Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


See

See

,
Noun.
[OE.
se
,
see
, OF.
se
,
sed
,
sied
, fr. L.
sedes
a seat, or the kindred
sedere
to sit. See
Sit
, and cf.
Siege
.]
1.
A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
Jove laughed on Venus from his sovereign
see
.
Spenser.
2.
Specifically:
(a)
The seat of episcopal power; a diocese; the jurisdiction of a bishop;
as, the
see
of New York
.
(b)
The seat of an archbishop; a province or jurisdiction of an archbishop;
as, an archiepiscopal
see
.
(c)
The seat, place, or office of the pope, or Roman pontiff;
as, the papal
see
.
(d)
The pope or his court at Rome;
as, to appeal to the
see
of Rome
.
Apostolic see
.
See under
Apostolic
.

See

(sē)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp.
Saw
(sa̤)
;
p. p.
Seen
(sēn)
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Seeing
.]
[OE.
seen
,
sen
,
seon
, AS.
seón
; akin to OFries.
sīa
, D.
zien
, OS. & OHG.
sehan
, G.
sehen
, Icel.
sjā
, Sw.
se
, Dan.
see
, Goth.
saíhwan
, and probably to L.
sequi
to follow (and so originally meaning, to follow with the eyes). Gr.
ἕπεσθαι
, Skr.
sac
. Cf.
Sight
,
Sue
to follow.]
1.
To perceive by the eye; to have knowledge of the existence and apparent qualities of by the organs of sight; to behold; to descry; to view.
I will now turn aside, and
see
this great sight.
Ex. iii. 3.
2.
To perceive by mental vision; to form an idea or conception of; to note with the mind; to observe; to discern; to distinguish; to understand; to comprehend; to ascertain.
Go, I pray thee,
see
whether it be well with thy brethren.
Gen. xxxvii. 14.
Jesus
saw
that he answered discreetly.
Mark xii. 34.
Who’s so gross
That
seeth
not this palpable device?
Shakespeare
3.
To follow with the eyes, or as with the eyes; to watch; to regard attentively; to look after.
Shak.
I had a mind to
see
him out, and therefore did not care for contradicting him.
Addison.
4.
To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit;
as, to go to
see
a friend
.
And Samuel came no more to
see
Saul until the day of his death.
1 Sam. xv. 35.
5.
To fall in with; to meet or associate with; to have intercourse or communication with; hence, to have knowledge or experience of;
as, to
see
military service
.
Make us glad according to the days wherein thou hast afflicted us, and the years wherein we have
seen
evil.
Ps. xc. 15.
Verily, verily, I say unto you, if a man keep my saying, he shall never
see
death.
John viii. 51.
Improvement in wisdom and prudence by
seeing
men.
Locke.
6.
To accompany in person; to escort; to wait upon;
as, to
see
one home; to
see
one aboard the cars
.
God you see
(or
God him see
or
God me see
, etc.)
,
God keep you (him, me, etc.) in his sight; God protect you.
[Obs.]
Chaucer.
To see (anything) out
,
to see (it) to the end; to be present at, work at, or attend, to the end.
To see stars
,
to see flashes of light, like stars; – sometimes the result of concussion of the head.
[Colloq.]
To see (one) through
,
to help, watch, or guard (one) to the end of a course or an undertaking.

See

,
Verb.
I.
1.
To have the power of sight, or of perceiving by the proper organs; to possess or employ the sense of vision;
as, he
sees
distinctly
.
Whereas I was blind, now I
see
.
John ix. 25.
2.
Figuratively: To have intellectual apprehension; to perceive; to know; to understand; to discern; – often followed by a preposition, as through, or into.
For judgment I am come into this world, that they which
see
not might
see
; and that they which
see
might be made blind.
John ix. 39.
Many sagacious persons will find us out, . . . and
see
through all our fine pretensions.
Tillotson.
3.
To be attentive; to take care; to give heed; – generally with to;
as, to
see
to the house
.
See
that ye fall not out by the way.
Gen. xlv. 24.
Let me see, Let us see, are used to express consideration, or to introduce the particular consideration of a subject, or some scheme or calculation.
Cassio's a proper man,
let me see
now, -
To get his place.
Shakespeare
See is sometimes used in the imperative for look, or behold. “See. see! upon the banks of Boyne he stands.”
Halifax.
To see about a thing
,
to pay attention to it; to consider it.
To see on
,
to look at.
[Obs.]
“She was full more blissful on to see.”
Chaucer.
To see to
.
(a)
To look at; to behold; to view
.
[Obs.]
“An altar by Jordan, a great altar to see to
Josh. xxii. 10.
(b)
To take care about; to look after;
as,
to see to
a fire
.

Webster 1828 Edition


See

SEE

,
Noun.
1. The seat of episcopal power; a diocese; the jurisdiction of a bishop.

Definition 2022


See

See

See also: see, se, Se, sée, seë, se'e, and

German

Noun

See m (genitive Sees, plural Seen)

  1. lake
    Dieser See ist sehr klein.
    This lake is very small.
    • "Görlitzer Park", Berliner Zeitung, November 11, 2013.
      Auf 14 Hektar gibt es unter anderem einen Kinderbauernhof, mehrere Sport-, Spiel- und Bolzplätze, zwei Aussichtsberge und einen kleinen See.
      There are, among other things, a petting zoo, multiple sporting facilities, playing grounds and soccer fields, two overlooks and a small lake on 14 hectares.

Declension

Noun

See f (genitive See, no plural)

  1. sea, ocean
    Mein Großvater ist als Fischer zur See gefahren.
    My grandfather went to sea as a fisherman.
    • Giorgos Christides, "Griechenland empört über Kritik aus Österreich: "Sollen wir die Flüchtlingsboote vielleicht versenken?"", Der Spiegel, January 26, 2016.
      Wenn man ein Boot auf See sichte, gebe es nur eine Handlungsoption.
      When one spots a boat at sea, there would only be one way to act.
  2. sea, sea condition, swell
    Die See ist heute sehr ruhig.
    The sea is very calm today.

Declension

Usage notes

  • (sea, ocean): This sense is normal in compounds and fixed expressions (as above). Otherwise, See is elevated and usually replaced by the synonym Meer.
  • (swell): This sense is very common in nautical parlance but also familiar to ordinary people.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Proper noun

See ? (genitive See)

  1. A municipality in Tyrol, Austria.

Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German , from Old Saxon sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz. Compare standard German See, Dutch zee, English sea, Swedish sjö.

Noun

See m (plural Seen)

  1. a lake

Noun

See f

  1. sea, ocean
    Mien Grootvader föhr as Fischer to de See.
    My grandfather went to sea as a fisherman.
  2. sea, sea condition, swell
    De See is vundaag bannig rohig.
    The sea is very calm today.

Usage notes

  • (sea, ocean): Contrary to its German counterpart, See in Low German is the most common word for sea and is never replaced by Meer as it is in standard German.
  • (swell): This sense is very common in nautical parlance but also familiar to ordinary people.

Synonyms

Derived terms


Luxembourgish

eng See

Etymology

From Old High German saga, from Proto-Germanic *sagō. Cognate with German Säge, English saw, Dutch zaag, Icelandic sög, Danish sav.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zeː/
    • Rhymes: -eː

Noun

See f (plural Seeën)

  1. saw

Related terms


Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /siː/

Etymology

From Hokkien (Si).

Proper noun

See

  1. A surname of Chinese origin.

see

see

See also: See, sée, seë, and se'e

English

Verb

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  1. (stative) To perceive or detect with the eyes, or as if by sight.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path. [] It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, in The Unknown Ajax:
      But Richmond [] appeared to lose himself in his own reflections. Some pickled crab, which he had not touched, had been removed with a damson pie; and his sister saw [] that he had eaten no more than a spoonful of that either.
    1. To witness or observe by personal experience.
      Now I've seen it all!
      I have been blind since birth and I love to read Braille. When the books arrive in from the library, I can’t wait to see what stories they have sent me.
      I saw military service in Vietnam.
      • Bible, John viii. 51
        Verily, verily, I say unto you, if a man keep my saying, he shall never see death.
      • Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby
        [] And remember this, 'scapegallows,' said Ralph, menacing him with his hand, 'that if we meet again, and you so much as notice me by one begging gesture, you shall see the inside of a jail once more []
  2. To form a mental picture of.
    • 2013 August 23, Mark Cocker, Wings of Desire”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 11, page 28:
      It is not just that we see birds as little versions of ourselves. It is also that, at the same time, they stand outside any moral process. They are utterly indifferent. This absolute oblivion on their part, this lack of sharing, is powerful.
    1. (figuratively) To understand.
      Do you see what I mean?
      • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, Our banks are out of control”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21:
        Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic [] . Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. [] But the scandals kept coming [] . A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul.
    2. To come to a realization of having been mistaken or misled.
      They're blind to the damage they do, but someday they'll see.
  3. (social) To meet, to visit.
    1. To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit.
      to go to see a friend
      • Bible, 1 Samuel xv. 35
        And Samuel came no more to see Saul until the day of his death.
    2. To date frequently.
      I've been seeing her for two months
  4. (by extension) To ensure that something happens, especially while witnessing it.
    I'll see you hang for this! I saw that they didn't make any more trouble.
  5. (gambling) To respond to another player's bet with a bet of equal value.
    I'll see your twenty dollars and raise you ten.
  6. (sometimes mystical) To foresee, predict, or prophesy.
    The oracle saw the destruction of the city.
  7. To determine by trial or experiment; to find out (if or whether).
    I'll come over later and see if I can fix your computer.
  8. (used in the imperative) Used to emphasise a proposition.
    You see Johnny, your Dad isn't your real dad.
  9. (used in the imperative) To reference or to study for further details.
    Step 4: In the system, check out the laptop to the student (see: "Logging Resources" in the Tutor Manual).
    This article is about the insect. For the English rock band, see The Beatles.
    For a complete proof of the Poincaré conjecture, see Appendix C.
Usage notes

Infrequently, and particularly in dialects, seen is used as the simple past tense instead of saw; in AAVE and some other dialects, it is further changed to seent. This use is nonstandard.

Inflection
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

See also

Etymology 2

From Old French sie (seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see), from Latin sedes (seat), referring to the bishop's throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (to sit).

Noun

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  1. A diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  2. The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric
  3. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
    • Spenser
      Jove laughed on Venus from his sovereign see.
Related terms
Derived terms
Translations

See also

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: two · us · before · #91: see · over · know · much

Anagrams


Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch zee.

Noun

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  1. sea

Estonian

Pronoun

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  1. this
  2. it

Declension


Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈseː/
  • Hyphenation: see

Alternative forms

Noun

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  1. cee (The name of the Latin-script letter C/c.)
    • 1990, Hämäläinen, Eila, Aletaan I: Suomen kielen oppikirja vasta-alkajille (Let's begin I: Finnish textbook for the beginners), Helsinki: Helsingin Yliopisto (University of Helsinki), ISBN 951-454-895-7, page 23:
      Luemme kirjaimet näin: aa bee see dee ee äf gee hoo ii jii koo äl äm än oo pee kuu är äs tee uu vee kaksois-vee äks yy tset ruotsalainen oo ää öö
      We read the letters as follows: aa bee see …

Declension

Inflection of see (Kotus type 18/maa, no gradation)
nominative see seet
genitive seen seiden
seitten
partitive seetä seitä
illative seehen seihin
singular plural
nominative see seet
accusative nom. see seet
gen. seen
genitive seen seiden
seitten
partitive seetä seitä
inessive seessä seissä
elative seestä seistä
illative seehen seihin
adessive seellä seillä
ablative seeltä seiltä
allative seelle seille
essive seenä seinä
translative seeksi seiksi
instructive sein
abessive seettä seittä
comitative seineen

Usage notes

  • Speakers often use the corresponding forms of c-kirjain ("letter C, letter c") instead of inflecting this word, especially in plural. The plural forms may get confused with sei (saithe).

Synonyms


Friulian

Alternative forms

  • siee

Etymology

From the verb seâ. Compare Italian sega, Venetian siega, French scie.

Noun

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  1. saw

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /zeː/

Noun

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  1. sea

Declension

Descendants


North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz. Cognates include Dutch zee.

Noun

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  1. (Föhr-Amrum) lake

Tetum

Verb

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  1. to turn, to present

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz. Compare English sea, Dutch zee, Low German and German See, Danish .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seː/

Noun

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  1. sea