Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Mine

Mine

(mēn)
,
Noun.
[F.]
See
Mien
.
[Obs.]

Mine

(mīn)
,
p
ron.
&
Adj.
[OE.
min
, fr. AS.
mīn
; akin to D.
mijn
, OS., OFries., & OHG.
mīn
, G.
mein
, Sw. & Dan.
min
, Icel.
minn
, Goth.
meins
my, mine,
meina
of me, and E.
me
. √187. See
Me
, and cf.
My
.]
Belonging to me; my. Used as a pronominal to me; my. Used as a pronominal adjective in the predicate;
as, “Vengeance is
mine
; I will repay.”
Rom. xii. 19
. Also, in the old style, used attributively, instead of my, before a noun beginning with a vowel.
I kept myself from
mine
iniquity.
Ps. xviii. 23.
Mine is often used absolutely, the thing possessed being understood; as, his son is in the army, mine in the navy.
When a man deceives me once, says the Italian proverb, it is his fault; when twice, it is
mine
.
Bp. Horne.
This title honors me and
mine
.
Shakespeare
She shall have me and
mine
.
Shakespeare

Mine

,
Verb.
I.
[F.
miner
, L.
minare
to drive animals, in LL. also, to lead, conduct, dig a mine (cf. E.
lode
, and
lead
to conduct), akin to L.
minari
to threaten; cf. Sp.
mina
mine, conduit, subterraneous canal, a spring or source of water, It.
mina
. See
Menace
, and cf.
Mien
.]
1.
To dig a mine or pit in the earth; to get ore, metals, coal, or precious stones, out of the earth; to dig in the earth for minerals; to dig a passage or cavity under anything in order to overthrow it by explosives or otherwise.
2.
To form subterraneous tunnel or hole; to form a burrow or lodge in the earth;
as, the
mining
cony
.

Mine

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Mined
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Mining
.]
1.
To dig away, or otherwise remove, the substratum or foundation of; to lay a mine under; to sap; to undermine; hence, to ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means.
They
mined
the walls.
Hayward.
Too lazy to cut down these immense trees, the spoilers . . . had
mined
them, and placed a quantity of gunpowder in the cavity.
Sir W. Scott.
2.
To dig into, for ore or metal.
Lead veins have been traced . . . but they have not been
mined
.
Ure.
3.
To get, as metals, out of the earth by digging.
The principal ore
mined
there is the bituminous cinnabar.
Ure.

Mine

,
Noun.
[F., fr. LL.
mina
. See
Mine
,
Verb.
I.
]
1.
A subterranean cavity or passage
;
especially:
(a)
A pit or excavation in the earth, from which metallic ores, precious stones, coal, or other mineral substances are taken by digging; – distinguished from the pits from which stones for architectural purposes are taken, and which are called quarries.
(b)
(Mil.)
A cavity or tunnel made under a fortification or other work, for the purpose of blowing up the superstructure with some explosive agent.
2.
Any place where ore, metals, or precious stones are got by digging or washing the soil;
as, a placer
mine
.
3.
(Fig.)
:
A rich source of wealth or other good.
Shak.
Mine dial
,
a form of magnetic compass used by miners.
Mine pig
,
pig iron made wholly from ore; in distinction from
cinder pig
, which is made from ore mixed with forge or mill cinder.
gold mine
(a)
a mine where gold is obtained.
(b)
(Fig.)
a rich source of wealth or other good; same as
Mine
3.
Raymond.

Webster 1828 Edition


Mine

MINE

,
Adj.
called sometimes a pronominal adj. [L. meus.]
My; belonging to me. It was formerly used before nouns beginning with vowels. 'I kept myself from mine iniquity.' Ps.18. But this use is no longer retained. We now use my before a vowel as well as before an articulation; as my iniquity. In present usage, my always precedes the noun, and mine follows the noun, and usually the verb; as, this is my book; this book is mine; it is called my book; the book is called mine: it is acknowledged to be mine.
Mine sometimes supplies the place of a noun. Your sword and mine are different in construction.

MINE

,
Noun.
1.
A pit or excavation in the earth, from which metallic ores, mineral substances and other fossil bodies are taken by digging. The pits from which stones only are taken, are called quarries.
2.
In the military art, a subterraneous canal or passage dug under the wall or rampart of a fortification, where a quantity of power may be lodged for blowing up the works.
3.
A rich source of wealth or other good.

MINE

,
Verb.
I.
To dig a mine or pit in the earth.
1.
To form a subterraneous canal or hole by scratching; to form a burrow or lodge in the earth, as animals; as the mining coney.
2.
To practice secret means in injury.

MINE

,
Verb.
T.
To sap; to undermine; to dig away or otherwise remove the substratum or foundation; hence, to ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means.
They mined the walls.
In a metaphorical sense, undermine is generally used.

Definition 2022


Mine

Mine

See also: mine, miné, and -mine

English

Pronoun

Mine

  1. Alternative letter-case form of mine often used when speaking as God or another important figure who is understood from context.

German

Etymology

From French mine.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmiːnə/
  • Homophone: Miene

Noun

Mine f (genitive Mine, plural Minen)

  1. (weaponry) a mine
  2. (mining) a mine

Declension

mine

mine

See also: Mine, miné, and -mine

English

Pronoun

mine

  1. My; belonging to me; that which belongs to me.
    1. Used predicatively.
      The house itself is mine, but the land is not.
    2. Used substantively, with an implied noun.
      Mine has been a long journey.
    3. Used absolutely, set off from the sentence.
      Mine for only a week so far, it already feels like an old friend.
    4. (archaic) Used attributively after the noun it modifies.
    5. (archaic) Used attributively before a vowel.
Usage notes
  • My and mine are essentially two forms of the same word, with my being used attributively before the noun, and mine being used in all other cases, as may be seen in most of the usage examples and quotations above. In this respect, this word is analogous to most of the other possessive pronouns (e.g. your vs. yours), as well as a number of other noun modifiers, such as lone/alone.
  • Historically, my came to be used only before a consonant sound, and later came to be used regardless of the following sound. Nonetheless, mine still sees archaic pre-vocalic use, as may be seen in the 1862 quotation above.
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

From Middle English, from Old French mine, from Late Latin mina, from Gaulish (compare to Welsh mwyn, Irish míanach (ore)), from Proto-Celtic *mēnis (ore, metal).

Noun

mine (plural mines)

Entrance to a gold mine in Victoria, Australia
Cutaway view of an anti-tank landmine
  1. An excavation from which ore or solid minerals are taken, especially one consisting of underground tunnels.
    This diamond comes from a mine in South Africa.
    He came out of the coal mine with a face covered in black.
    Most coal and ore comes from open-pit mines nowadays.
  2. (military) A passage dug toward or underneath enemy lines, which is then packed with explosives.
  3. (military) A device intended to explode when stepped upon or touched, or when approached by a ship, vehicle, or person.
    His left leg was blown off after he stepped on a mine.
    The warship was destroyed by floating mines.
  4. (pyrotechnics) A type of firework that explodes on the ground, shooting sparks upward.
  5. (entomology) The cavity made by a caterpillar while feeding inside a leaf.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

mine (third-person singular simple present mines, present participle mining, simple past and past participle mined)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To remove (ore) from the ground.
    Crater of Diamonds State Park is the only place in the world where visitors can mine their own diamonds.
  2. To dig into, for ore or metal.
    • Ure
      Lead veins have been traced [] but they have not been mined.
  3. (transitive) To sow mines (the explosive devices) in (an area).
    We had to slow our advance after the enemy mined the road ahead of us.
  4. (transitive) To damage (a vehicle or ship) with a mine (an explosive device).
  5. (intransitive) To dig a tunnel or hole; to burrow in the earth.
    the mining cony
  6. To dig away, or otherwise remove, the substratum or foundation of; to lay a mine under; to sap; to undermine; hence, to ruin or destroy by slow degrees or secret means.
    • Hayward
      They mined the walls.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Too lazy to cut down these immense trees, the spoilers [] had mined them, and placed a quantity of gunpowder in the cavity.
  7. (slang) To pick one's nose.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Borrowing from French mine.

Noun

mine (plural mines)

  1. Alternative form of mien

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: hair · ran · important · #566: mine · wild · front · France

Anagrams


Aromanian

Pronoun

mine

  1. Alternative form of mini

Crimean Gothic

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *mēnô.

Noun

mine

  1. moon
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Mine. Luna.

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /miːnə/, [ˈmiːnə], [ˈmiːn̩]

Noun

mine c (singular definite minen, plural indefinite miner)

  1. look, air, mien
  2. (military) mine
  3. pit

Inflection

Pronoun

mine

  1. (possessive) Plural form of min

See also


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /min/

Etymology 1

From Vulgar Latin *mina, French *meina.

Noun

mine f (plural mines)

  1. mine (excavation or explosive)
  2. pencil lead

Etymology 2

Borrowing from Breton min (beak, muzzle).

Noun

mine f (plural mines)

  1. appearance, physical aspect; expression
Derived terms
  • faire bonne mine à mauvais jeu
  • avoir bonne mine
  • avoir mauvaise mine

Etymology 3

From miner

Verb

mine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of miner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of miner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of miner
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of miner
  5. second-person singular imperative of miner

Anagrams


Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmʲɪnʲə]

Adjective

mine

  1. genitive feminine singular of mion
  2. comparative degree of mion

Noun

mine f

  1. genitive singular of min

Mutation

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mine mhine unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Italian

Noun

mine f

  1. plural of mina

Anagrams


Japanese

Romanization

mine

  1. rōmaji reading of みね

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse mínir, or from Old French mine

Noun

mine f, m (definite singular mina or minen, indefinite plural miner, definite plural minene)

  1. a mine (excavation or explosive)

Derived terms

Determiner

mine

  1. plural of min

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse mínir, or from Old French mine

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /miːnә/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

mine f (definite singular mina, indefinite plural miner, definite plural minene)

  1. a mine (excavation or explosive)

Derived terms

Determiner

mine

  1. plural of min

References


Portuguese

Verb

mine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of minar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of minar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of minar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of minar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ine

Etymology 1

From Latin , possibly through a Vulgar Latin root mēne, or through analogy with cine, from *quene, from quem. It also possibly acquired this ending through adopting the common Latin accusative inflection -inem. Compare tine, sine. Compare also Aromanian mini, Dalmatian main.

Pronoun

mine (stressed accusative form of eu)

  1. (direct object, preceded by preposition, such as "pe", "cu", "la", or "pentru") me
    iubești pe mine? - Do you love me?
Related terms
  • (unstressed form)
See also

Etymology 2

Noun

mine

  1. plural of mină

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /məin/

Pronoun

mine

  1. mine

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

mine f

  1. genitive singular of min

Spanish

Verb

mine

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of minar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of minar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of minar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of minar.