].

Verb

din (first-person singular past tense diu, participle dinë)

  1. to break (of the day)
Related terms

References

  1. Orel, Vladimir (1998), din”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, page 66

Azeri

Other scripts
Cyrillic дин
Roman din
Perso-Arabic دین

Etymology

Borrowing from Arabic دِين (dīn).

Noun

din (definite accusative dini, plural dinlər)

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

Declension


Breton

Prepositional pronoun

din

  1. first-person singular form of da

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse þínn, from Proto-Germanic *þīnaz (your).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːn/, [d̥iːˀn]

Pronoun

din (neuter dit, plural dine)

  1. your, thy (singular; one owner)
  2. yours, thine (singular; one owner)

See also


Galician

Verb

din

  1. third-person plural present indicative of dicir

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay din, from Arabic دِين (dīn).

Noun

din

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

Kiput

Etymology

From Proto-North Sarawak *daqan, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *daqan.

Noun

din

  1. branch

Ladino

Etymology

Borrowing from Hebrew דִּין (din).

Noun

din m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling דין)

  1. religious law

Lojban

Rafsi

din

  1. rafsi of jdini.

Malay

Etymology

Borrowing from Arabic دِين (dīn).

Pronunciation

Noun

din

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

Synonyms


Maltese

Etymology

From Arabic ذِي (ḏī), plus accusative case ending اً (-an)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪn/

Determiner

din

  1. feminine singular of dan

Northern Sami

Pronoun

din

  1. accusative and genitive of dii

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse þinn.

Pronoun

din m (feminine di, neuter ditt, plural dine)

  1. your, yours

References

See also


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse þinn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /din/ (example of pronunciation)

Pronoun

din m (feminine di, neuter ditt, plural dine)

  1. your, yours

References

See also


Occitan

Preposition

din

  1. inside; alternative form of dins

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *þīnaz, whence also Old English þīn, Old Norse þínn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diːn/

Pronoun

dīn

  1. your (singular)

Romanian

Etymology

From de + în.

Preposition

din (+accusative)

  1. on, on top of
  2. from, out of

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish þīn, from Old Norse þínn, from Proto-Germanic *þīnaz, from Proto-Indo-European *téynos.

Pronunciation

Noun

din

  1. definite singular of di

Pronoun

din c (neuter ditt, plural dina)

  1. your, yours; of one thing in the common gender (speaking to one person)

Declension


Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /din/

Adverb

din

  1. too, also

Usage notes

This form is mainly used after words ending in a consonant, while rin is used following words that end in a vowel. The distinction is not always made, however.


Turkish

Etymology

Borrowing from Arabic دِين (dīn).

Noun

din (definite accusative dini, plural dinler)

  1. (religion) System of beliefs dealing with soul, deity or life after death.

Derived terms

Declension


Uzbek

Other scripts
Cyrillic дин
Roman din
Perso-Arabic ‍‍

Etymology

Borrowing from Arabic دِين (dīn).

Noun

din (plural dinlar)

  1. religion (system of beliefs dealing with soul, deity and/or life after death)

Volapük

Etymology

Borrowing from German Ding.

Noun

din (plural dins)

  1. thing

Declension

Derived terms

  • dinöf
  • dinöfik

Welsh

Noun

din

  1. Soft mutation of tin.

Mutation

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tin din nhin thin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.