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Webster 1913 Edition


Turn

Turn

(tûrn)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Turned
(tûrnd)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Turning
.]
[OE.
turnen
,
tournen
, OF.
tourner
,
torner
,
turner
, F.
tourner
, LL.
tornare
, fr. L.
tornare
to turn in a lathe, to round off, fr.
tornus
a lathe, Gr.
τόρνοσ
a turner’s chisel, a carpenter's tool for drawing circles; probably akin to E.
throw
. See
Throw
, and cf.
Attorney
,
Return
,
Tornado
,
Tour
,
Tournament
.]
1.
To cause to move upon a center, or as if upon a center; to give circular motion to; to cause to revolve; to cause to move round, either partially, wholly, or repeatedly; to make to change position so as to present other sides in given directions; to make to face otherwise;
as, to
turn
a wheel or a spindle; to
turn
the body or the head
.
Turn
the adamantine spindle round.
Milton.
The monarch
turns
him to his royal guest.
Pope.
2.
To cause to present a different side uppermost or outmost; to make the upper side the lower, or the inside to be the outside of; to reverse the position of;
as, to
turn
a box or a board; to
turn
a coat
.
3.
To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; – used both literally and figuratively;
as, to
turn
the eyes to the heavens; to
turn
a horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to
turn
the attention to or from something
.
“Expert when to advance, or stand, or, turn the sway of battle.”
Milton.
Thrice I deluded her, and
turned
to sport
Her importunity.
Milton.
My thoughts are
turned
on peace.
Addison.
4.
To change from a given use or office; to divert, as to another purpose or end; to transfer; to use or employ; to apply; to devote.
Therefore he slew him, and
turned
the kingdom unto David.
1 Chron. x. 14.
God will make these evils the occasion of a greater good, by
turning
them to advantage in this world.
Tillotson.
When the passage is open, land will be
turned
most to cattle; when shut, to sheep.
Sir W. Temple.
5.
To change the form, quality, aspect, or effect of; to alter; to metamorphose; to convert; to transform; – often with to or into before the word denoting the effect or product of the change;
as, to
turn
a worm into a winged insect; to
turn
green to blue; to
turn
prose into verse; to
turn
a Whig to a Tory, or a Hindu to a Christian; to
turn
good to evil, and the like
.
The Lord thy God will
turn
thy captivity, and have compassion upon thee.
Deut. xxx. 3.
And David said, O Lord, I pray thee,
turn
the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.
2 Sam. xv. 31.
Impatience
turns
an ague into a fever.
Jer. Taylor.
6.
To form in a lathe; to shape or fashion (anything) by applying a cutting tool to it while revolving;
as, to
turn
the legs of stools or tables; to
turn
ivory or metal
.
I had rather hear a brazen canstick
turned
.
Shakespeare
7.
Hence, to give form to; to shape; to mold; to put in proper condition; to adapt.
“The poet's pen turns them to shapes.”
Shak.
His limbs how
turned
, how broad his shoulders spread !
Pope.
He was perfectly well
turned
for trade.
Addison.
8.
Specifically:
(a)
To translate; to construe;
as, to
turn
the Iliad
.
Who
turns
a Persian tale for half a crown.
Pope.
(b)
To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle, etc.:
as, to
turn
cider or wine; electricity
turns
milk quickly
.
(c)
To sicken; to nauseate;
as, an emetic
turns
one's stomach
.
To be turned of
,
to be advanced beyond;
as,
to be turned of
sixty-six
.
To turn a cold shoulder to
,
to treat with neglect or indifference.
To turn a corner
,
(a)
to go round a corner.
(b)
[Fig.]
To advance beyond a difficult stage in a project, or in life.
To turn adrift
,
to cast off, to cease to care for.
To turn a flange
(Mech.)
,
to form a flange on, as around a metal sheet or boiler plate, by stretching, bending, and hammering, or rolling the metal.
To turn against
.
(a)
To direct against;
as,
to turn
one's arguments
against
himself
.
(b)
To make unfavorable or hostile to;
as,
to turn
one's friends
against
him
.
To turn a hostile army
,
To turn the enemy's flank
, or the like
(Mil.)
,
to pass round it, and take a position behind it or upon its side.
To turn a penny
, or
To turn an honest penny
,
to make a small profit by trade, or the like.
To turn around one's finger
,
to have complete control of the will and actions of; to be able to influence at pleasure.
To turn aside
,
to avert.
To turn away
.
(a)
To dismiss from service; to discard;
as,
to turn away
a servant
.
(b)
To avert;
as,
to turn away
wrath or evil
.
To turn back
.
(a)
To give back; to return.

We
turn
not
back
the silks upon the merchants,
When we have soiled them.
Shakespeare
(b)
To cause to return or retrace one's steps; hence, to drive away; to repel.
Shak.
To turn down
.
(a)
To fold or double down.
(b)
To turn over so as to conceal the face of; as, to turn down cards.
(c)
To lower, or reduce in size, by turning a valve, stopcock, or the like;
as,
turn down
the lights
.
To turn in
.
(a)
To fold or double under;
as,
to turn in
the edge of cloth
.
(b)
To direct inwards;
as,
to turn
the toes
in
when walking
.
(c)
To contribute; to deliver up; as, he turned in a large amount.
[Colloq.]
To turn in the mind
,
to revolve, ponder, or meditate upon; – with about, over, etc.
Turn these ideas about in your mind.”
I. Watts.
To turn off
.
(a)
To dismiss contemptuously; as, to turn off a sycophant or a parasite.
(b)
To give over; to reduce.
(c)
To divert; to deflect; as, to turn off the thoughts from serious subjects; to turn off a joke.
(d)
To accomplish; to perform, as work.
(e)
(Mech.)
To remove, as a surface, by the process of turning; to reduce in size by turning.
(f)
To shut off, as a fluid, by means of a valve, stopcock, or other device; to stop the passage of; as, to turn off the water or the gas.
To turn on
,
to cause to flow by turning a valve, stopcock, or the like; to give passage to;
as,
to turn on
steam
.
To turn one's coat
,
to change one's uniform or colors; to go over to the opposite party.
To turn one's goods
or
To turn one's money
, and the like
,
to exchange in the course of trade; to keep in lively exchange or circulation; to gain or increase in trade.
To turn one's hand to
,
to adapt or apply one's self to; to engage in.
To turn out
.
(a)
To drive out; to expel;
as,
to turn
a family
out
of doors;
to turn
a man
out
of office
.
I'll
turn
you
out
of my kingdom.
Shakespeare
(b)
to put to pasture, as cattle or horses.
(c)
To produce, as the result of labor, or any process of manufacture; to furnish in a completed state.
(d)
To reverse, as a pocket, bag, etc., so as to bring the inside to the outside; hence, to produce.
(e)
To cause to cease, or to put out, by turning a stopcock, valve, or the like; as, to turn out the lights.
To turn over
.
(a)
To change or reverse the position of; to overset; to overturn; to cause to roll over.
(b)
To transfer;
as,
to turn over
business to another hand
.
(c)
To read or examine, as a book, while, turning the leaves.
“We turned o'er many books together.”
Shak.
(d)
To handle in business; to do business to the amount of; as, he turns over millions a year.
[Colloq.]
To turn over a new leaf
.
See under
Leaf
.
To turn tail
,
to run away; to retreat ignominiously.
To turn the back
,
to flee; to retreat.
To turn the back on
or
To turn the back upon
,
to treat with contempt; to reject or refuse unceremoniously.
To turn the corner
,
to pass the critical stage; to get by the worst point; hence, to begin to improve, or to succeed.
To turn the die
or
To turn the dice
,
to change fortune.
To turn the edge of
or
To turn the point of
,
to bend over the edge or point of so as to make dull; to blunt.
To turn the head of
or
To turn the brain of
,
to make giddy, wild, insane, or the like; to infatuate; to overthrow the reason or judgment of;
as, a little success
turned his head
.
To turn the scale
or
To turn the balance
,
to change the preponderance; to decide or determine something doubtful; to tip the balance.
To turn the stomach of
,
to nauseate; to sicken.
To turn the tables
,
to reverse the chances or conditions of success or superiority; to give the advantage to the person or side previously at a disadvantage.
To turn tippet
,
to make a change.
[Obs.]
B. Jonson.
To turn to profit
,
To turn to advantage
, etc.
,
to make profitable or advantageous.
To turn turtle
,
to capsize bottom upward; – said of a vessel.
[Naut. slang]
To turn under
(Agric.)
,
to put, as soil, manure, etc., underneath from the surface by plowing, digging, or the like.
To turn up
.
(a)
To turn so as to bring the bottom side on top; as, to turn up the trump.
(b)
To bring from beneath to the surface, as in plowing, digging, etc.
(c)
To give an upward curve to; to tilt;
as,
to turn up
the nose
.
To turn upon
,
to retort; to throw back;
as,
to turn
the arguments of an opponent
upon
himself
.
To turn upside down
,
to confuse by putting things awry; to throw into disorder.
This house is
turned upside down
since Robin Ostler died.
Shakespeare

Turn

(tûrn)
,
Verb.
I.
1.
To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round;
as, a wheel
turns
on its axis; a spindle
turns
on a pivot; a man
turns
on his heel.
The gate . . . on golden hinges
turning
.
Milton.
2.
Hence, to revolve as if upon a point of support; to hinge; to depend;
as, the decision
turns
on a single fact
.
Conditions of peace certainly
turn
upon events of war.
Swift.
3.
To result or terminate; to come about; to eventuate; to issue.
If we repent seriously, submit contentedly, and serve him faithfully, afflictions shall
turn
to our advantage.
Wake.
4.
To be deflected; to take a different direction or tendency; to be directed otherwise; to be differently applied; to be transferred;
as, to
turn
from the road
.
Turn
from thy fierce wrath.
Ex. xxxii. 12.
Turn
ye,
turn
ye from your evil ways.
Ezek. xxxiii. 11.
The understanding
turns
inward on itself, and reflects on its own operations.
Locke.
5.
To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow;
as, wood
turns
to stone; water
turns
to ice; one color
turns
to another; to
turn
Muslim
.
I hope you have no intent to
turn
husband.
Shakespeare
Cygnets from gray
turn
white.
Bacon.
6.
To undergo the process of turning on a lathe;
as, ivory
turns
well
.
7.
Specifically: –
(a)
To become acid; to sour; – said of milk, ale, etc.
(b)
To become giddy; – said of the head or brain.
I'll look no more;
Lest my brain
turn
.
Shakespeare
(c)
To be nauseated; – said of the stomach.
(d)
To become inclined in the other direction; – said of scales.
(e)
To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; – said of the tide.
(f)
(Obstetrics)
To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery.
8.
(Print.)
To invert a type of the same thickness, as temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted.
To turn about
,
to face to another quarter; to turn around.
To turn again
,
to come back after going; to return.
Shak.
To turn against
,
to become unfriendly or hostile to.
To turn aside
or
To turn away
.
(a)
To turn from the direct course; to withdraw from a company; to deviate.
(b)
To depart; to remove.
(c)
To avert one's face.
To turn back
,
to turn so as to go in an opposite direction; to retrace one's steps.
To turn in
.
(a)
To bend inward.
(b)
To enter for lodgings or entertainment.
(c)
To go to bed.
[Colloq.]
To turn into
,
to enter by making a turn;
as,
to turn into
a side street
.
To turn off
,
to be diverted; to deviate from a course;
as, the road
turns off
to the left
.
To turn on
or
To turn upon
.
(a)
To turn against; to confront in hostility or anger.
(b)
To reply to or retort.
(c)
To depend on;
as, the result
turns on
one condition
.
To turn out
.
(a)
To move from its place, as a bone.
(b)
To bend or point outward;
as, his toes
turn out
.
(c)
To rise from bed.
[Colloq.]
(d)
To come abroad; to appear;
as, not many
turned out
to the fire
.
(e)
To prove in the result; to issue; to result;
as, the crops
turned out
poorly
.
To turn over
,
to turn from side to side; to roll; to tumble.
To turn round
.
(a)
To change position so as to face in another direction.
(b)
To change one's opinion; to change from one view or party to another.
To turn to
,
to apply one's self to; to have recourse to; to refer to.
“Helvicus's tables may be turned to on all occasions.”
Locke.
To turn to account
,
profit
,
advantage
, or the like
,
to be made profitable or advantageous; to become worth the while.
To turn under
,
to bend, or be folded, downward or under.
To turn up
.
(a)
To bend, or be doubled, upward.
(b)
To appear; to come to light; to transpire; to occur; to happen.

Turn

(tûrn)
,
Noun.
1.
The act of turning; movement or motion about, or as if about, a center or axis; revolution;
as, the
turn
of a wheel
.
2.
Change of direction, course, or tendency; different order, position, or aspect of affairs; alteration; vicissitude;
as, the
turn
of the tide
.
At length his complaint took a favorable
turn
.
Macaulay.
The
turns
and varieties of all passions.
Hooker.
Too well the
turns
of mortal chance I know.
Pope.
3.
One of the successive portions of a course, or of a series of occurrences, reckoning from change to change; hence, a winding; a bend; a meander.
And all its [the river's] thousand
turns
disclose.
Some fresher beauty varying round.
Byron.
4.
A circuitous walk, or a walk to and fro, ending where it began; a short walk; a stroll.
Come, you and I must walk a
turn
together.
Shakespeare
I will take a
turn
in your garden.
Dryden.
5.
Successive course; opportunity enjoyed by alternation with another or with others, or in due order; due chance; alternate or incidental occasion; appropriate time.
“Nobleness and bounty . . . had their turns in his [the king's] nature.”
His
turn
will come to laugh at you again.
Denham.
Every one has a fair
turn
to be as great as he pleases.
Collier.
6.
Incidental or opportune deed or office; occasional act of kindness or malice;
as, to do one an ill
turn
.
Had I not done a friendes
turn
to thee?
Chaucer.
thanks are half lost when good
turns
are delayed.
Fairfax.
7.
Convenience; occasion; purpose; exigence;
as, this will not serve his
turn
.
I have enough to serve mine own
turn
.
Shakespeare
8.
Form; cast; shape; manner; fashion; – used in a literal or figurative sense; hence, form of expression; mode of signifying;
as, the
turn
of thought; a man of a sprightly
turn
in conversation
.
The
turn
of both his expressions and thoughts is unharmonious.
Dryden.
The Roman poets, in their description of a beautiful man, often mention the
turn
of his neck and arms.
Addison.
9.
A change of condition; especially, a sudden or recurring symptom of illness, as a nervous shock, or fainting spell;
as, a bad
turn
.
[Colloq.]
10.
A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; – so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given.
[Obs.]
11.
A round of a rope or cord in order to secure it, as about a pin or a cleat.
12.
(Mining)
A pit sunk in some part of a drift.
13.
(Eng. Law)
A court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county.
Blount.
14.
pl.
(Med.)
Monthly courses; menses.
[Colloq.]
15.
(Mus.)
An embellishment or grace (marked thus, [GREEK]), commonly consisting of the principal note, or that on which the turn is made, with the note above, and the semitone below, the note above being sounded first, the principal note next, and the semitone below last, the three being performed quickly, as a triplet preceding the marked note. The turn may be inverted so as to begin with the lower note, in which case the sign is either placed on end thus [GREEK], or drawn thus [GREEK].
By turns
.
(a)
One after another; alternately; in succession.
(b)
At intervals.
“[They] feel by turns the bitter change.”
Milton.
In turn
,
in due order of succession.
To a turn
,
exactly; perfectly;
as, done
to a turn
; – a phrase alluding to the practice of cooking on a revolving spit.
To take turns
,
to alternate; to succeed one another in due order.
Turn and turn about
,
by equal alternating periods of service or duty; by turns.
Turn bench
,
a simple portable lathe, used on a bench by clock makers and watchmakers.
Turn buckle
.
See
Turnbuckle
, in Vocabulary.
Turn cap
,
a sort of chimney cap which turns round with the wind so as to present its opening to the leeward.
G. Francis.
Turn of life
(Med.)
,
change of life. See under
Change
.
Turn screw
,
a screw driver.

Webster 1828 Edition


Turn

TURN

,
Verb.
T.
[L. turnus; torniare, to turn; tornare, to return; torneare, tornire, to turn, to fence round, to tilt; torniamento, tournament.]
1.
To cause to move in a circular course; as, to turn a wheel; to turn a spindle; to turn the body.
2.
To change or shift sides; to put the upper side downwards, or one side in the place of the other. It is said a hen turns her eggs often when sitting.
3.
To alter, as a position.
Expert
When to advance, or stand, or turn the sway of battle.
4.
To cause to preponderate; to change the state of a balance; as, to turn the scale.
5.
To bring the inside out; as,to turn a coat.
6.
To alter, as the posture of the body, or direction of the look.
The monarch turns him to his royal guest.
7.
To form on a lathe; to make round.
8.
To form; to shape; used in the participle; as a body finely turned.
Him limbs how turn'd.
9.
To change; to transform; as,to turn evil to good; to turn goods into money.
Impatience turns an ague into a fever.
I pray thee, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness. 2 Sam.15.
10. To metamorphose; as, to turn a worm into a winged insect.
11. To alter or change, as color; as, to turn green to blue.
12. To change or alter in any manner; to vary.
13. To translate; as, to turn Greek into English.
--Who turns a Persian tale for half a crown.
14. To change, as the manner of writing; as,to turn prose into verse.
15. To change, as from one opinion or party to another; as, to turn one from a tory to whig; to turn Mohammedan or a pagan to a Christian.
16. To change in regard to inclination or temper.
Turn thee to me, and have mercy upon me. Ps.25.
17. To change or alter from one purpose or effect to another.
God will make these evils the occasion of greater good, by turning them to our advantage.
18. To transfer.
Therefore he slew him, and turned the kingdom to David. 1 Chron 10.
19. To cause to nauseate or lothe; as, to turn the stomach.
20. To make giddy.
Eastern priests in giddy circles run,
And turn their heads to imitate the sun.
21. To infatuate; to make mad, wild or enthusiastic; as, to turn the brain.
22. To change direction to or from any point; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn the eyes from a disgusting spectacle.
23. To direct by a change to a certain purpose or object; to direct, as the inclination, thoughts or mind. I have turned my mind to the subject.
My thoughts are turn'd on peace.
24. To revolve; to agitate in the mind.
Turn those ideas about in your mind.
25. To bend from a perpendicular direction; as, to turn the edge of an instrument.
26. To move from a direct course or strait line; to cause to deviate; as, to turn a horse from the road, or a ship from her course.
27. To apply by a change of use.
When the passage is open, land will be turned most to cattle.
28. To reverse.
The Lord thy God will turn thy captivity, and have compassion upon thee. Deut.30.
29. To keep passing and changing in the course of trade; as, to turn money or stock two or three times in the year.
30. To adapt the mind; chiefly in the participle.
He was perfectly well turned for trade.
31. To make acid; to sour; as, to turn cider or wine; to turn milk.
32. To persuade to renounce an opinion; to dissuade from a purpose, or cause to change sides. You cannot turn a firm man.
To turn aside, to avert.
To turn away, to dismiss from service; to discard; as, to turn away a servant.
1.
To avert; as, to turn away wrath or evil.
To turn back, to return; as, to turn back goods to the seller. [Little used.]
To turn down, to fold or double down.
To turn in, to fold or double; as, to turn in the edge of cloth.
To turn off, to dismiss contemptuously; as, to turn off a sycophant or parasite.
1.
To give over; to resign. We are not so wholly turned off from that reversion.
2.
To divert; to deflect; as, to turn off the thoughts from serious subjects.
To be turned of, to be advanced beyond; as, to be turned of sixty six.
To turn out, to drive out; to expel; as, to turn a family out of doors, or out of the house.
1.
To put to pasture; as cattle or horses.
To turn over, to change sides; to roll over.
1.
To transfer; as, to turn over a business to another hand.
2.
To open and examine one leaf after another; as, to turn over a concordance.
3.
To overset.
turn to, to have recourse to.
Helvetius' tables may be turned to on all occasions.
To turn upon, to retort; to throw back; as, to turn the arguments of an opponent upon himself.
To turn the back, to flee; to retreat. Ex.23.
To turn the back upon, to quit with contempt; to forsake.
To turn the die or dice, to change fortune.

TURN

,
Verb.
I.
To move round; to have a circular motion; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man turns on his heel.
1.
To be directed.
The understanding turns inwards on itself, and reflects on its own operations.
2.
To show regard by directing the look towards any thing.
Turn mighty monarch, turn this way;
Do not refuse to hear.
3.
To move the body round. He turned to me with a smile.
4.
To move; to change posture. Let your body be at rest; do not turn in the least.
5.
To deviate; as, to turn from the road or course.
6.
To alter; to be changed or transformed; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another.
7.
To become by change; as, the fur of certain animals turns in winter.
Cygnets from gray turn white.
8.
To change sides. A man in a fever turns often.
9.
To change opinions or parties; as, to turn Christian or Mohammedan.
10. To change the mind or conduct.
Turn from thy fierce wrath. Ex.32.
11. To change to acid; as,mild turns suddenly during a thunder storm.
12. To be brought eventually; to result or terminate in. This trade has not turned to much account or advantage. The application of steam turns to good account, both on land and water.
13. To depend on for decision. The question turns on a single fact or point.
14. To become giddy.
I'll look no more,
Lest my brain turn.
15. To change a course of life; to repent.
Turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways, for why will ye die? Ezek. 33.
16. To change the course or direction; as, the tide turns.
To turn about, to move the face to another quarter.
To turn away, to deviate.
1.
To depart from; to forsake.turn in, to bend inwards.
1.
To enter for lodgings or entertainment. Gen.19.
2.
To go to bed.
To turn off, to be diverted; to deviate from a course. The road turns off to the left.
To turn on or upon, to reply or retort.
1.
To depend on.
To turn out, to move from its place, as a bone.
1.
To bend outwards; to project.
2.
To rise from bed; also, to come abroad.
To turn over, to turn from side to side; to roll; to tumble.
1.
To change sides or parties.
To turn to, to be directed; as, the needle turns to the magnetic pole.
To turn under, to bend or be folded downwards.
To turn up, to bend or be doubled upwards.

TURN

,
Noun.
The act of turning; movement or motion in a circular direction, whether horizontally, vertically or otherwise; a revolution; as the turn of a wheel.
1.
A winding; a meandering course; a bend or bending; as the turn of river.
2.
A walk to and from.
I will take a turn in your garden.
3.
Change; alteration; vicissitude; as the turns and varieties of passions.
Too well the turns of mortal chance I know.
4.
Successive course.
Nobleness and bounty--which virtues had their turns in the king's nature.
5.
Manner of proceeding; change of direction. This affair may take a different turn from that which we expect.
6.
Chance; hap; opportunity.
Every one has a fair turn to be as great as he pleases.
7.
Occasion; incidental opportunity.
An old dog falling from his speed, was loaded at every turn with blows and reproaches.
8.
Time at which, by successive vicissitudes, any thing is to be had or done. They take each other's turn.
His turn will come to laugh at you again.
9.
Action of kindness or malice.
Thanks are half lost when good turns are delay'd.
Some malicious natures place their delight in doing ill turns.
10. Reigning inclination or course. Religion is not to be adapted to the turn and fashion of the age.
11. A step off the ladder at the gallows.
12. Convenience; occasion; purpose; exigence; as, this will not serve his turn.
13. Form; cast; shape; manner; in a literal or figurative sense; as the turn of thought; a man of a sprightly turn in conversation.
The turn of his thoughts and expression is unharmonious.
Female virtues are of a domestic turn.
The Roman poets, in their description of a beautiful man, often mention the turn of his neck and arms.
14. Manner of arranging words in a sentence.
15. Change; new position of things. Some evil happens at every turn of affairs.
16. Change of direction; as the turn of the tide from flood to ebb.
17. One round of a rope or cord.
18. In mining, a pit sunk in some part of a drift.
19. Turn or tourn, in law. The sheriff's turn is a court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county. [England.]
By turns, one after another; alternately.
They assist each other by turns.
1.
At intervals.
They feel by turns the bitter change.
To take turns, to take each other's places alternately.

Definition 2020


turn

turn

English

Verb

turn (third-person singular simple present turns, present participle turning, simple past and past participle turned)

  1. (heading) Non-linear physical movement.
    1. (intransitive) Of a body, person, etc, to move around an axis through itself.
      the Earth turns; turn on the spot
      • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
        "A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there. []."
    2. (transitive) To change the direction or orientation of, especially by rotation.
      Turn the knob clockwise.
      • 1879, Richard Jefferies, The Amateur Poacher, chapter1:
        It was not far from the house; but the ground sank into a depression there, and the ridge of it behind shut out everything except just the roof of the tallest hayrick. As one sat on the sward behind the elm, with the back turned on the rick and nothing in front but the tall elms and the oaks in the other hedge, it was quite easy to fancy it the verge of the prairie with the backwoods close by.
      • 2013 July-August, Lee S. Langston, The Adaptable Gas Turbine”, in American Scientist:
        Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo, meaning vortex, and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work.
    3. (intransitive) To change one's direction of travel.
      She turned right at the corner.
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
        I had occasion […] to make a somewhat long business trip to Chicago, and on my return […] I found Farrar awaiting me in the railway station. He smiled his wonted fraction by way of greeting, […], and finally leading me to his buggy, turned and drove out of town.
      • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
        I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    4. (intransitive, figuratively) To change the course of.
    5. (transitive) To shape (something) symmetrically by rotating it against a stationary cutting tool, as on a lathe.
      She turned the table legs with care and precision.
    6. (by extension) To give form to; to shape or mould; to adapt.
    7. (transitive) To position (something) by folding it, or using its folds.
      turn the bed covers; turn the pages
    8. (transitive, figuratively) To navigate through a book or other printed material.
      turn to page twenty; turn through the book
    9. (transitive, cricket) Of a bowler, to make (the ball) move sideways off the pitch when it bounces.
    10. (intransitive, cricket) Of a ball, to move sideways off the pitch when it bounces.
       
  2. (heading, intransitive) To change condition or attitude.
    1. To become (begin to be).
      The leaves turn brown in autumn.   When I asked him for the money, he turned nasty.
      • 2012 April 21, Jonathan Jurejko, Newcastle 3-0 Stoke”, in BBC Sport:
        The midfielder turned provider moments later, his exquisite reverse pass perfectly weighted for Cisse to race on to and slide past Stoke keeper Asmir Begovic.
    2. To change the color of the leaves in the autumn.
      The hillside behind our house isn't generally much to look at, but once all the trees turn it's gorgeous.
    3. To change fundamentally; to metamorphose.
      Midas made everything turn to gold. He turned into a monster every full moon.
      • 1907, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, “chapter VIII”, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: A. L. Burt Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 4241346:
        At her invitation he outlined for her the succeeding chapters with terse military accuracy; and what she liked best and best understood was avoidance of that false modesty which condescends, turning technicality into pabulum.
      • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, Geothermal Energy”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
        Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.
      1. (intransitive) To sour or spoil; to go bad.
        This milk has turned; it smells awful.
      2. (transitive) To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle.
        to turn cider or wine
    4. To reach a certain age.
      Charlie turns six on September 29.
    5. To hinge; to depend.
      The decision turns on a single fact.
      • Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)
        Conditions of peace certainly turn upon events of war.
    6. To rebel; to go against something formerly tolerated.
      The prisoners turned on the warden.
    7. To change personal condition.
      1. (professional wrestling) To change personalities, such as from being a face (good guy) to heel (bad guy) or vice versa.
      2. To become giddy; said of the head or brain.
      3. To sicken; to nauseate.
        The sight turned my stomach.
      4. To be nauseated; said of the stomach.
         
  3. (obsolete, reflexive) To change one's course of action; to take a new approach.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts VII:
      And they made a calfe in those dayes, and offered sacrifice unto the ymage, and reioysed in the workes of theyr awne hondes. Then God turned himsilfe, and gave them up []
    • Bible, Exodus xxxii. 12
      Turn from thy fierce wrath.
    • John Locke (1632-1705)
      The understanding turns inward on itself, and reflects on its own operations.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, chapter I:
      Little disappointed, then, she turned attention to "Chat of the Social World," gossip which exercised potent fascination upon the girl's intelligence.
  4. (transitive, usually with over) To complete.
    They say they can turn the parts in two days.
  5. (transitive, soccer) Of a player, to go past an opposition player with the ball in one's control.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, in BBC Sport:
      Liverpool introduced Carroll for Spearing and were rewarded after 64 minutes when he put them back in contention. Stewart Downing blocked Jose Bosingwa's attempted clearance, which fell into the path of Carroll. He turned John Terry superbly before firing high past Cech.
  6. To undergo the process of turning on a lathe.
    Ivory turns well.
  7. (obstetrics) To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery.
  8. (printing, dated) To invert a type of the same thickness, as a temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted.
  9. (archaic) To translate.
    to turn the Iliad
    • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
      who turns a Persian tale for half a crown

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

turn (plural turns)

A: Turn (14)
B: Round turn
C: Two round turns
  1. A change of direction or orientation.
    Give the handle a turn, then pull it.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      With just the turn of a shoulder she indicated the water front, where [] lay the good ship, Mount Vernon, river packet, the black smoke already pouring from her stacks. In turn he smiled and also shrugged a shoulder.
  2. A movement of an object about its own axis in one direction that continues until the object returns to its initial orientation.
  3. A single loop of a coil.
  4. A chance to use (something) shared in sequence with others.
    They took turns playing with the new toy.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      With just the turn of a shoulder she indicated the water front, where [] lay the good ship, Mount Vernon, river packet, the black smoke already pouring from her stacks. In turn he smiled and also shrugged a shoulder.
  5. The time allotted to a person in a rota or schedule.
    I cooked tonight, so it's your turn to do the dishes.
  6. One's chance to make a move in a game having two or more players.
  7. A figure in music, often denoted ~, consisting of the note above the one indicated, the note itself, the note below the one indicated, and the note itself again.
  8. (also turnaround) The time required to complete a project.
    They quote a three-day turn on parts like those.
  9. A fit or a period of giddiness.
    I've had a funny turn.
    • 1865 September 23, “Mrs. Brown and the Emperor of the French”, in Fun, London: Published (for the proprietors) by Thomas Baker, OCLC 752198897, page 17:
      I'm sure I never shall forget the turn young SIMMONS gave me when he came in with that paper as he'd been and copied out of a winder thro' being in a west-end house, []
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde:
      Then you must know as well as the rest of us that there was something queer about that gentleman—something that gave a man a turn—I don't know rightly how to say it, sir, beyond this: that you felt in your marrow kind of cold and thin.
  10. A change in temperament or circumstance.
    She took a turn for the worse.
  11. (cricket) A sideways movement of the ball when it bounces (caused by rotation in flight).
  12. (poker) The fourth communal card in Texas hold 'em.
  13. (poker, obsolete) The flop (the first three community cards) in Texas hold 'em.
  14. A deed done to another.
    One good turn deserves another.
    I felt that the man was of a vindictive nature, and would do me an evil turn if he found the opportunity [].
  15. (rope) A pass behind or through an object.
  16. Character; personality; nature.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life, Ch.VII:
      It was fortunate for his comfort, perhaps, that the man who had been chosen to accompany him was of a talkative turn, for the prisoners insisted upon hearing the story of the explosion a dozen times over, and Rufus Dawes himself had been roused to give the name of the vessel with his own lips.
  17. (soccer) An instance of going past an opposition player with the ball in one's control.
  18. (theater, chiefly clowns) A short skit or routine.

Synonyms

  • (change of direction or orientation):
  • (movement about an axis returning to the original orientation): 360° turn, complete rotation, complete turn, full rotation, full turn
  • (single loop of a coil): loop
  • (chance to use (something) shared in sequence with others): go
  • (one's chance to make a move in a game): go, move
  • (figure in music):
  • (time required to complete a project):
  • (fit or period of giddiness): dizziness, dizzy spell, giddiness
  • (change in temperament or circumstance): change, swing
  • (sideways movement of a cricket ball):

Derived terms

See also turning

Translations

Derived terms

See also

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: black · lady · truth · #415: turn · hold · cause · close

Anagrams


Icelandic

Etymology

From Latin turris (tower). Cognate with Danish tårn and German Turm. First appears in the 12th or 13th century.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʰʏrtn/
  • Rhymes: -ʏrtn

Noun

turn m

  1. tower

Declension


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From the verb turne; compare with German Turnen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʉːɳ/
  • Rhymes: -ʉːɳ

Noun

turn m (indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. gymnastics (athletic discipline)

Related terms

References


Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the verb turne

Noun

turn m (uncountable)

  1. gymnastics (athletic discipline)

Related terms

References


Romanian

Etymology

Borrowing from German Turm, from Latin turrem, accusative form of turris.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /turn/

Noun

turn n (plural turnuri)

  1. tower
  2. (chess) rook

Declension

Synonyms

See also

Chess pieces in Romanian · piese de șah (layout · text)
♚ ♛ ♜ ♝ ♞ ♟
rege regină, damă tură, turn nebun cal pion