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Webster 1913 Edition


Farm

Farm

,
Noun.
[OE.
ferme
rent, lease, F.
ferme
, LL.
firma
, fr. L.
firmus
firm, fast,
firmare
to make firm or fast. See
Firm
,
Adj.
&
Noun.
]
1.
The rent of land, – originally paid by reservation of part of its products.
[Obs.]
2.
The term or tenure of a lease of land for cultivation; a leasehold.
[Obs.]
It is great willfulness in landlords to make any longer
farms
to their tenants.
Spenser.
3.
The land held under lease and by payment of rent for the purpose of cultivation.
4.
Any tract of land devoted to agricultural purposes, under the management of a tenant or the owner.
☞ In English the ideas of a lease, a term, and a rent, continue to be in a great degree inseparable, even from the popular meaning of a farm, as they are entirely so from the legal sense.
Burrill.
5.
A district of country leased (or farmed) out for the collection of the revenues of government.
The province was devided into twelve
farms
.
Burke.
6.
(O. Eng. Law)
A lease of the imposts on particular goods;
as, the sugar
farm
, the silk
farm
.
Whereas G. H. held the
farm
of sugars upon a rent of 10,000 marks per annum.
State Trials (1196).

Farm

,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Farmed
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Farming
.]
1.
To lease or let for an equivalent, as land for a rent; to yield the use of to proceeds.
We are enforced to
farm
our royal realm.
Shakespeare
2.
To give up to another, as an estate, a business, the revenue, etc., on condition of receiving in return a percentage of what it yields;
as, to
farm
the taxes
.
To
farm
their subjects and their duties toward these.
Burke.
3.
To take at a certain rent or rate.
4.
To devote (land) to agriculture; to cultivate, as land; to till, as a farm.
To farm let
,
To let to farm
,
to lease on rent.

Farm

,
Verb.
I.
To engage in the business of tilling the soil; to labor as a farmer.

Webster 1828 Edition


Farm

F'ARM

,
Noun.
1.
A tract of land leased on rent reserved; ground let to a tenant on condition of his paying a certain sum annually or otherwise for the use of it. A farm is usually such a portion of land as is cultivated by one man, and includes the buildings and fences. Rents were formerly pain in provisions, or the produce of land; but now they are generally paid in money.
This is the signification of farm in Great Britain, where most of the land is leased to cultivators.
2.
In the United States, a portion or tract of land, consisting usually of grass land, meadow, pasture, tillage and woodland, cultivated by one man and usually owned by him in fee. A like tract of land under lease is called a farm; but most cultivators are proprietors of the land, and called farmers.
A tract of new land, covered with forest, if intended to be cultivated by one man as owner, is also called a farm. A man goes into the new States, or into the unsettled country, to buy a farm, that is, land for a farm.
3.
The state of land leased on rent reserved; a lease.
It is great wilfulness in landlords to make any longer farms to their tenants.

F'ARM

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To lease, as land, on rent reserved; to let to a tenant on condition of paying rent.
We are enforced to farm our royal realm.
[In this sense, I believe, the word is not used in America.]
2.
To take at a certain rent or rate. [Not used in America.]
3.
To lease or let, as taxes, impost or other duties, at a certain sum or rate per cent. It is customary in many countries for the prince or government to farm the revenues, the taxes or rents, the imposts and excise, to individuals, who are to collect and pay them to the government at a certain percentage or rate per cent.
4.
To take or hire for a certain rate per cent.
5.
To cultivate land.
To farm let, or let to farm, is to lease on rent.

Definition 2021


Farm

Farm

See also: farm

German

Noun

Farm m (genitive Farmes, plural Farmen)

  1. a small boat; barque
Synonyms

Etymology 2

From English farm.

Noun

Farm f (genitive Farm, plural Farmen)

  1. farm (usually with reference to farms abroad)
See also

farm

farm

See also: Farm

English

Alternative forms

Photo of a farm, by Ansel Adams

Noun

farm (plural farms)

  1. (obsolete) Food; provisions; a meal.
  2. (obsolete) A banquet; feast.
  3. (obsolete) A fixed yearly amount (food, provisions, money, etc.) payable as rent or tax.
    • 1642, tr. J. Perkins, Profitable Bk. (new ed.) xi. §751. 329:
      If a man be bounden unto 1.s. in 100.l.£ to grant unto him the rent and farme of such a Mill.
    • 1700, J. Tyrrell, Gen. Hist. Eng. II. 814:
      All..Tythings shall stand at the old Farm, without any Increase.
    • 1767, W. Blackstone, Comm. Laws Eng. II. 320:
      The most usual and customary feorm or rent..must be reserved yearly on such lease.
  4. (historical) A fixed yearly sum accepted from a person as a composition for taxes or other moneys which he is empowered to collect; also, a fixed charge imposed on a town, county, etc., in respect of a tax or taxes to be collected within its limits.
    • 1876, E. A. Freeman, Hist. Norman Conquest V. xxiv. 439:
      He [the Sheriff] paid into the Exchequer the fixed yearly sum which formed the farm of the shire.
  5. (historical) The letting-out of public revenue to a ‘farmer’; the privilege of farming a tax or taxes.
    • 1885, Edwards in Encycl. Brit. XIX. 580:
      The first farm of postal income was made in 1672.
  6. The body of farmers of public revenues.
    • 1786, T. Jefferson, Writings (1859) I. 568:
      They despair of a suppression of the Farm.
  7. The condition of being let at a fixed rent; lease; a lease.
    • a1599, Spenser, View State Ireland in J. Ware Two Hist. Ireland (1633) 58:
      It is a great willfullnes in any such Land-lord to refuse to make any longer farmes unto their Tennants.
    • 1647, N. Bacon, Hist. Disc. Govt. 75:
      Thence the Leases so made were called Feormes or Farmes, which word signifieth Victuals.
    • 1818, W. Cruise, Digest Laws Eng. Real Prop. (ed. 2) IV. 68:
      The words demise, lease, and to farm let, are the proper ones to constitute a lease.
  8. A tract of land held on lease for the purpose of cultivation.
  9. A place where agricultural and similar activities take place, especially the growing of crops or the raising of livestock.
  10. (usually in combination) A location used for an industrial purpose, having many similar structures
    fuel farm; wind farm; antenna farm
  11. (computing) A group of coordinated servers.
    a render farm; a server farm

Translations

Verb

farm (third-person singular simple present farms, present participle farming, simple past and past participle farmed)

  1. (intransitive) To work on a farm, especially in the growing and harvesting of crops.
  2. (transitive) To devote (land) to farming.
  3. (transitive) To grow (a particular crop).
  4. To give up to another, as an estate, a business, the revenue, etc., on condition of receiving in return a percentage of what it yields; to farm out.
    to farm the taxes
    • Burke
      to farm their subjects and their duties toward these
  5. (obsolete) To lease or let for an equivalent, e.g. land for a rent; to yield the use of to proceeds.
    • Shakespeare
      We are enforced to farm our royal realm.
  6. (obsolete) To take at a certain rent or rate.
  7. (video games, chiefly online gaming) To engage in grinding (repetitive activity) in a particular area or against specific enemies for a particular drop or item.
    • 2004, "Doug Freyburger", Pudding Farming Requires Care (on newsgroup rec.games.roguelike.nethack)
      When you hit a black pudding with an iron weapon that does at least one point of damage there is a good chance it will divide into two black puddings of the same size (but half the hit points IIRC). [] When eaten black puddings confer several intrinsics so AC [armor class] is not the only potential benefit. [] Since black puddings are formidible[sic] monsters for an inexperienced character, farming is also a good way to die.
    • 2010, Robert Alan Brookey, Hollywood Gamers (page 130)
      The practice of gold farming is controversial within gaming communities and violates the end user licensing agreements []

Translations

Derived terms

Related terms

See also

References

  1. The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, "farm".
  2. Wedgwood, Atkinson, A dictionary of English etymology, Farm.
  3. Mantello, Rigg, Medieval Latin: an introduction and bibliographical guide, 11.3

James A. H. Murray [et al.], editor (1884–1928) A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697; and The Oxford English Dictionary; being a Corrected Re-issue with an Introduction, Supplement, and Bibliography of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (the First Supplement), Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1933, OCLC 2748467.


Dalmatian

Alternative forms

  • fiarm

Etymology

From Latin firmus. Compare Italian fermo.

Adjective

farm

  1. still, firm, steady, stationary

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

farm

  1. first-person singular present indicative of farmen
  2. imperative of farmen

Icelandic

Noun

farm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of farmur

Volapük

Noun

farm (plural farms)

  1. farm

Declension