Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Mind

Mind

(mīnd)
,
Noun.
[AS.
mynd
,
gemynd
; akin to OHG.
minna
memory, love, G.
minne
love, Dan.
minde
mind, memory, remembrance, consent, vote, Sw.
minne
memory, Icel.
minni
, Goth.
gamunds
, L.
mens
,
mentis
, mind, Gr.
μένος
, Skr.
manas
mind,
man
to think. √104, 278. Cf.
Comment
,
Man
,
Mean
,
Verb.
, 3d
Mental
,
Mignonette
,
Minion
,
Mnemonic
,
Money
.]
1.
The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; – often in distinction from the
body
.
By the
mind
of man we understand that in him which thinks, remembers, reasons, wills.
Reid.
What we mean by
mind
is simply that which perceives, thinks, feels, wills, and desires.
Sir W. Hamilton.
Let every man be fully persuaded in his own
mind
.
Rom. xiv. 5.
The
mind
shall banquet, though the body pine.
Shakespeare
2.
The state, at any given time, of the faculties of thinking, willing, choosing, and the like; psychical activity or state;
as:
(a)
Opinion; judgment; belief.
A fool uttereth all his
mind
.
Prov. xxix. 11.
Being so hard to me that brought your
mind
, I fear she’ll prove as hard to you in telling her
mind
.
Shakespeare
(b)
Choice; inclination; liking; intent; will.
If it be your
minds
, then let none go forth.
2 Kings ix. 15.
(c)
Courage; spirit.
Chapman.
3.
Memory; remembrance; recollection;
as, to have or keep in
mind
, to call to
mind
, to put in
mind
, etc.
To have a mind
or
To have a great mind
,
to be inclined or strongly inclined in purpose; – used with an infinitive.
“Sir Roger de Coverly . . . told me that he had a great mind to see the new tragedy with me.”
Addison.
To lose one's mind
,
to become insane, or imbecile.
To make up one's mind
,
to come to an opinion or decision; to determine.
To put in mind
,
to remind.
“Regard us simply as putting you in mind of what you already know to be good policy.”
Jowett (Thucyd. ).

Mind

(mīnd)
,
Verb.
T.
[
imp. & p. p.
Minded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Minding
.]
[AS.
myndian
,
gemyndīan
to remember. See
Mind
,
Noun.
]
1.
To fix the mind or thoughts on; to regard with attention; to treat as of consequence; to consider; to heed; to mark; to note.
Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate.”
Rom. xii. 16.
My lord, you nod: you do not
mind
the play.
Shakespeare
2.
To occupy one's self with; to employ one's self about; to attend to;
as, to
mind
one's business
.
Bidding him be a good child, and
mind
his book.
Addison.
3.
To obey;
as, to
mind
parents; the dog
minds
his master.
4.
To have in mind; to purpose.
Beaconsfield.
I
mind
to tell him plainly what I think.
Shakespeare
5.
To put in mind; to remind.
[Archaic]
M. Arnold.
He
minded
them of the mutability of all earthly things.
Fuller.
I do thee wrong to
mind
thee of it.
Shakespeare
Never mind
,
do not regard it; it is of no consequence; no matter.
Syn. – To notice; mark; regard; obey. See
Attend
.

Mind

,
Verb.
I.
To give attention or heed; to obey;
as, the dog
minds
well
.

Webster 1828 Edition


Mind

MIND

,
Noun.
[L. reminiscor; L. mens; Gr. memory, mention, to remember, mind, ardor of mind, vehemence; anger. Mind signifies properly intention, a reaching or inclining forward to an object, from the primary sense of extending, stretching or inclining, or advancing eagerly, pushing or setting forward, whence the Greek sense of the word, in analogy with the Teutonic mod, moed, muth, mind, courage, spirit, mettle. So L. animus, animosus.]
1.
Intention; purpose; design.
The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination; how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind. Prov.21.
2.
Inclination; will; desire; a sense much used, but expressing less than settled purpose; as in the common phrases, 'I wish to know your mind;' 'let me know your mind;' 'he had a mind to go;' 'he has a partner to his mind.'
3.
Opinion; as, to express one's mind. We are of one mind.
4.
Memory; remembrance; as, to put one in mind; to call to mind; the fact is out of my mind; time out of mind. From the operations of the intellect in man,this word came to signify.
5.
The intellectual or intelligent power in man; the understanding; the power that conceives, judges or reasons.
I fear I am not in my perfect mind.
So we speak of a sound mind, a disordered mind, a weak mind, a strong mind, with reference to the active powers of the understanding; and in a passive sense, it denotes capacity, as when we say, the mind cannot comprehend a subject.
6.
The heart or seat of affection.
Which were a grief of mind to Isaac and Rebekah. Gen.26.
7.
The will and affection; as readiness of mind. Acts.17.
8.
The implanted principle of grace. Rom.7.

MIND

,
Verb.
T.
To attend to; to fix the thoughts on; to regard with attention.
Cease to request me; let us mind our way.
Mind not high things. Rom.12.
1.
To attend to or regard with submission; to obey. His father told him to desist, but he would not mind him.
2.
To put in mind; to remind.
3.
To intend; to mean.

MIND

,
Verb.
I.
To be inclined or disposed to incline.
When one of them mindeth to go into rebellion.

Definition 2022


mind

mind

English

Noun

mind (plural minds)

  1. The ability for rational thought.
    Despite advancing age, his mind was still as sharp as ever.
  2. The ability to be aware of things.
    There was no doubt in his mind that they would win.
  3. The ability to remember things.
    My mind just went blank.
  4. The ability to focus the thoughts.
    I can’t keep my mind on what I’m doing.
  5. Somebody that embodies certain mental qualities.
    He was one of history’s greatest minds.
  6. Judgment, opinion, or view.
    He changed his mind after hearing the speech.
  7. Desire, inclination, or intention.
    She had a mind to go to Paris.; a mind to the madness
  8. A healthy mental state.
    I, ______ being of sound mind and body, do hereby []
    You are losing your mind.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      “[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  9. (philosophy) The non-material substance or set of processes in which consciousness, perception, affectivity, judgement, thinking, and will are based.
    The mind is a process of the brain.
    • 1699, William Temple, Heads designed for an essay on conversations
      Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
    • 1854, Samuel Knaggs, Unsoundness of Mind Considered in Relation to the Question of Responsibility for Criminal Acts, p.19:
      The mind is that part of our being which thinks and wills, remembers and reasons; we know nothing of it except from these functions.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      Thus they dwelled for nearly a year, and in that time Robin Hood often turned over in his mind many means of making an even score with the Sheriff.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 7, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      [] St. Bede's at this period of its history was perhaps the poorest and most miserable parish in the East End of London. Close-packed, crushed by the buttressed height of the railway viaduct, rendered airless by huge walls of factories, it at once banished lively interest from a stranger's mind and left only a dull oppression of the spirit.

Synonyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

Verb

mind (third-person singular simple present minds, present participle minding, simple past and past participle minded)

  1. (now regional) To remember. [from 14th c.]
  2. (now rare except in phrases) To concern oneself with, to pay attention to. [from 15th c.]
    You should mind your own business.
    • Addison
      bidding him be a good child, and mind his book
  3. (originally and chiefly in negative or interrogative constructions) To dislike, to object to; to be bothered by. [from 16th c.]
    I wouldn't mind an ice cream right now.
  4. (now chiefly Canada, US, Ireland) To pay attention to; to listen attentively to, to obey. [from 16th c.]
    • 2000, George RR Martin, A Storm of Swords, Bantam 2011, page 84:
      ‘Should you ever have a son, Sansa, beat him frequently so he learns to mind you.’
  5. To pay attention to (something); to keep one's mind on.
    • Shakespeare
      My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play.
  6. To look after, to take care of, especially for a short period of time. [from 17th c.]
    Would you mind my bag for me?
  7. (chiefly in the imperative) To make sure, to take care (that). [from 17th c.]
    Mind you don't knock that glass over.
  8. To be careful about. [from 18th c.]
    • 2005, Gillie Bolton, Reflective Practice: Writing And Professional Development, ISBN 9781848602120, page xv:
      Bank Underground Station, London, is built on a curve, leaving a potentially dangerous gap between platform and carriage to trap the unwary. The loudspeaker voice instructs passengers to "Mind the gap": the boundary between train and platform.
  9. (obsolete) To have in mind; to intend.
    • Shakespeare
      I mind to tell him plainly what I think.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Beaconsfield to this entry?)
  10. (obsolete) To put in mind; to remind.
    • Fuller
      He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of M. Arnold to this entry?)
    • Shakespeare
      I do thee wrong to mind thee of it.

Derived terms

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: look · heard · night · #202: mind · heart · going · knew

Danish

Verb

mind

  1. imperative of minde

Estonian

Pronoun

mind

  1. Partitive singular form of mina: "me"

Hungarian

Etymology

Presumably from mi? (what?).[1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmind]

Pronoun

mind

  1. all of it
    Mind megettem.- I ate all of it.

Declension

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative mind
accusative mindet
dative mindnek
instrumental minddel
causal-final mindért
translative minddé
terminative mindig
essive-formal mindként
essive-modal
inessive mindben
superessive minden
adessive mindnél
illative mindbe
sublative mindre
allative mindhez
elative mindből
delative mindről
ablative mindtől

Adverb

mind (not comparable)

  1. with everyone, all, together (usually of persons)
    Mind összegyűltek a ház előtt. - They all (together) gathered in front of the house.
  2. all of them, everyone, each of them (grammatically singular)
    Milyenek a fogaid? - Nem jók, de még mind megvan. - How are your teeth? - They are not perfect, but I still have all of them.
  3. continually, continuously (used with comparative form)
    Mind nagyobb igény van erre a szolgáltatásra. - There is more and more demand for this service.

Synonyms

Derived terms

(Compound words):

(Expressions):

Conjunction

mind

  1. (formal) both... and..., as well as
    mind a magánéletben, mind a munkában - both in private life and in work

References

  1. Gábor Zaicz, Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete, Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ISBN 963 7094 01 6

Scots

Etymology

From Old English ġemynd, from Proto-Germanic *gamundiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑend/

Noun

mind (plural minds)

  1. memory, recollection.
  2. mind.

Verb

mind (third-person singular present minds, present participle mindin, past mindit, past participle mindit)

  1. To remember.
  2. To remind.
  3. To mind, care.