Definify.com

Webster 1913 Edition


Lord

Lord

(lôrd)
,
Noun.
[Cf. Gr. [GREEK] bent so as to be convex in front.]
A hump-backed person; – so called sportively.
[Eng.]
Richardson (Dict.).

Lord

,
Noun.
[OE.
lord
,
laverd
,
loverd
, AS.
hlāford
, for
hlāfweard
, i. e., bread keeper;
hlāf
bread, loaf +
weardian
to look after, to take care of, to ward. See
Loaf
, and
Ward
to guard, and cf.
Laird
,
Lady
.]
1.
One who has power and authority; a master; a ruler; a governor; a prince; a proprietor, as of a manor.
But now I was the
lord

Of this fair mansion.
Shakespeare
Man over men
He made not
lord
.
Milton.
2.
A titled nobleman., whether a peer of the realm or not; a bishop, as a member of the House of Lords; by courtesy; the son of a duke or marquis, or the eldest son of an earl; in a restricted sense, a baron, as opposed to noblemen of higher rank.
[Eng.]
3.
A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons;
as,
lord
advocate,
lord
chamberlain,
lord
chancellor,
lord
chief justice, etc.
[Eng.]
4.
A husband.
“My lord being old also.”
Gen. xviii. 12.
Thou worthy
lord

Of that unworthy wife that greeteth thee.
Shakespeare
5.
(Feudal Law)
One of whom a fee or estate is held; the male owner of feudal land;
as, the
lord
of the soil; the
lord
of the manor.
6.
The Supreme Being; Jehovah.
☞ When Lord, in the Old Testament, is printed in small capitals, it is usually equivalent to Jehovah, and might, with more propriety, be so rendered.
7.
(Christianity)
The Savior; Jesus Christ.
House of Lords
,
one of the constituent parts of the British Parliament, consisting of the lords spiritual and temporal.
Lord high chancellor
,
Lord high constable
,
etc. See
Chancellor
,
Constable
, etc.
Lord justice clerk
,
the second in rank of the two highest judges of the Supreme Court of Scotland.
Lord justice general
, or
Lord president
,
the highest in rank of the judges of the Supreme Court of Scotland.
Lord keeper
,
an ancient officer of the English crown, who had the custody of the king’s great seal, with authority to affix it to public documents. The office is now merged in that of the chancellor.
Lord lieutenant
,
a representative of British royalty: the
lord lieutenant of Ireland
being the representative of royalty there, and exercising supreme administrative authority; the
lord lieutenant of a county
being a deputy to manage its military concerns, and also to nominate to the chancellor the justices of the peace for that county.
Lord of misrule
,
the master of the revels at Christmas in a nobleman's or other great house.
Eng. Cyc.
Lords spiritual
,
the archbishops and bishops who have seats in the House of Lords.
Lords temporal
,
the peers of England; also, sixteen representative peers of Scotland, and twenty-eight representatives of the Irish peerage.
Our lord
,
Jesus Christ; the Savior.
The Lord's Day
,
Sunday; the Christian Sabbath, on which the Lord Jesus rose from the dead.
The Lord's Prayer
,
(Christianity)
the prayer which Jesus taught his disciples, also called the
Our Father
.
Matt. vi. 9-13.
The Lord's Supper
.
(a)
The paschal supper partaken of by Jesus the night before his crucifixion.
(b)
The sacrament of the eucharist; the holy communion.
The Lord's Table
.
(a)
The altar or table from which the sacrament is dispensed.
(b)
The sacrament itself.

Lord

,
Verb.
T.
1.
To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord.
[R.]
Shak.
2.
To rule or preside over as a lord.
[R.]

Lord

,
Verb.
I.
[
imp. & p. p.
Lorded
;
p. pr. & vb. n.
Lording
.]
To play the lord; to domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; – sometimes with
over
; and sometimes with
it
in the manner of a transitive verb;
as, rich students
lording
it over their classmates
.
The whiles she
lordeth
in licentious bliss.
Spenser.
I see them
lording
it in London streets.
Shakespeare
And
lorded
over them whom now they serve.
Milton.

Webster 1828 Edition


Lord

LORD

,
Noun.
1.
A master; a person possessing supreme power and authority; a ruler; a governor.
Man over man he made not lord.
But now I was the lord of this fair mansion.
2.
A tyrant; an oppressive ruler.
3.
A husband.
I oft in bitterness of soul deplores my absent daughter, and my dearer lord.
My lord also being old. Gen. 18.
4.
A baron; the proprietor of a manor; as the lord of the manor.
5.
A nobleman; a title of honor in Great Britain given to those who are noble by birth or creation; a peer of the realm, including dukes, marquises, earls, viscounts and barons. Archbishops and bishops also, as members of the house of lords, are lords of parliament. Thus we say, lords temporal and spiritual. By courtesy also the title is given to the sons of dukes and marquises, and to the eldest sons of earls.
6.
An honorary title bestowed on certain official characters; as lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, &c.
7.
In scripture, the Supreme Being; Jehovah. When Lord, in the Old Testament, is prints in capitals, it is the translation of JEHOVAH, and so might, with more propriety, be rendered. The word is applied to Christ, Ps. 110. Col. 3. and to the Holy Spirit, 2Thess. 3. As a title of respect, it is applied to kings, Gen. 40. 2Sam. 19. to princes and nobles, Gen 42. Dan. 4. to a husband, Gen. 18. to a prophet, 1Kings 18. 2Kings 2. and to a respectable person, Gen. 24. Christ is called the Lord of glory, 1Cor. 2. and Lord of lords, Rev. 19.

LORD

,
Verb.
T.
To invest with the dignity and privileges of a lord.

LORD

,
Verb.
I.
To domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; sometimes followed by over, and sometimes by it, in the manner of a transitive verb.
The whiles she lordeth in licentious bliss.
I see them lording it in London streets.
They lorded over them whom now they serve.

Definition 2022


Lord

Lord

See also: lord, LORD, Lords, and Lord's

English

Proper noun

Lord (plural Lords)

  1. (Judaism, Islam) The God of Abraham and the Jewish scriptures, (Christianity) God the Father; the Godhead.
  2. (Christianity) Jesus Christ, God the Son.
  3. (religion) Any other deity particularly important to a religion or a worshipper.

Usage notes

In monotheistic contexts (including Trinitarian Christianity), the term is used absolutely: "the Lord". In reference to Jesus, it is often expressed as "Our Lord" or "Our Lord and Savior". (Note, however, that Mormonism typically distinguishes "the Lord" as describing Jesus and "God" as describing Elohim, the God of Abraham.)

In many English Bibles, references in the Hebrew Tanakh to the names of God, Adonai and YHWH, are distinguished by capitalizing the former as "Lord" and the latter as "LORD", "LORD", "LORD", etc. Similarly, "Lord God", "Lord GOD", etc. translate the dual form "Adonai YHWH". "Lord of Hosts" (etc.) translates the Hebrew name YHWH Sabaoth.

Derived terms

Translations

Interjection

Lord

  1. (originally an invocation) An interjection variously expressing astonishment, surprise, resignation.

Usage notes

Originally solemn, now typically invoked in trivial and profane use.

Derived terms

Noun

Lord (plural Lords)

  1. A formal title of the lesser British nobility, used as a shortened form for a Lord of the Manor and Lord Proprietor.
  2. A generic title used in reference to any peer of the British nobility or any peer below the dignity of duke and (as a courtesy title) for the younger sons of dukes and marquesses (see usage note).
  3. Similar formal and generic titles in other countries.
  4. An additional title added to denote the dignity of certain high officials, such as the "Lord Mayors" of major cities in the British Commonwealth
  5. The elected president of a festival.
  6. (Wicca) A high priest.

Usage notes

The title lord is usually understood as one borne by men and lady is its usual female equivalent. For example, King William IV of the United Kingdom was styled Lord of Mann and, upon his death, his niece Victoria was styled Lady of Mann. Modern usage is not always so clear, however, and "lord" may now refer to either male or female bearers of a title. For example, Queen Elizabeth II is presently styled "the Queen, Lord of Mann".

Lord is the formal title of only a few British nobles. It is, however, traditionally used as a title and form of address for all members of the British peerage, including the Lords Spiritual (the 26 bishops of the established Church of England). In present practice, dukes are instead styled "Your" or "His Grace" and the Lords Spiritual are usually styled "Lord Bishop". The younger sons of dukes and marquesses also bear the courtesy title of lord.

Derived terms

See also derived terms at lord.
  • (festival titles): Harvest Lord, Lord of Christmas, Lord of Misrule, Lord Muck, Summer Lord
  • (British titles): Civil Lord, Lords' Act, Lord Admiral, Lords of the Admiralty, Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, Lord High Admiral, Lord Advocate, Lords of the Articles, Lord Bishop, Lord Chamberlain, Lord Great Chamberlain of England, Lord Chancellor, Lord Clerk Register, Lords of the Congregation, Lords of the Daily Council, Lord Derby, Lord General, Lords Commissioners of the Great Seal, Lord High Constable, Lord of Ireland, Lords of the Judiciary, Lord Marcher, Lord Mayor, Lord of the Manor, Lords, Lords of Parliament, Lords of Police, Lord Probationer, Lord Proprietor, Lord-rector, Lord-rectorship, Lords of Regality, Lord Register, Lords of Session, Lords Spiritual, Lords Temporal, Lords of the Treasury, Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, Naval Lords
  • (direct address): his Lord, my Lord, my Lord of (London, Canterbury, etc.), my Lord Duke, my Lord Marquis, my Lord Mayor

Related terms

Coordinate terms

  • (female, spouses) Lady
  • (dukes) Grace
  • (bishops) Lord Bishop

Translations

Statistics

Most common English words before 1923: head · called · p · #187: Lord · de · whole · find

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "lord, n." Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1903.

lord

lord

See also: LORD, Lord, Lords, and Lord's

English

Noun

lord (plural lords)

  1. (obsolete) The master of the servants of a household; (historical) the master of a feudal manor
    1. (archaic) The male head of a household, a father or husband.
    2. (archaic) The owner of a house, piece of land, or other possession
      • ante 1300, Cursor Mundi, 601 f.
        Als oure lauerd has heuen in hand
        Sua suld man be lauerd of land.
      • 1480, Waterford Archives in the 10th Report of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts (1885), App. v. 316
        All suche lordes as have gutters betuxte thar houses.
      • ante 1637, Ben Jonson, Sad Shepherd, ii. i. 36
        A mightie Lord of Swine!
      • 1697, John Dryden translating Publius Virgilius Maro's Æneis, xii
        Turnus...
        Wrench'd from his feeble hold the shining Sword;
        And plung'd it in the Bosom of its Lord.
      • 1874, J. H. Collins, Principles of Metal Mining (1875), Gloss. 139/2
        Lord, the owner of the land in which a mine is situated is called the ‘lord’.
  2. One possessing similar mastery over others; (historical) any feudal superior generally; any nobleman or aristocrat; any chief, prince, or sovereign ruler; in Scotland, a male member of the lowest rank of nobility (the equivalent rank in England is baron)
    1. (historical) A feudal tenant holding his manor directly of the king
    2. A peer of the realm, particularly a temporal one
    3. (obsolete, uncommon) A baron or lesser nobleman, as opposed to greater ones
      • 1526, W. Bonde, Pylgrimage of Perfection, i. sig. Bviiiv
        Farre excellyng the state of lordes, erles, dukes or kynges.
      • 1826, Benjamin Disraeli, Vivian Grey, II. iii. iii. 26
        The Marquess played off the two Lords and the Baronet against his former friend.
  3. One possessing similar mastery in figurative senses (esp. as lord of ~)
    • ante 1300, Cursor Mundi, 782
      O wityng bath god and ill Ȝee suld be lauerds at ȝour will.
    • 1398, John Trevisa translating Bartholomew de Glanville's De Proprietatibus Rerum (1495), viii. xvi. 322
      The sonne is the lorde of planetes.
      1697, John Dryden translating Publius Virgilius Maro as Georgics, iii
      Love is Lord of all.
    • 1992 November 18, Larry David, Seinfeld, 4.11: "The Contest":
      But are you still master of your domain?
      I am king of the county. You?
      Lord of the manor.
    1. The magnates of a trade or profession
      • 1823, W. Cobbett, Rural Rides (1885), I. 399
        Oh, Oh! The cotton Lords are tearing!
  4. (astrology) The heavenly body considered to possess a dominant influence over an event, time, etc.
  5. (Britain, slang, obsolete) A hunchback.
    • 1699, B.E., A new dictionary of the terms ancient and modern of the canting crew:
      Lord, a very crooked, deformed... Person.
  6. (Britain, Australia, via Cockney rhyming slang, obsolete) Sixpence.
    • 1933 November 16, Times Literary Supplement, 782/1:
      Twenty years ago you might hear a sixpence described as a ‘Lord’ meaning ‘Lord of the Manor’; that is, a tanner.

Derived terms

Synonyms

Descendants

See also

Translations

Verb

lord (third-person singular simple present lords, present participle lording, simple past and past participle lorded)

  1. (intransitive and transitive) Domineer or act like a lord.
  2. (transitive) To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

Derived terms

Translations

References

  1. Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. "lord, n.". Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1903.

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɔɻʈ/

Noun

lord

  1. indefinite accusative singular of lordur

Hungarian

Etymology

From English lord. [1]

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlord]
  • Hyphenation: lord

Noun

lord (plural lordok)

  1. lord (English nobleman or aristocrat)

Declension

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative lord lordok
accusative lordot lordokat
dative lordnak lordoknak
instrumental lorddal lordokkal
causal-final lordért lordokért
translative lorddá lordokká
terminative lordig lordokig
essive-formal lordként lordokként
essive-modal
inessive lordban lordokban
superessive lordon lordokon
adessive lordnál lordoknál
illative lordba lordokba
sublative lordra lordokra
allative lordhoz lordokhoz
elative lordból lordokból
delative lordról lordokról
ablative lordtól lordoktól
Possessive forms of lord
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. lordom lordjaim
2nd person sing. lordod lordjaid
3rd person sing. lordja lordjai
1st person plural lordunk lordjaink
2nd person plural lordotok lordjaitok
3rd person plural lordjuk lordjaik

References

  1. Tótfalusi István, Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára. Tinta Könyvkiadó, Budapest, 2005, ISBN 963 7094 20 2

Italian

Etymology

Borrowing from English lord.

Noun

lord m (invariable)

  1. lord (British aristocrat)
  2. gentleman

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

Borrowing from English lord.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lôrd/

Noun

lȍrd m (Cyrillic spelling ло̏рд)

  1. lord (British title)

Declension

References

  • lord” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowing from English lord.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loɾð/, /loɾ/

Noun

lord m (plural lores)

  1. lord (British title)

Related terms


Turkish

Etymology

Borrowing from English lord.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɫoɾd]
  • Hyphenation: lord

Noun

lord (definite accusative lordu, plural lordlar)

  1. lord

Declension

Hypernyms

  • asilzade